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Introduction to Online Course Design
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  1. Introduction to Online Course Design Terri Tarr and Lynn Ward

  2. Objectives By the end of this session, participants will be able to: • describe characteristics of a quality learning experience. • compare their current course design approach to well-known course design models. • write measurable learning objectives. • begin to apply Jump Start Course Design and Development Guidelines to their own courses.

  3. Good Learning Experiences Think back to a time when you were involved in a really good learning experience. • Briefly describe the experience. • What made it so successful?

  4. Discussion • With the group at your table, discuss your good learning • List the elements of that experience on the large post-it paper. • Each group will verbally share the top 3 elements.

  5. Principles for Good Practice in Undergraduate Education (Chickering & Gamson) • Encouraging contact between faculty and students. • Developing reciprocity and cooperation among students. • Using active learning techniques. • Giving prompt feedback. • Emphasizing time on task. • Communicating high expectations. • Respecting diverse talents and ways of learning.

  6. Implementing the Seven Principles: Technology as Lever (Chickering & Ehrman) • Using technology to put the principles of good practice into use. http://www.tltgroup.org/programs/seven.html • TLT 7 principles library of teaching ideas http://www.tltgroup.org/seven/Library_TOC.htm

  7. Jump Start Course Design Guidelines • Built on seven principles • Use guidelines when • Designing and developing your course • Assessing your course • Jump Start course design guidelines (link to and provide print copy) • Apply guidelines to your course

  8. Why is it necessary to design the course? • A course is more than placing material online. • You are not there. • Space, time and money are limited – must use resources wisely. • Others?

  9. What kind of assessment should I use? Does everything I do transfer to the web? Can I cover the same amount of material as in my traditional course? Can I just post my lectures? Should I use a textbook? The CD-ROM from the publisher? Do I have to write everything myself? Online Course Design Questions How much content can I cover? Where do I start?

  10. Course Design Approaches Imagine that you are asked to teach a new course you’ve never taught before. How would you approach designing the course?

  11. Where do your students need to go? What are your goals for the class?

  12. Where do your students need to go? What are your goals for the class?

  13. IDD Triangle: Congruence Objectives Activities Assessment Adapted from Felder & Brent ( 1991)

  14. IDD Triangle: Congruence What should my students know? What should they be able to do? Objectives Activities Assessment Adapted from Felder & Brent ( 1991)

  15. IDD Triangle: Congruence Objectives How will I know that they have achieved the objectives? Activities Assessment Adapted from Felder & Brent ( 1991)

  16. IDD Triangle: Congruence Objectives What type of activities will promote and develop this knowledge? What type of activities can help students achieve the learning objectives? Activities Assessment Adapted from Felder & Brent ( 1991)

  17. Design Process • Integrated course design (Dee Fink) • ADDIE • Dick & Carey • VPODDDA (Waterhouse) • Rapid prototyping

  18. Fink’s Integrated Course Design Learning Goals &Objectives Alignment Teaching & Learning Activities Feedback & Assessment Situational Factors

  19. The ADDIE Design Model

  20. Dick, Carey, & Carey (2001)

  21. VPODDDA (Waterhouse, 2005)

  22. Rapid Prototyping (Tripp & Bichelmeyer, 1990) Assess Needs & Analyze Content Set Objectives Construct Prototype (Design) Utilize Prototype Install and Maintain System

  23. Goals and Objectives: • Goals • Express overall intent • Describe the “big picture” • Objectives • specify in behavioral (measurable) terms what a learner will be able to do, know, or feel as a result of instruction.

  24. Goals versus Objectives

  25. Examples Understands the economic, legal, and social issues surrounding the use of information, and accesses and uses information ethically and legally * By the end of this session, given ten research scenarios, you will be able to recognize when and explain why formal citation is or is not required with 80% accuracy. *ACRL Standards Committee, Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education, 2000

  26. Why Bother with Objectives? • Build a foundation for the course • Organize central course concepts • Provide a map for you and the students • Form the basis for assessment and learning activities • To ensure students acquire the desired knowledge and skills

  27. SMART Objectives S – specific M – measurable A – attainable R – relevant T – timed

  28. ABCD Format A – Audience - Emphasizes the learner point of view NOTthe instructor point of view B – Behavior: Consists of 1) an ACTION verb and 2) the content reference C – Conditions: Specifies the situation within which the expected behavior must occur D – Degree: Specifies minimum performance standards in terms of quality, quantity, or time.

  29. Example By the end of this session, given ten research scenarios, you will be able to recognize when and explain why formal citation is or is not required with 80% accuracy.

  30. For Behavior…Think Bloom’s Taxonomy Higher Order • Lower Order

  31. Examples • Organize the following scores in chronological order and identify the musical period to which each belongs based on their stylistic characteristics • From the following examples, choose the one that best illustrates the specified stylistic characteristic • Propose the likely provenance, composer, function, and date of an anonymous musical score and support your hypothesis with liturgical, paleographical, stylistic, and original archival evidence • Locate one or more examples of each trait in the following musical score Analysis Understand Synthesis Application

  32. Activity • Choose a chapter or module for your course. • What are the learning objectives for this specific content? • Draft objectives, or • Revise current objectives

  33. Jump Start Course Planner

  34. Jump Start Module Planner