closing the expectation gap n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Closing the Expectation Gap PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Closing the Expectation Gap

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 27

Closing the Expectation Gap - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 112 Views
  • Uploaded on

Closing the Expectation Gap. Fourth Annual 50-State Progress Report on the Alignment of High School Policies with the Demands of College and Careers. Align High School Graduation Requirements with College- and Career- Ready Expectations. II. The expectations gap.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Closing the Expectation Gap' - malinda-drakos


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
closing the expectation gap

Closing theExpectation Gap

Fourth Annual 50-State Progress Report on the Alignment of High School Policies with the Demands of College and Careers

slide2

Align High School Graduation Requirements with College- and Career- Ready Expectations

II.

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

the expectations gap
The expectations gap
  • In today’s economy, all students need a challenging academic course of study to succeed in postsecondary education and to get a good job.
  • But in many states, students can graduate from high school without having what it takes to continue learning or to earn a living wage.

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

3

closing the expectations gap
Closing the expectations gap
  • To close this expectations gap, Achieve created the American Diploma Project Network.
  • The Network includes 34 states that together educate nearly 85 percent of the nation’s public school students.
  • Network states have committed to four policy actions to better prepare students for college, the workplace and citizenship.

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

4

american diploma project network agenda
American Diploma Project Network agenda
  • Align high school standards with the demands of college and careers.
  • Require students to take a college- and career-ready curriculum to earn a high school diploma.
  • Build college-and career-ready measures into statewide high school assessment systems.
  • Develop reporting and accountability systems that promote college and career readiness.

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

5

requiring a rigorous curriculum is key to better preparing students for college and careers
Requiring a rigorous curriculum is key to better preparing students for college and careers
  • Course-taking matters more for student achievement than social problems, family obstacles and student ability.
  • Nearly every state requires students to study specific subjects for a certain number of years or take specific courses to graduate, but most do not require a college- and career-ready curriculum.
  • Research by the American Diploma Project and others shows that students who go to college and students who go to work need the same knowledge and skills, particularly in English and math.

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

6

adp identifying knowledge and skills students need to succeed in college and the workplace
ADP: Identifying knowledge and skills students need to succeed in college and the workplace
  • Achieve, The Education Trust, and the Thomas B. Fordham Foundation launched the American Diploma Project (ADP) to identify knowledge and skills students need in English and math to succeed in college or get a “good” job.
  • Partnered with Indiana, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Nevada and Texas.
  • Involved wide variety of K–12, higher education and business representatives.

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

7

how american diploma project defines good jobs
How American Diploma Project defines “good” jobs
  • Pays enough to support a family well above the poverty level,
  • Provides benefits, and
  • Offers clear pathways for career advancement through further education and training.

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

8

what does it take to succeed in good jobs
What does it take to succeed in good jobs?
  • American Diploma Project research found that:
  • 84 percent of highly paid professionals took Algebra II or higher in high school.
  • Employees in vast majority of good jobs took four years of grade-level English.
  • Employers emphasize importance of workers being able to think creatively and logically and to identify and solve problems.
  • Fastest-growing occupations require some education beyond high school (e.g., certificate, bachelor’s degree, associate degree, on-the-job training).

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

9

to be college and career ready students need to complete a rigorous sequence of courses
To be college- and career-ready, students need to complete a rigorous sequence of courses
  • In math:
    • Four courses
    • Content equivalent to Algebra I and II, Geometry, and a fourth course such as Statistics or Precalculus

To cover the content American Diploma Project research shows students need to be college- and career-ready, high school graduates need to take:

In English:

  • Four courses
  • Content equivalent to four years of grade-level English or higher (i.e., honors or AP English)

Cross-disciplinary proficiencies are critical elements of the math and English benchmarks

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

10

cross disciplinary proficiencies
Cross-Disciplinary Proficiencies
  • To achieve success in college, the workplace and life, American students must not only master important content, they must also be adept problem solvers and critical thinkers who can contribute and apply their knowledge and skills in novel contexts and unforeseen situations. Specifically, the ADP benchmarks include the following cross-disciplinary proficiencies:
    • Research and Evidence Gathering.
    • Critical Thinking and Decision Making
    • Communications and Teamwork
    • Media and Technology
  • Students need a strong content foundation in order to master these sophisticated cross-disciplinary proficiencies. Cross-disciplinary proficiencies are, therefore, best taught in the context of rigorous courses in the foundational disciplines.

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

11

slide12
Taking rigorous high school courses greatly increases students’ readiness for college-level coursework

Percentage of students who meet ACT benchmark for college algebra by math courses taken in high school

Source: ACT, Crisis at the Core: Preparing All Students for College and Work, 2004.

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

12

students who had a rigorous high school curriculum are more likely to earn a bachelor s degree
Students who had a rigorous high school curriculum are more likely to earn a bachelor’s degree

Source: Adapted from Horn, L. and Kojaku, L.K. High School Academic Curriculum and the Persistence

Path through College: Persistence and Transfer Behavior of Undergraduates Three Years after Entering

Four-year Institutions, National Center for Education Statistics, 2001.

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

13

slide14
Taking challenging courses in high school closes college completion gap between whites and minorities

13%

30%

Source: Adelman, C. Answers in the Tool Box: Academic Intensity, Attendance Patterns, and Bachelor’s

Degree Attainment, U.S. Department of Education, Office of Educational Research and Improvement, 1999.

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

14

minority interest in advanced math far exceeds availability
Minority interest in advanced math far exceeds availability

Percentage of students

Source:National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, Progress Toward Power: A Follow-Up Survey of Children’s and Parents’ Attitudes About Math and Science. Research Letter, October 2001. Survey conducted by Harris Interactive, 1999.

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

15

graduates say they would have worked harder if high schools had challenged them
Graduates say they would have worked harder if high schools had challenged them

If your high school had demanded more of students, set higher academic standards and raised the expectations of how much coursework would be necessary to earn a diploma, would you have worked harder?

  • Wouldn’t have worked harder
  • Would have worked harder

80%

82%

  • Strongly feel I would

have worked harder

High school graduates who did not go to college

High school graduates who went to college

Source: Peter D. Hart Research Associates/Public Opinion Strategies, Rising to the Challenge: Are High School Graduates Prepared for College and Work? prepared for Achieve, Inc., 2005.

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

16

current students agree
Current students agree

Percentage of students who say they would work harder if high school

offered more demanding and interesting courses

Source: National Governors Association, summary of RateYourFuture.org survey findings, 2005.

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

17

graduates who faced high expectations in high school twice as likely to feel prepared for future
Graduates who faced high expectations in high school twice as likely to feel prepared for future

Percentage saying they were extremely/very well prepared

Source: Peter D. Hart Research Associates/Public Opinion Strategies, Rising to the Challenge: Are High School Graduates Prepared for College and Work? prepared for Achieve, Inc., 2005.

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

18

taking advanced math in high school better prepares students for math on the job
Taking advanced math in high school better prepares students for math on the job

Percentage of high school graduates extremely or very well prepared for expectations of college/work

Source: Peter D. Hart Research Associates/Public Opinion Strategies, Rising to the Challenge: Are High School Graduates Prepared for College and Work? prepared for Achieve, Inc., 2005.

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

19

students who did more writing in high school feel better prepared to write on the job
Students who did more writing in high school feel better prepared to write on the job

Percentage of high school graduates extremely or very well prepared for expectations of college/work

Source: Peter D. Hart Research Associates/Public Opinion Strategies, Rising to the Challenge: Are High School Graduates Prepared for College and Work? prepared for Achieve, Inc., 2005.

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

20

twenty states require a college and career ready diploma for all
Twenty states require a college- and career-ready diploma for all

ME

VT

WA

ND

NH

MT

MN

MA

NY

OR

WI

RI

ID

SD

MI

CT

WY

PA

NJ

IA

OH

DE

NE

IN

NV

IL

MD

WV

VA

UT

DC

KY

CO

KS

MO

CA

NC

TN

SC

OK

AR

AZ

NM

GA

AL

MS

TX

LA

FL

AK

Mandatory college- and

career-ready diploma

Default college- and

career-ready diploma

HI

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

21

eight others plan to
…eight others plan to

ME

VT

WA

ND

NH

MT

MN

MA

NY

OR

WI

RI

ID

SD

MI

CT

WY

PA

NJ

IA

OH

DE

NE

IN

NV

IL

MD

WV

VA

UT

DC

KY

CO

KS

MO

CA

NC

TN

SC

OK

AR

AZ

NM

GA

AL

MS

TX

LA

FL

AK

Planning to raise requirements

HI

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

22

how states are doing it default curricula opt out provision
How states are doing it: Default curricula (opt out provision)

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

23

how states are doing it mandatory curriculum no opt out provision
How states are doing it: Mandatory curriculum (no opt out provision)

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

24

what it will take to raise graduation requirements
What it will take to raise graduation requirements
  • States that let local districts set their own requirements will need to consider other approaches.
  • States need to pay more attention to the content of the courses that are taught rather than simply measure course titles and Carnegie units.
  • States need to allow teachers to engage students in different ways that match their learning styles.
  • States need to ensure that there are enough teachers who are prepared to teach higher-level courses.

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

25

what can we expect
What can we expect?
  • Implementation takes time and effort. States must:
    • Monitor efforts.
    • Communicate effectively.
    • Invest resources wisely.
    • Use data to protect investment.
    • Build in the necessary supports and incentives for teachers and students to ensure all schools can provide the rigorous curriculum to all students.

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

26

these efforts matter
These efforts matter
  • All students need and deserve to be prepared for success in both postsecondary education and the labor market.
  • This is not easy work … but this is possible … and this effort is essential.

Achieve |2009 CLOSING THE EXPECTATIONS GAP

27