Girl Scouts of Southeastern Michigan Outdoor 2 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

girl scouts of southeastern michigan outdoor 2 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Girl Scouts of Southeastern Michigan Outdoor 2 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Girl Scouts of Southeastern Michigan Outdoor 2

play fullscreen
1 / 87
Girl Scouts of Southeastern Michigan Outdoor 2
131 Views
Download Presentation
mariel
Download Presentation

Girl Scouts of Southeastern Michigan Outdoor 2

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Girl Scouts of Southeastern Michigan Outdoor 2

  2. Welcome Welcome to Outdoor 2. This module will prepare you for camping trips when girls sleep out in platform cabins/tent, Adirondacks, A-frames or pitch their own tents. This module will take about 2 hours to complete. If you don’t have time to finish it in one sitting, that’s okay. Just make note of the last page you accessed (page numbers are on the bottom right of each slide) and continue from there. 2

  3. Welcome • During this home study course, you will need access to • the following documents: • Safety Activity Checkpoints:  Group Camping (pp 109-112), Outdoor Cooking (pp 119-123) and Trip/Travel Camping (pp 124-128) http://www.gssemhub.org/sites/default/files/document/all_safety_activity_checkpoints_2011.pdf • Volunteer Essentials, Part 2: The Program (Traveling with Girls section). http://www.gssemhub.org/sites/default/files/document/The%20Girl%20Scout%20Leadership%20Experience%20sept%201%202013.pdf • Volunteer Essentials, Part 3: Safety. http://www.gssemhub.org/sites/default/files/document/Safety%20Guidelines%20sept%201%202013.pdf • Please be patient when downloading files; it may take a few minutes. 3

  4. Welcome You will be asked to complete a learning log as you move through this module. Please refer back to your “course confirmation email” for the link to access your Learning Log. Either save it on your computer or print it and complete it by hand. Learning log questions will be identified with this graphic: Complete the learning log and forward it to: GSSEM Attn: Adult Learning 3011 West Grand Blvd 500 Fisher Bldg Detroit, MI 48202 Or you can fax to 313-870-2600; Or email to agunderson@gssem.org To receive credit for this course, you must submit your completed Learning Log. 4

  5. Course Objectives • By the end of this course, • participants will be able to: • Use the Girl Scout Leadership Experience to plan and execute a camping experience when girls sleep and cook outside of a building. • Determine the readiness of individual girls and the group to participate in this type of camping experience. • Direct girls in the planning and implementation of a camping experience following all Girl Scout policies, procedures, guidelines and Safety Activity Checkpoints. 5

  6. Course Objectives • Prepare girls to use outdoor personal hygiene skills using water, wells, latrine and “catholes”. • Make girls aware of harmful insects, animals, snakes, and plants. • Tie knots that are necessary for tent camping. • Demonstrate their understanding of use and care of established units and pitching a complete tent unit. • Instruct the girls on Leave No Trace principles • and going “green”. 6

  7. Introduction While camping isn’t a required activity in Girl Scouting, it’s a great opportunity for girls to gain confidence, develop character, learn new skills, and explore new ways to make the world a better place. Sleeping and cooking outside of a building gives girls the opportunity to explore our world and enjoy & care for its resources. GSSEM provides many camp program opportunities for all grade levels. Girls can camp with their troop/group, girls from their community and attend summer camping experiences on their own. Check out the “Camp” section of our website (www.gssem.org) for more information. When your girls are ready, let them choose where to reach outside of GSSEM for a meaningful camping experience (a campground in Michigan, the United States, Canada, etc. ?). The imaginations of the girls are the only limits! 7

  8. What are the benefits for girls? Can you think of other ways that camping experiences can benefit girls? Can you think of any badges or awards that girls could earn while preparing for their camp experience or while at camp? 8

  9. Your responsibilities after completing this course Title Goes Here • Prepare girls to successfully and safely experience a camping event while sleeping and cooking outside a building. • Ensure troop/group is emotionally ready to go camping • Ensure event is the right length, and is appropriate for the grade level of the girls, to be of benefit • Ensure troop/group has had time to work on planning and that plans are in accord with Volunteer Essentials and Safety Activity Checkpoints • Ensure that some of the activities selected by the girls enable them to develop values associated with their impact on the environment • Ensure that camping events are inclusive – that all girls have the same opportunity to participate in all the activities 9

  10. Review of previous material Some of the information in this course is a partial review of information that was presented in Trip & Camp Readiness. There are a couple of reasons for this: • It may have been quite a while since you completed Trip & Camp Readiness; this review can refresh your memory. • You may have taken Trip & Camp Readiness to prepare for a simple overnight trip and now you are planning a more advanced outdoor activity with girls. • In many cases, the information has been expanded to address the specific needs of a troop/group that is planning a more advanced outdoor experience. Please DO review this material with new eyes. You and your girls are progressing together to be ready and able to plan & participate in an awesome new camping experience! 10

  11. Girl Scout Leadership Experience (GSLE) The focus of the program (creating girls of courage, confidence and character who make the world a better place) is fueled by 15 short-term and intermediate outcomes. It is ignited by three keys – Discover, Connect and Take Action – and it runs on three processes – Girl-led, Cooperative Learning and Learn by Doing. The Girl Scout Leadership Experience is the driving force - THE ENGINE – for everything we do. 11

  12. It’s What We Do! It’s simple. Everythingwe do with the girls starts with the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. Everyactivity should: • involve at least one of the three keys (discover, connect, take action) - and • incorporate the processes (girl-led, learning by doing, cooperative learning). On the following pages, you will explore how camping experiences can incorporate the Girl Scout Leadership Experience. 12

  13. Girl Scout Leadership Experienceat Camp (1) Introduction (cont’d) • GIRLS DISCOVER What is something a girl could Discover for herself while sleeping and cooking outside of a building? Troops/Groups are also encouraged to explore the travel opportunities outside of GSSEM’s jurisdiction appropriate for their troop/group grade level. For older girls planning a trip, traveling throughout the US or even visiting other countries would be a great Girl Scout experience! • Plan and Measure Discover • Fill in at least 3 rows on the Discover Outcomes chart. 13 8

  14. Girl Scout Leadership Experienceat Camp (2) Introduction (cont’d) • GIRLS CONNECT How can girls Connect during a camping experience? Plan and Measure Connect Fill in at least 3 rows on the Connect Outcomes chart. Troops/Groups are also encouraged to explore the travel opportunities outside of GSSEM’s jurisdiction appropriate for their troop/group grade level. For older girls planning a trip, traveling throughout the US or even visiting other countries would be a great Girl Scout experience! 14 8

  15. Girl Scout Leadership Experience at Camp (3) Introduction (cont’d) • GIRLS TAKE ACTION How can girls Take Action in the outdoors or when camping? Plan and Measure Take Action Fill in at least 3 rows on the Take Action Outcomes chart. Troops/Groups are also encouraged to explore the travel opportunities outside of GSSEM’s jurisdiction appropriate for their troop/group grade level. For older girls planning a trip, traveling throughout the US or even visiting other countries would be a great Girl Scout experience! 15 8

  16. Remember the processes! Introduction (cont’d) Troops/Groups are also encouraged to explore the travel opportunities outside of GSSEM’s jurisdiction appropriate for their troop/group grade level. For older girls planning a trip, traveling throughout the US or even visiting other countries would be a great Girl Scout experience! Girl-led • Cooperative learning • Learning by doing 16 8

  17. The girls benefit from doing the work themselves. So, let them (girl-led) work together (cooperative learning) to learn (learn by doing) about how to take care of themselves in the out-of-doors. They may make some mistakes along the way --- but the lessons will be valuable and provide the best benefit to the girls! Introduction (cont’d) Troops/Groups are also encouraged to explore the travel opportunities outside of GSSEM’s jurisdiction appropriate for their troop/group grade level. For older girls planning a trip, traveling throughout the US or even visiting other countries would be a great Girl Scout experience! 17 8

  18. A Job for Every Girl Every girl is assigned tasks that she completes. The role of adults is To supervise and answer questions – NOT to do the girls’ jobs. Have the girls form groups (patrols) to complete their tasks. Rotate tasks throughout the trip through use of a Kaper chart. Modify it as necessary for the group’s size and activities. (See sample types of jobs - called kapers - on the next page.) 18

  19. Sample Kapers for Camp • Wood Gatherer/Fire Tender • Gather needed firewood or prepare heat source for cooking • Lay fire, light and tend campfire for cooking & cleanup • Extinguish fire or clean/store other heat source • Cook • Review menu and recipes • Gather/prepare food and set it up for easy access and cooking • Cook food according to recipe • Dishwashers • Prepare dish line and call groups to dish line • Wash any preparation dishes • Store all leftover food and dispose of waste • Unit Housekeepers • Insure orderly, usable handwashing area • Clean latrine area • Properly dispose of garbage 19

  20. Trip Readiness Progression – From Volunteer Essentials, Part 2: The Program (Traveling with Girls Section) List one item from the checklist above that really stands out that to you. 20

  21. Progression Transitioning from Adult-Led to Girl-Led Adult-Led Adult-Planned Adult Responsibilities It begins with the first experience away from the troop meeting place and progresses to more advanced camping and trips. The responsible adult must take the training appropriate for the planned experience. Allow enough time to teach new skills to the girls prior to the activity. Outdoor education emphasizes teaching the girls the skills they need to have a positive outdoor experience. Girl-Led Girl-Planned Girl Responsibilities Senior Daisy Brownie Junior Cadette Ambassador 21

  22. (Progression) It starts slowly… 22

  23. (Progression)…and then it soars! 23

  24. What steps have you and your girls made in Progression for the outdoors? What “Look Out” activities have we done? What “Meet Out” activities have we done ? What “Move Out” activities have we done? What “Explore Out” activities have we done ? What “Sleep Out” activities have we done? Are you and your girls ready to “Cook Out”? “Camp Out”? “Pack Out”? 24

  25. Progression at GSSEM Camps Council Sponsored Summer Camp This is an outdoor experience for an individual girl. A girl chooses activities planned and delivered by GSSEM camp staff and eats meals in the dining hall. Facility Rental Camp activities are planned and delivered by the troop/group. The troop/group cooks all their own meals. Community Sponsored Weekend Camp Activities are planned by a Community (older girls & adults). At Camp Hawthorn Hollow & Innisfree, meals are provided in dining halls. At Playfair community volunteers & girls cook their meals. Council Sponsored Weekend Camp Activities are planned and delivered by GSSEM camp staff. Meals provided in dining halls. 25

  26. Trip & Camp Readiness Ask yourself and the girls: • Are the girls ready for an advanced camping experience? • Are you ready? • Have you given yourself and the girls enough time to prepare/plan? • Are you including your parents/guardians in the planning? • Are there special trainings or procedures that are required for this type of camping experience? • Hint: Refer to Group Camping (pp 109-112) and Trip Travel Camping (pp 124-128) Safety Activity Checkpoints. • What advance preparation needs to be done to • prepare the girls for this camping activity? How long • will that take? Have we planned other activities that have Safety Activity Checkpoints? 26

  27. Safety Policies, Procedures & Guidelines Review Volunteer Essentials, Part 3: Safety for the trip as well as the activities planned. You are responsible for keeping the girls safe. When planning trips/activities you must review and follow the guidelines as stated in the Safety Activity Checkpoints. List one item from Volunteer Essentials, Part 3: Safety or the Safety Activity Checkpoints that was new information to you. Involve the girls in the use of Safety Activity Checkpoints • When working with Daisies and Brownies, read the information to the girls. • Juniors will look at it with you. For example, they might say, “Can we go….” and your response is, “Let’s check the Safety Activity Checkpoints.” • Cadettes, Seniors, & Ambassadors should be able to review the Safety Activity Checkpoints with their advisors. 27

  28. Safety Policies, Procedures & Guidelines Travel by Automobile Introduction (cont’d) Troops/Groups are also encouraged to explore the travel opportunities outside of GSSEM’s jurisdiction appropriate for their troop/group grade level. For older girls planning a trip, traveling throughout the US or even visiting other countries would be a great Girl Scout experience! Most likely, your trip will involve travel by automobile. Review Volunteer Essentials, Part 3; Safety. Pay close attention to guidelines and policies related to transporting girls and Girl Scout Activity Insurance in the ICE Toolkit section. What can you, as a troop/group leader, do to help create a safe travel space for the girls? 28 8

  29. Safety Policies, Procedures & Guidelines Each group should carry a first aid kit adapted to the kinds of activities that will take place during the camp experience. The contents of the kit will vary according to its intended use and the size of the group. The American Cross has suggestions; check out the Anatomy of a First Aid Kit. What items should be in your first aid kit? How will you involve the girls? What first aid skills are important for your girls to learn? Safety Planning with Girls Make sure they know the obvious – don’t assume: • Who is the first aider for this camping experience? • What does the first aider do for us? • How to summon help in an emergency • How to treat basic injuries until help is available • Where the first aid kit is kept, during transit and at destination. 29

  30. Safety Policies, Procedures & Guidelines • Medications & Safety • Refer to Volunteer Essentials, Part 3: Safety • ALL medications should be in original containers and prescribed • doses should be given by a responsible adult (usually the first aider) based on written permission of a parent or guardian • Inhalers and other self-administered medications can remain with the girls with the leader’s advance knowledge • This applies to ingested or topical medications – do not give prescription or over-the-counter remedies to girls without parent permission. Additional Notes for You and Your First Aider Be aware of girl health issues/special needs Allergies Triggers Reactions Treatment Be aware of the energy level of the girls and balance the activities. Too much stimulation leads to fatigue - leads to injury. Too little stimulation leads to boredom - leads to injury. 30

  31. Safety Policies, Procedures & Guidelines • General Safety Rules ---- • The buddy system should be in effect at ALL times. • Even better (in case of emergency), travel in groups of • three or four. • All the girls should know your count-off system and, if appropriate, remember their numbers. • Remind them to watch out for each other and alert an adult if there is a concern! • If Lost - Hug a tree • Stay by a tree – don’t wander looking for group • (The troop/group will be looking for the girl!) • Yell – use a whistle – make loud noises • If you give each girl a garbage bag at the beginning of the hike it can be used protect the girl from the elements . 31

  32. Emergency Preparedness General Precautions Before you arrive, check with the authorities where you will be camping to learn their procedures for emergencies. Pack a battery-powered radio that’s tuned to a local station that broadcasts weather information and extra batteries. Pack a battery-powered flashlight, extra batteries and an extra bulb. When you first arrive on site, locate emergency exits and/or sheltered areas for safety from fire, storm and tornadoes. Store important papers in a ziplock baggie and keep them handy. STAY CALM! Understanding the potential dangers and preparing for them will help you and the girls keep a cool head if you encounter an emergency. For more information on prevention and what to do in case of emergencies, visit the Federal Emergency Management Agency website (www.fema.gov) 32

  33. Emergency Preparedness Forest Fires Before you leave, check local conditions for fire danger and active fires in the area. Don't intentionally put yourself in harms way by trying to see or photograph wildfire. Don't enter an area that has been closed to camping or hiking due to fire danger. Ensure girls know what to do in case a person catches on fire -- STOP – DROP – ROLL. Hold fire drills during meetings and on arrival at site. If advised to evacuate, do so immediately. Know your evacuation route ahead of time and prepare an evacuation checklist and emergency supplies. If you get caught in a forest fire Don't try to outrun the blaze; look for a body of water such as a pond or river to crouch in. If there is no water nearby, find a depressed, cleared area with little vegetation, lie low to the ground, and cover your body with wet clothing, a blanket, or soil. Stay low and covered until the fire passes. Protect your lungs by breathing air closest to the ground, through a moist cloth, if possible, to avoid inhaling smoke. 33

  34. Emergency Preparedness • Thunder and Lightning Storms • You are cooking dinner when you hear distant rumbles of thunder. Your tent and a large open sided picnic shelter are nearby. Your vehicle is about quarter of a mile away parked at the trail head. What should you do? Go to your vehicle! The tent and picnic shelter are NOT safe places. Wait 30 minutes until after the last rumble of thunder before going back to the campsite. • Remember, there is NO safe place outside in a thunderstorm. If you absolutely can't get to safety, here are some suggestions: • Avoid open fields, the top of a hill or a ridge top. • Stay away from tall, isolated trees or other tall objects. If you are in a forest, stay near a lower stand of trees. • If you are camping in an open area, set up camp in a valley, ravine or other low area. Remember, a tent offers NO protection from lightning. • Stay away from water, wet items (such as ropes) and metal objects (such as fences and poles). Water and metal are excellent conductors of electricity. The current from a lightning flash will easily travel for long distances 34

  35. Emergency Preparedness • Tornado • You can survive a tornado! Even in the heart of tornado alley, chances are you will never experience a direct hit by a tornado. • However, being prepared is critical. By following these simple guidelines, you can protect yourself. • Ask the park ranger or campground owner if there are any shelters available for use. Cabins may offer limited protection from a weak tornado, but succumb quickly as the wind speeds increase. • If you are caught outside with no buildings available, the best option is to find the lowest spot in the ground and lay flat, covering your head (use pillows, blankets, coats, helmets, etc) to protect your head and body from flying debris. 35

  36. Review of Safety Policies, Procedures & Guidelines Emergency Preparedness Introduction (cont’d) What can you and your girls do to prepare for emergencies before the camping trip? What are some important things to do as you first arrive at your campsite to help ensure the safety of your troop/group? Troops/Groups are also encouraged to explore the travel opportunities outside of GSSEM’s jurisdiction appropriate for their troop/group grade level. For older girls planning a trip, traveling throughout the US or even visiting other countries would be a great Girl Scout experience! 36 8

  37. Safety Policies, Procedures & Guidelines Introduction (cont’d) • Poisonous Plants • Troup/Group leaders and girls need to be aware • of the poisonous plants that they may encounter in the outdoors. • Read “Poisonous Plants” from Wilderness Survival and “The Don’t Touch Me Plants” from Purdue University. • The Department of Natural Resources for each state will also have information on poisonous plants. In Michigan, go to: http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/ to learn more. • How can you share this information with your girls? • What new information did you learn from the articles? Troops/Groups are also encouraged to explore the travel opportunities outside of GSSEM’s jurisdiction appropriate for their troop/group grade level. For older girls planning a trip, traveling throughout the US or even visiting other countries would be a great Girl Scout experience! 37 8

  38. Safety Policies, Procedures & Guidelines • Poisonous & Dangerous Insects • Troup/Group leaders and girls need to be aware of the • poisonous and dangerous insects that they may • encounter in the outdoors. • Read “Dangerous Insects and Arachnids” from Wilderness Survival • and “Biting Bugs” from the USDA Forest Service. • The Department of Natural Resources for each state will also have information on dangerous insects. In Michigan, go to: http://www.michigan.gov/dnr/ to learn more. • What insects will be in the area where you and your girls • will be camping? How will you prepare for exposure to • these insects? 38

  39. Safety Policies, Procedures & Guidelines A Word about Ticks Ticks are known to transmit infection from animals to people and person to person, such as Lyme Disease. They burrow under the skin and are often difficult to see unless you’re looking for the tell-tale signs. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has information about the prevention and removal of ticks. Share the article with your girls! 39

  40. Safety Policies, Procedures & Guidelines Coyotes and Raccoons and Bears ---- Oh My! Since you and your girls will be camping in the great outdoors, you will be in the “living room” of many animals. As always, it is important to be safe and prepared. Read “Wildlife Safety Precautions” from the California State Compensations Insurance Fund and “Hiking Safety: Encountering Predators on the Trail” from Go Pet Friendly. What wild animals might you and your girls encounter? How should you react to these encounters? 40

  41. Safety Policies, Procedures & Guidelines What about Snakes? Do we have to worry about poisonous snakes in Michigan? What about the rest of North America? For answers to these questions and more --- Read “Venomous Snakes” from Backyard Nature and “FAQ: Snakes” from Michigan State University. 41

  42. Finding Your Way Introduction (cont’d) Which way is North? The movement of the sun can illuminate your way true north. In the Northern Hemisphere, the sun always rises in the east and sets in the west. At noon, it looms in the middle of the horizon and directly south. That means when you're facing the sun at noon, walking directly toward it will take you south. Walking with the sun at your back means you're heading north. Troops/Groups are also encouraged to explore the travel opportunities outside of GSSEM’s jurisdiction appropriate for their troop/group grade level. For older girls planning a trip, traveling throughout the US or even visiting other countries would be a great Girl Scout experience! 42 8

  43. Finding Your Way Which way is North? In the Northern Hemisphere, the North Star, or Polaris, guides you true north. You can find Polaris by first locating the Big Dipper and Little Dipper constellations. Draw an imaginary line from the two "pointer stars" at the base of the bowl of the Big Dipper to the last and brightest star in the handle of the Little Dipper. Polaris is also the middle star in the 'M'- shaped neighboring constellation, Cassiopeia. 43

  44. Finding Your Way Map and Compass / Orienteering Even in this high-tech GPS era, nothing replaces the value of a magnetized compass, a paper map and the understanding of how both can help you find your way in the wilderness. Check out the following articles and videos to learn more: http://www.rei.com/learn/expert-advice/navigation-basics.html http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3mtZDBJTb0E http://www.backcountryattitude.com/navigation_map_compass.html http://www.michigano.org/ http://www.4orienteering.com/ There’s also a Girl Scout Safety Activity Checkpoint for Orienteering: https://www.gssem.org/resources/Safety%20Activity%20Checkpoints/Orienteering_Safety_Activity_Checkpoints_2010.pdf 44

  45. Finding Your Way Geocachingis a free, real-world outdoor treasure hunt. Players try to locate hidden containers (called geocaches) using a smart phone or GPS and can then share their experience online. For more details on this new outdoor activity, check out the following website: http://www.geocaching.com/ Also review Girl Scout Safety Activity Checkpoints for Geocaching (pp 77-79): http://www.gssemhub.org/sites/default/files/document/all_safety_activity_checkpoints_2011.pdf 45

  46. Personal Hygiene at Camp Introduction (cont’d) • Good health habits are particularly important when • camping. Remind girls to brush their teeth, wash their • hands and face, and shower or wash with a cloth. • Other tips: • Change clothes (including under garments) totally before going to bed to make sure you will not be chilled during the night. • Baby wipes, wet one, etc. can be used for bathing purposes when no water is available. • Use a wash basin away from the campsite area for washing. • Bring sufficient clothing so that doing laundry is not necessary. Limited washing may be done by setting up bucket for washing and rinsing. Hang clothes on a line strung away from foot traffic areas. If heavier washing of a large quantity of clothing is necessary, schedule time to go to a laundromat. Troops/Groups are also encouraged to explore the travel opportunities outside of GSSEM’s jurisdiction appropriate for their troop/group grade level. For older girls planning a trip, traveling throughout the US or even visiting other countries would be a great Girl Scout experience! 46 8

  47. Personal Hygiene at Camp Introduction (cont’d) Restrooms If composting or flush toilets or latrines are provided at the site, girls should clean them daily as part of their kapers (unless a cleaning service is provided). Replenish paper supplies, sweep the floor, clean sinks, and disinfect toilet seats. Showers In established units, use the showers provided. Conserve water and take short showers. Rinse, turn off the shower and lather up, then turn on the shower for the final rinse. If a cleaning service is not provided, include daily cleaning of shower with a disinfectant on the group kaper chart. *Note: Use biodegradable soap when possible, hand sanitizer, or liquid soap in a pump container. Troops/Groups are also encouraged to explore the travel opportunities outside of GSSEM’s jurisdiction appropriate for their troop/group grade level. For older girls planning a trip, traveling throughout the US or even visiting other countries would be a great Girl Scout experience! 47 8

  48. Personal Hygiene at Camp Introduction (cont’d) Hand Pumps and Wells Make sure to keep hands and fingers at the end of the pump handle. This will avoid pinching fingers or hands in the joint of the handle and the pump stem. DO NOT put anything down the pump area. No washing dishes, hair, brushing teeth, garbage/food scrapings, etc. at the pump area. The disposal of used water and other waste must be 200 feet from natural water sources. Troops/Groups are also encouraged to explore the travel opportunities outside of GSSEM’s jurisdiction appropriate for their troop/group grade level. For older girls planning a trip, traveling throughout the US or even visiting other countries would be a great Girl Scout experience! 48 8

  49. Personal Hygiene at Camp • If no latrine is available, • use a cat hole. • Dig 6-8 inch deep hole. • 200 feet from water source, camp and trails. • Cover when done with dirt and leaves if possible. • Dispose of used toilet paper and feminine hygiene products. (in plastic lined paper bags) 49

  50. Personal Hygiene at Camp Ecology minded campers and Leave No Trace, Inc. recommended that you dump waste water and make catholes at least 200 feet from water sources and trails. This is so that those water sources do not become contaminated. So ---- Where to dump waste water when camping? How far you have to go to make that cathole? Just how far is 200 ft.? It's 66.67 yards or 2/3 the length of a football field. Still no clue? Try the 200 Feet Activity! You will need: Enough balls of 200 ft. of string according to how many are in the troop/group and lots of room to walk. What to do: The troop/group can be divided into groups of 4 to 6. Have half of group can walk the guestimate of 200 ft. and stay there. Then have the other half walk with the string unwinding to the end of the 200 ft. ball of string while an adult or non-participating member holds beginning of string at the “campsite”. 50