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Why is Illinois famous? PowerPoint Presentation
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Why is Illinois famous?

Why is Illinois famous?

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Why is Illinois famous?

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  1. Identity Formation and Possible Selves:Becoming a Self-Regulated Learner in MathematicsAlan ZollmanNorthern Illinois UniversitySchool Science and Mathematics Association108th Annual Convention – October 23, 2009Reno, NV

  2. "I'm beginning to understand myself. But it would have been great to be able to understand myself when I was 20 rather than when I was 82." ~ Dave Brubeck, American jazz pianist

  3. Why is Illinois famous?

  4. Because of our basketball players?

  5. our senators?

  6. our governors?

  7. Question 1: As a lieutenant you need to get a 40-foot telephone pole raised. You have 5 privates and 1 sergeant. Specifically, how do you get the pole raised properly?

  8. Question 2: When you were in the first grade, what did you plan to be?

  9. Question 2: When you were in the first grade, what did you plan to be? WHY?

  10. Question 3: If you grow up, where do you plan to be?

  11. Question 3: If you grow up, where do you plan to be? WHY?

  12. Why, in one class, do we have some students mathematically achieve, and other students in the same class with similar aptitude and background do not? What is that one attribute we cannot put a finger on that is the difference between these students?

  13. Why, in one class, do we have some students mathematically achieve, and other students in the same class with similar aptitude and background do not? What is that one attribute we cannot put a finger on that is the difference between these students? I say the major influence is self identity.

  14. Students’ Development Physical Development

  15. Students’ Development Physical Development Social Development

  16. Students’ Development Physical Development Social Development Cognitive Development

  17. Students’ Development Physical Development Social Development Cognitive Development Identity Development

  18. Identity Formation Identity formation is the fundamental development task of psychological maturity

  19. Identity Formation Identity formation is the fundamental development task of psychological maturity Identity formation is a striving to achieve a unified, integrated sense of self.

  20. Identity Formation Identity formation is the fundamental development task of psychological maturity Identity formation is a striving to achieve a unified, integrated sense of self. This requires the incorporation of past and present identifications with significant others, recognition of one’s aptitudes and skills, and occupational goals and aspirations.

  21. Identity Formation Identity is how we respond to the environmental, cognitive, and social affects in our lives.

  22. Identity Formation Identity is how we respond to the environmental, cognitive, and social affects in our lives. All affective domain topics—motivation, persistence, self-esteem, self-confidence, attitude, even behavior—are outcomes of our personal identity.

  23. Identity Formation Identity is how we respond to the environmental, cognitive, and social affects in our lives. All affective domain topics—motivation, persistence, self-esteem, self-confidence, attitude, even behavior—are outcomes of our personal identity. Forming one’s identity is as important as developing one’s social skills or cognitive abilities.

  24. Eight Psychosocial Stages trust versus mistrust, in infancy;

  25. Eight Psychosocial Stages trust versus mistrust, in infancy; Main Question: "Is my world predictable and supportive?”

  26. Eight Psychosocial Stages trust versus mistrust, in infancy; autonomy versus shame and doubt, in toddlers;

  27. Eight Psychosocial Stages trust versus mistrust, in infancy; autonomy versus shame and doubt, in toddlers; Main Question: "Can I do things myself or must I always rely on others?”

  28. Eight Psychosocial Stages trust versus mistrust, in infancy; autonomy versus shame and doubt, in toddlers; initiative versus guilt, in early childhood;

  29. Eight Psychosocial Stages trust versus mistrust, in infancy; autonomy versus shame and doubt, in toddlers; initiative versus guilt, in early childhood; Main Question: "Am I good or am I bad?”

  30. Eight Psychosocial Stages trust versus mistrust, in infancy; autonomy versus shame and doubt, in toddlers; initiative versus guilt, in early childhood; industry versus inferiority, in middle childhood;

  31. Eight Psychosocial Stages trust versus mistrust, in infancy; autonomy versus shame and doubt, in toddlers; initiative versus guilt, in early childhood; industry versus inferiority, in middle childhood; Main Question: "Am I successful or worthless?”

  32. Eight Psychosocial Stages trust versus mistrust, in infancy; autonomy versus shame and doubt, in toddlers; initiative versus guilt, in early childhood; industry versus inferiority, in middle childhood; identity versus role diffusion, in adolescence;

  33. Eight Psychosocial Stages trust versus mistrust, in infancy; autonomy versus shame and doubt, in toddlers; initiative versus guilt, in early childhood; industry versus inferiority, in middle childhood; identity versus role diffusion, in adolescence; Main Question: "Who am I and where am I going?”

  34. Eight Psychosocial Stages trust versus mistrust, in infancy; autonomy versus shame and doubt, in toddlers; initiative versus guilt, in early childhood; industry versus inferiority, in middle childhood; identity versus role diffusion, in adolescence; intimacy versus isolation, in young adulthood;

  35. Eight Psychosocial Stages trust versus mistrust, in infancy; autonomy versus shame and doubt, in toddlers; initiative versus guilt, in early childhood; industry versus inferiority, in middle childhood; identity versus role diffusion, in adolescence; intimacy versus isolation, in young adulthood; Main Question: "Am I loved and wanted?" or "Shall I share my life with someone or live alone?”

  36. Eight Psychosocial Stages trust versus mistrust, in infancy; autonomy versus shame and doubt, in toddlers; initiative versus guilt, in early childhood; industry versus inferiority, in middle childhood; identity versus role diffusion, in adolescence; intimacy versus isolation, in young adulthood; generativity versus stagnation, in middle adult life;

  37. Eight Psychosocial Stages trust versus mistrust, in infancy; autonomy versus shame and doubt, in toddlers; initiative versus guilt, in early childhood; industry versus inferiority, in middle childhood; identity versus role diffusion, in adolescence; intimacy versus isolation, in young adulthood; generativity versus stagnation, in middle adult life; Main Question: "Will I produce something of real value?”

  38. Eight Psychosocial Stages trust versus mistrust, in infancy; autonomy versus shame and doubt, in toddlers; initiative versus guilt, in early childhood; industry versus inferiority, in middle childhood; identity versus role diffusion, in adolescence; intimacy versus isolation, in young adulthood; generativity versus stagnation, in middle adult life; integrity versus despair, in old age (Erikson, 1950).

  39. Eight Psychosocial Stages trust versus mistrust, in infancy; autonomy versus shame and doubt, in toddlers; initiative versus guilt, in early childhood; industry versus inferiority, in middle childhood; identity versus role diffusion, in adolescence; intimacy versus isolation, in young adulthood; generativity versus stagnation, in middle adult life; integrity versus despair, in old age (Erikson, 1950). Main Question: "Have I lived a full life?”

  40. Identity Crisis Identity crisis occurs when the adolescent attempts to integrate childhood identification with ideas about what one wants to be and become as an adult.

  41. Identity Crisis Identity crisis occurs when the adolescent attempts to integrate childhood identification with ideas about what one wants to be and become as an adult. Adolescents initiate identity work as they begin to think about their competencies and attributes, academic and occupational goals, and personal beliefs.

  42. Identity Crisis Identity crisis occurs when the adolescent attempts to integrate childhood identification with ideas about what one wants to be and become as an adult. Adolescents initiate identity work as they begin to think about their competencies and attributes, academic and occupational goals, and personal beliefs. School and peers are important social contexts where much identity work occurs.

  43. Possible selves are influenced by social, cultural and historical contexts that surround the individual and function to generate feelings of competence (when a goal is attained), self-efficacy (beliefs about one’s personal competence in mathematics), and personal control (what one can do to achieve a hoped-for self).

  44. Possible Selves Theory is a theoretical foundation to promote teachers’ understanding of identity formation—their students’ and their own. Possible selves are one’s ideas about what one can become in the future. These perceptions of one’s future self can be highly motivating to students. When students have clear ideas about what they want to become, they are more willing to put forth the effort needed to attain their goals.

  45. Hoped-for possible selves, in particular, are strong predictors of mathematics achievement. A hoped-for self that is concrete, realistic, detailed, and invokes necessary strategies for achieving the goal that will guide student behavior and produce the intended results over time (Oyserman & Markus, 1990).

  46. When students feel committed to, and invested in, working towards the attainment of hoped-for selves, and when they connect current behaviors to the accomplishment of future goals, their possible selves serve a self-regulatory role. Students with a self-regulatory focus are better able to make changes in behavior which can lead to goal achievement.

  47. It is important for students to become self-regulated learnerswho can set learning goals create action plans then monitor their progress towards their goals by assessing their efforts and making adaptations as necessary