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PERSUASION AND THE SOCIAL VISION IN ROBESPIERRE AND SAINT-JUST Will Slater Alex Holden PowerPoint Presentation
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PERSUASION AND THE SOCIAL VISION IN ROBESPIERRE AND SAINT-JUST Will Slater Alex Holden. SOCIAL AND POLITICAL CONTEXT. Fear that the Revolution’s momentum had started to stall Royalist and counter-revolutionary armies further South Number of moderates beginning to sway

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Presentation Transcript
slide1

PERSUASION

AND THE

SOCIAL VISION

IN ROBESPIERRE AND SAINT-JUST

Will Slater

Alex Holden

slide2

SOCIAL AND POLITICAL CONTEXT

  • Fear that the Revolution’s momentum had started to stall
  • Royalist and counter-revolutionary armies further South
  • Number of moderates beginning to sway
  • Concern from la Montaigne and the Jacobins about a shift in power
slide3

ROUSSEAU’S INFLUENCE

  • Jean-Jacques Rousseau as established influence on both men
  • Key idea of submitting to the authority of the general will
  • Principles of democracy, virtue and natural goodness of man
  • Robespierre adopted his theory of revolution as an issue of morality
slide4

SAINT-JUSTBACKGROUND

  • Notoriously disciplined, zealous and ruthless
  • Began more moderately, praising the democracy of the Assembly
  • Became influential among the Jacobins.
  • Committee of Public Safety, 1793
slide5

ROBESPIERRE BACKGROUND

  • Prolific writer and eloquent orator during the Revolution
  • Initial unpopularity in Constituent Assembly for radical egalitarian ideals
  • Influential member of Jacobins
  • Member of Committee of Public Safety
slide6

REVOLUTIONARYVOCABULARY ANDCUSTOMS

  • The use of citoyen and tutoiement
  • Change of official calendar
  • The Dechristianisation of the country
  • Collective vocabulary.
slide7

THE NEED FOR A STRONG LEADERSHIP

  • Risk of fragmentation from revolutionaries
  • Non-forceful action is futile
  • Criticism of weak, bloated government’s lack of direction
  • The ‘sword of the people’
  • Classical references: Powerful leaders of Hannibal Barcaand Mithrindates
slide8

APPEALING TO FEAR

  • Appealed to fears of disorder, vigilante justice, crime
  • Old suspicions and mistrust brought back: merchant classes, foreigners
  • Dispelling of the idea that the economy was in the process of stabilising
slide9

VISION OF FOR A REPUBLICAN UTOPIA

  • Virtue and morality in government
  • Sovereignty through direct participatory democracy and suitable representation
  • The people are inherently good with inalienable fundamental rights
  • Revolutionary change as a moral matter
  • Fight to end of Revolution
slide10

IMPORTANCE OF THE LAW

  • Lawyer by profession
  • Believed the regeneration of France lay in strong laws
  • Legal authority to achieve equality
  • Proposed amendments to judicial system, laws on freedoms and Déclaration
slide11

ONE WITH THE PEOPLE

  • Representative of the people
  • Revolutionary camaraderie in language
  • In keeping with principle of inherent goodness of people