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Reform and Renewal in the Christian Church

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  1. Reform and Renewal in the Christian Church

  2. References:A History of Modern Europe by MerrimanA History of the Modern World by Palmer and ColtonA History of Western Society by McKay, Hill, and BucklerThe Western Perspective by Cannistraro and Reich Western Civilization by Spielvogel

  3. Reform and Renewal in the Christian Churchfrom A History of Western Society The Condition of the Church (ca 1400-1517)

  4. Reform and Renewal in the Christian Churchfrom A History of Western Society • The prestige of church leaders suffered due to • Introduction • Conflict between the papacy and the Holy Roman Emperor • The Babylonian Captivity • The Great Schism

  5. Reform and Renewal in the Christian Churchfrom A History of Western Society • Introduction • Church leaders were criticized by • Humanists • Such as Machiavelli • Christian humanists • Such as Erasmus

  6. Reform and Renewal in the Christian Church Declining Prestige of the Church

  7. Reform and Renewal in the Christian Church • The Babylonian Captivity and the Great Schism damaged the church's prestige. • Secular humanists satirized and denounced moral corruption within the church.

  8. Reform and Renewal in the Christian Church • Signs of disorder in the early 16th century • The parish clergy brought spiritual help to the people. • Critics of the church wanted moral and administrative reform in three areas.

  9. Reform and Renewal in the Christian Church • Clerical immorality • The lack of education of the clergy and low standards of ordination • The absenteeism, pluralism and wealth of the greater clergy

  10. Reform and Renewal in the Christian Church • The prelates and popes of the period, often members of the nobility, lived in splendor and moral corruption.

  11. Reform and Renewal in the Christian Church • Signs of vitality in the late 15th and early 16th centuries • 16th Europe remained deeply religious • Calls for reform testify to the spiritual vitality of the church. • New organizations were formed to educate and minister to the poor.

  12. Reform and Renewal in the Christian Church • The Brethren of the Common Life in Holland • lived simply • sought to make religion a personal, inner experience based on following the scriptures.

  13. Reform and Renewal in the Christian Church • The Imitation of Christ by Thomas a Kempis urged Christians to seek perfection in a simple way of life.

  14. Reform and Renewal in the Christian Church • Pope Julius II summoned an ecumenical council on reform in the church called the Lateran Council (1512-1527).

  15. Reform and Renewal in the Christian Church Martin Luther and the Birth of Protestantism

  16. Reform and Renewal in the Christian Church • A German monk and professor of religion whose search for salvation led him to the letters of St. Paul. Luther's early years • Concluded that faith was central to Christianity and the only means of salvation.

  17. Martin LutherbyLucas Cranach the Elder

  18. Reform and Renewal in the Christian Church Luther's Ninety-five Theses (October 1517)

  19. Reform and Renewal in the Christian Church • Luther’s opposition to the sale of indulgences prompted his fight with Rome

  20. Reform and Renewal in the Christian Church • His Ninety-Five Theses raised many theological issues and initiated a long period of debate in Europe • Luther rejected the idea that salvation could be achieved by good works, such as indulgences.

  21. An indulgence was a release from the penalties to be paid for sin. • Luther also criticized papal wealth.

  22. Luther later denied the authority of the pope • Was excommunicated • Was declared an outlaw by Charles V at Worms in 1521.

  23. Charles VbyTitian

  24. Meanwhile, Ulrich Zwingli introduced the reformation in Switzerland.

  25. ZwinglibyHans Asper(c. 1531)

  26. Believed in the supremacy of Scripture • Opposed indulgences, the Mass, monasticism, and clerical celibacy.

  27. Protestant thought • The basic theological tenets of Protestantism were set forth in the Confession of Augsburg, in which Luther provided new answers to four basic theological issues.

  28. He believed that salvation derived through faith alone, not faith and good works. • He stated that religious authority rests with the Bible, not the pope.

  29. He believed that the church consists of the entire community of Christian believers. • He believed that all work is sacred and everyone should serve God in his or her individual vocation.

  30. In addition, he believed that every believer was his or her own priest.

  31. Catholics believe in transubstantiation, Luther in consubstantiation, and Zwingli in the Sacrament as a memorial only.

  32. Protestantism, therefore, was a reformulation of Christian beliefs and practices.

  33. The Social Impact of Luther's Beliefs

  34. By 1521, Luther's religious ideas had a vast following among all social classes.

  35. Luther's ideas were popular because of widespread resentment of clerical privileges and wealth. • Luther's ideas attracted many preachers and they became Protestant leaders. • Peasants cited Luther's theology as part of their demands for economic reforms.

  36. Luther did not support the peasants' revolts; he believed in obedience to civil authority. • Widespread peasant revolts in 1525 were brutally crushed, but some land was returned to common use.

  37. Luther's greatest weapon was his mastery of the language and his words were spread by the advent of printing.

  38. Zwingli and Calvin were greatly influenced by his writings.

  39. The publication of Luther's German translation of the New Testament in 1523 democratized religion.

  40. Catechisms and hymns enabled people, especially the young, to remember central points of doctrine.  

  41. A Sixteenth-Century ClassroombyHans Holbein

  42. Luther's Impact on Women

  43. Luther gave dignity to domestic work, stressed the idea of marriage and the Christian home, ended confession, and encouraged education for girls.

  44. Luther held enlightened views on sex and marriage, although he claimed that women should be no more than efficient wives.

  45. Germany and the Protestant Reformation

  46. The Holy Roman Empire in the 14th and 15th centuries • The Golden Bull of 1356 gave each of the seven electors virtual sovereignty. • Localism and chronic disorder allowed the nobility to strengthen their territories and reduced the authority of the emperor.

  47. The rise of the Habsburg dynasty • The Habsburgs gave unity to much of Europe, especially with the marriage of Maximilian I of Austria and Mary of Burgundy in 1477.

  48. Charles V, their grandson, inherited much of Europe and was committed to the idea of its religious and political unity.

  49. The Political Impact of Luther's Beliefs

  50. The Protestant Reformation stirred nationalistic feelings in Germany against the wealthy Italian papacy.