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Lecture 18 – November 14, 2012 – Republicans (Radicals?) In Charge PowerPoint Presentation
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Lecture 18 – November 14, 2012 – Republicans (Radicals?) In Charge

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Lecture 18 – November 14, 2012 – Republicans (Radicals?) In Charge

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  1. Lecture 18 – November 14, 2012 – Republicans (Radicals?) In Charge Who’s in Charge of Congress during Reconstruction? Radicals – Who were they? Congress’s Turn: 1866 – Republican-crafted Legislation. to improve the terms of Reconstruction Renewed Freedmen’s Bureau – Johnson veto – overrode the veto Passed Civil Rights Bill – Johnson veto – overrode the veto Passed 14th Amend. –battle with President over state ratificationWhat does this Amendment do? 11/66 elections – Republicans win; emboldened by big electoral gains --sets the stage for Military Reconstruction Acts of 1867 First Reconstruction Act – Turns southern states into 5 military districts Army Appropriations Act – Subordinating Johnson to Grant in milit. decisions Tenure of Office Act – Limiting changes in civilian personnel [Senate-confm] Second Reconstruction Act – Establishing procedures for registering voters Third Reconstruction Act – Military Personnel Decisions fall to Grant Getting Rid of Johnson Evaluating Various Reconstruction Plans? Was Johnson Incompetent? Were the Radicals Overreaching? Irrational?

  2. Radicals Respond in December ‘65 and beyond Charles Sumner - MA Thaddeus Stevens - PA Congress’s Radical Republican Leaders – Larger than life? Powerful and vocal men, but their’s was a minority view.

  3. The Freedman’s Bureau….in peril. February 1866

  4. 1867 Military Reconstruction Acts – reoccupy the South

  5. Fourteenth Amendment – June 1866  ratified 1868 • Section. 1. All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws. • Section. 2. Representatives shall be apportioned among the several States according to their respective numbers, counting the whole number of persons in each State, excluding Indians not taxed. But when the right to vote at any election for the choice of electors for President and Vice President of the United States, Representatives in Congress, the Executive and Judicial officers of a State, or the members of the Legislature thereof, is denied to any of the male inhabitants of such State, being twenty-one years of age, and citizens of the United States, or in any way abridged, except for participation in rebellion, or other crime, the basis of representation therein shall be reduced in the proportion which the number of such male citizens shall bear to the whole number of male citizens twenty-one years of age in such State.

  6. Section 3. No person shall be a Senator or Representative in Congress, or elector of President and Vice President, or hold any office, civil or military, under the United States, or under any state, who, having previously taken an oath, as a member of Congress, or as an officer of the United States, or as a member of any state legislature, or as an executive or judicial officer of any state, to support the Constitution of the United States, shall have engaged in insurrection or rebellion against the same, or given aid or comfort to the enemies thereof. But Congress may by a vote of two-thirds of each House, remove such disability. • Section 4. The validity of the public debt of the United States, authorized by law, including debts incurred for payment of pensions and bounties for services in suppressing insurrection or rebellion, shall not be questioned. But neither the United States nor any state shall assume or pay any debt or obligation incurred in aid of insurrection or rebellion against the United States, or any claim for the loss or emancipation of any slave; but all such debts, obligations and claims shall be held illegal and void. • Section 5. The Congress shall have power to enforce, by appropriate legislation, the provisions of this article.

  7. Lecture 18 – November 14, 2012 – Republicans (Radicals?) In Charge Who’s in Charge of Congress during Reconstruction? Radicals – Who were they? Congress’s Turn: 1866 – Republican-crafted Legislation. to improve the terms of Reconstruction Renewed Freedmen’s Bureau – Johnson veto – overrode the veto Passed Civil Rights Bill – Johnson veto – overrode the veto Passed 14th Amend. –battle with President over state ratificationWhat does this Amendment do? 11/66 elections – Republicans win; emboldened by big electoral gains --sets the stage for Military Reconstruction Acts of 1867 First Reconstruction Act – Turns southern states into 5 military districts Army Appropriations Act – Subordinating Johnson to Grant in milit. decisions Tenure of Office Act – Limiting changes in civilian personnel [Senate-confm] Second Reconstruction Act – Establishing procedures for registering voters Third Reconstruction Act – Military Personnel Decisions fall to Grant Getting Rid of Johnson Evaluating Various Reconstruction Plans? Was Johnson Incompetent? Were the Radicals Overreaching? Irrational?

  8. Stanton & Tenure of Office Act Grant & Army Appropriations Act Johnson’s troubles with a Congress that legislated more limitations on his power.

  9. “How can I win in ’68?” • Botched attempt to build a centrist coalition; • -too dependent upon Southern cooperation; • too lenient and ineffective to gain the patience • of all Republicans for his “Restoration” plan. • A Democrat at the head of the Republican Party • --did he ever stand a chance? Grant did win in ’68 Was he a Radical? What did he do for a successful Reconstruction?

  10. Fifteenth Amendment • the "right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude."

  11. Lecture 22 – April 27, 2011 – How Radical Was Reconstruction? Part II Congressional Reconstruction: 1866 – legislation. to improve the terms of Reconstruction Passed 14th Amend. –battle with AJ over state ratification 11/66 elections – Republicans emboldened by electoral gains 1867 - Retaking Control of the Confederate States by Force – Radical Rule begins. March 1867 – Military Reconstruction Act – 5 military districts Tenure of Office Act & Army Appropriations ActImpeachment of Andrew Johnson -- violated Tenure of Office Act 8/67 Impeachment Trial March – May 1868 -Senate failed to convict Why? Moderate Republicans and 1868 election A New President – US Grant vs Horatio Seymour Power of Racist Rhetoric in 1868 Reconstruction under Grant? – 15th Amendment – 1869 – ratified 1870 1870 Enforcement Act / KKK Act of 1871 Troubles for Reconstruction: Grant as President – Shifting National Priorities – Divisions among Republicans Continued