slide1 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
HTAV PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
HTAV

Loading in 2 Seconds...

  share
play fullscreen
1 / 72
Download Presentation

HTAV - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

marnie
152 Views
Download Presentation

HTAV

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. HTAV • 21 February 2014 • THE FRENCH REVOLUTION: INTERNATIONAL CAUSES AND OUTCOMES • Peter McPhee • University of Melbourne

  2. Perspective I • Slavery and empire in eighteenth-century France and the Americas

  3. Mercantilism/”l’exclusif” St-Domingue - 31,000 whites, 27,500 freed slaves and mulattoes, 465,000 slaves

  4. Nantes

  5. Nantes La Rochelle Bordeaux

  6. Perspective II • The clash of global empires

  7. Jacques Necker Controller-General 1777-81, 1788-89 By Joseph Duplessis

  8. Estates-General 5 May 1789

  9. Declaration of Independence 4 July 1776

  10. “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. • To secure these rights, governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed.” • (American Declaration of Independence, 4 July 1776)

  11. Declaration of the Rights of Man and the Citizen, 27 August 1789 • “1. Men are born and remain free and equal in rights ... • 2. ... these rights are liberty, property, security, and resistance to oppression. • 3. The principle of all sovereignty resides essentially in the nation. No body, or individual may exercise authority that does not expressly emanate from it.”

  12. Perspective III • An international conflagration

  13. Goethe Valmy

  14. Tuileries 10 August 1792

  15. 21 January 1793

  16. Vendée, March 1793 300,000 conscripts

  17. Committee of Public Safety, April 1793 Robespierre July 1793

  18. ‘Levée en masse’ - August 1793

  19. Fleurus – 26 June

  20. Napoleon 1800 David 1803

  21. Perspective IV • Revolutionary emancipation?

  22. Amis des noirs

  23. Grégoire

  24. The National Assembly, 16 May 1791, granting ‘active’ citizen status to free blacks with free parents and the necessary property, but avoiding the issue of slavery: • “The National Assembly decrees that it will never deliberate on the station of people of colour who are not born of free father and mother, without the prior, free and spontaneous wish of the colonies; that the colonial assemblies currently in existence will stay on; but that people of colour born of free father and mother will be admitted to all future parish and colonial assemblies, if they moreover have the required qualities. (The hall echoes with applause).”

  25. May 1791

  26. Barnave Club Massiac

  27. Barnave’s speech to the National Assembly, 15 July 1791 • ‘Any change today is fatal, every prolongation of the Revolution disastrous. I am posing the question here, for it is a question of the national interest. Are we going to end the Revolution, or are we going to start it all over again?... If the Revolution takes one more step, it can only be a dangerous one: if it is in line with liberty its first act could be the destruction of royalty, if it is in line with equality its first act could be an attack on property. ... It is time to bring the Revolution to an end. ... It must stop at the point where the Nation is free and all men are equal • ‘Massacre of the Champ de mars’, 17 July 1791

  28. St-Domingue, August 1791

  29. St-Domingue, 1793

  30. Nantes La Rochelle Bordeaux

  31. 5 February 1794

  32. Type here …

  33. Toussaint L’Ouverture18021804Haiti

  34. Slave trade 1818

  35. Victor Schoelcher Second Republic 1848