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What does the Future hold for Young People?

What does the Future hold for Young People?

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What does the Future hold for Young People?

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  1. What does the Future hold for Young People? How Young People Are Faring 2009 Dr Lucas Walsh, CEAV , 16 March 2010

  2. Overview • About The Foundation for Young Australians • The impact of the economic downturn on young Australians • The BIG Picture • Concluding remarks: • Joined-up approaches • Youth participation • Thinking globally and acting globally: the common good as necessity

  3. Our stakeholders • Young people aged 12–24 represent one fifth of the Australian population • One in five Australians are aged 12–24 years • Two in three 12–19-year-olds live at home with two parents (66%), and a further 20% live with one parent

  4. How young people are faring • The impact of the economic downturn on young Australians • 11th edition of How Young People are Faring • Key question: What has been the impact of the global economic downturn on young Australians?

  5. Prior to the GFC, youth unemployment (15 to 24) was lowest recorded level since the 1970s. • 2008 to 2009, the proportion of teenagers not learning or earning full-time jumped from 13.4 per cent to 16.4 per cent • Highest level since the recession of the early 1990s. • unemployment among teenagers rose by over 6 per cent, one of the largest annual increases for this group over the last 20 years. • Young males have been particularly affected.

  6. Earning and learning among teenagers 15 to 19 year-olds

  7. Earning and learning activities of teenagers • 70% in full-time study • more females (72%) than males (67%) • 14% in full-time work • more males (18%) than females (10%)

  8. 16% of teenagers are not in full-time education or full-time work • Marginalisation greater among females (18%) than males (15%) • more females than males in part-time work, not in the labour force • but higher unemployment among males • If not in full-time education, withdrawal from labour force (hidden unemployment) twice as high for females (20%) as males (9%)

  9. Reversal of previous downward trend: percentage of teenagers not fully engaged rose sharply in 2009 Source: ABS Labour Force Survey (2009)

  10. Percentage of teenagers not fully engaged rose sharply in 2009 • Due to downturn in labour market, with no offsetting increase in educational participation • Full-time work declined (to 13.9%) • Unemployment jumped (to 4.8%) • especially for males (5.4%) • Educational participation flattened • Non-school: unchanged (18.2%) • School: slight fall (51.9% to 51.4%) Source: ABS Labour Force Australia (2008)

  11. Apprenticeships as training pathway for teenagers • Percentage of teenagers in training increased over last decade, but stalled in 2008 • 9% of teenagers in training in 2008 • 12% of males, 6% of females • Shift towards part-time training • Full-time training declined as percentage of total commencements (71% in 2004, 64% in 2008)

  12. Engaging in education, training and work SCHOOL LEAVERS (aged 15-24)

  13. Percentage of school leavers not fully engaged jumped in 2009 Source: ABS Labour Force Australia (2009)

  14. Year 12 completion increases the likelihood of further study • After leaving school in 2007 • 66% of Year 12 completers went to full-time or part-time study in 2008 • 40% of Year 11 completers did so Source: ABS Education and Work, Australia (2008)

  15. Satisfaction with aspects of life, young adults • Young adults in full-time work much more likely to be very happy about • career prospects • standard of living • future • life as a whole compared with part-time workers, unemployed, or not in the labour force

  16. Satisfaction with aspects of life, 24 year-olds Source: LSAY 1998 cohort

  17. The BIG PICTURE • Understanding risk across the life-course • Economic challenges: disengagement from earning and learning • Demographic change • Environmental change • Political disengagement and ‘informal participation’ • Social inclusion: homophobia, racism and mental illness • One in every hundred young person is homeless • Youth voice • The common good as necessity

  18. Conclusions • 16% of teenagers and 25% of young adults are not engaged in full-time earning or learning in 2009 • Sharp rises since 2008 in percentages not fully engaged due to lower full-time employment and higher unemployment • Early school leavers are at greater and ongoing risk of labour force marginalisation • Global factors • Individual, school and policy level change • Smooth transitions more often involve education and training • Wellbeing of young people is linked to their study and work situation

  19. Conclusions • Single one off interventions are not enough (Scott 2008) • Do we really want to listen? • Extending pathways • Joined-up approaches • To blame young people is convenient: why we need youth participation at the centre • Thinking globally and acting globally: the common good as necessity

  20. lucas.walsh@fya.org.auVisit www.fya.org.au 16 March 2010