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14th Flying Training Wing
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  1. 14th Flying Training Wing Building the World’s Best Pilots, Leaders, and Warriors Noncommissioned Officer Professional Enhancement I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e

  2. NCO Professional Enhancement WELCOME

  3. Agenda (Day 1) • 0730 – 0745 Introduction/Admin • 0745 – 0800 Welcome • 0800 – 0900 Enlisted Force Structure • 0910 – 1010 Enlisted Heritage • 1020 – 1120 Ethics and Core Values • 1120 – 1300 Lunch • 1300 – 1400 Senior Leadership Panel (First Sergeants) • 1410 – 1510 NCO Roadmap to Success • 1530 – 1630 PT

  4. NCO Professional Development Building the World’s Best Pilots, Leaders, and Warriors Enlisted Force Structure I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e

  5. NCOProfessional Enhancement Enlisted Force Structure I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e

  6. Enlisted Force Structure The Philosophy: - Provide for a stable career structure - Provide opportunity for personal growth - Manage training, education, promotions - Reflect the Core Values Reorganized into 3-tier system in 1977 to facilitate professional growth throughout the enlisted ranks

  7. Enlisted Force Structure The Purpose: - Best meets mission requirements - Provide common, stable career structure - Provides all Airmen opportunity for professional growth

  8. Enlisted Force Structure

  9. Leadership Levels • Professional development and responsibilities are described in AFI 36-2618, Enlisted Force Development Doctrine • It is grounded in basic leadership doctrine at three levels: • Tactical • Operational • Strategic

  10. Leadership Levels • TACTICAL– (E1–E6) learn/perfect primary skills • Honing follower-ship abilities, influencing peers and motivating subordinates • Learn about themselves as leaders • NOTE: To be a good leader, you MUST first learn to be a good FOLLOWER • Gaining general understanding of team leadership • Being assimilated into Air Force culture and adopting core values

  11. Leadership Levels • OPERATIONAL – (E7–E9) increases focus on how one team/section relates to others (big picture) • Continue to develop personal leadership skills and broadening experience • Develop familiarity in institutional leadership competencies • Increased responsibilities and positions of authority (division/branch chiefs) • This is where war fighting is executed and day-to-day command and control of Air Force operations are carried out

  12. Leadership Levels • STRATEGIC – most senior enlisted leaders assigned at these levels (key leadership positions) • Leaders need tactical comprehension and competence • Ability to lead Airmen and joint forces in an expeditionary environment • Should embody Air Force cultural and core values • Positions include MAJCOM and Air Staff level jobs • Advising top leaders • Managing career fields • Leading far-reaching programs and processes

  13. Leadership Definition • LEADERSHIP – The art of influencing and directing people to accomplish a mission • Two key points; people and the mission • Leadership requires decision making (Dwight D. Eisenhower stated Decision making is the essence of leadership) • Leaders are involved, hold people accountable, and set the example

  14. Leadership Advice • Be tough • Get out from behind your desk • Search out problems • Find critical path to success • Be sensitive • Do not take things for granted • Don’t alibi • Don’t procrastinate • Don’t tolerate incompetence • Be honest

  15. Enlisted Force Structure NCO Responsibilities • AFI 36-2618, 1 December 2004 • 4.1.1 Accept and execute all duties, instructions, responsibilities and lawful orders in a timely manner. Lead subordinates and exercise effective followership in mission accomplishment. Place official duties and responsibilities ahead of personal desires. • 4.1.2 …Be technically, physically, mentally and spiritually ready to accomplish the mission. Actively support AF zero tolerance policy on discrimination and sexual harassment. Be alert for people exhibiting suicidal behavior and immediately report it. Be postured to deploy.

  16. NCO Rank and Authority AFI 36-2618 para 4.1.3 (NOTE): NCOs give orders in the exercise of their duties. A willful failure to obey these orders is a violation of the Uniform Code of Military Justice, Article 91. Also, other failures... may be offenses under UCMJ, Article 92. NCOS have apprehension authority as permitted under UCMJ, Article 7.

  17. General NCO Responsibilities NCOs MUST: • Consider professional development of their subordinates • Attain and maintain skill level commensurate with their rank • Secure and promote PME for themselves and subordinates • Develop and maintain thorough understanding of supervisory techniques

  18. General NCO Responsibilities • Possess a thorough understanding of Air Force standards, customs, and courtesies • Observe, counsel, and correct individuals regarding on- and off-duty performance, professional relationships, and personal appearance • Appropriately recognize and reward • Implement approved policies, directives, and programs

  19. Specific NCO Responsibilities • Staff Sergeants: • Primary highly skilled technicians with supervisory and training responsibilities. • Continuously strive to further develop as technicians, and further build supervisory competence. • Should be given every opportunity to demonstrate leadership as they develop as leaders. • Responsible for their subordinates and the effective accomplishment of all tasks. • Ensure proper and effective use of all personnel and material under their control. Operates at the tactical level within a unit.

  20. Specific NCO Responsibilities • Technical Sergeants: • Organizations’ technical experts within their specialty - Provides sound training and supervision - Responsible for development of all enlisted personnel - Obtain maximum performance from each subordinate and ensure the mission is efficiently and effectively accomplished - Must continuously strive to broaden and perfect their technical expertise and supervisory techniques. - Operates at the tactical level within a unit.

  21. Mission Impact • Enlisted Force Structure establishes the foundation from which the mission gets done • Enlisted Force Structure establishes structure and responsibilities • Bottom Line: If we don’t fulfill our roles, the mission suffers… and that weakens the defense of the United States

  22. Enlisted Force Structure • Summary: • - Three tier system – it’s no accident • First you learn the job • Then you teach others to do the job (Mentoring!!) • Finally you lead others in accomplishing the job • - Take your responsibilities to heart • - The Major Difference between Managers and Leaders: • Managers do things right…Leaders do the right thing - The Air Force needs you to be both

  23. Scenario #1 You are a supervisor for two NCOs. Both do their job equally well. One NCO is involved in Professional Organizations, on-base and off-base activities, intra-mural sports, and the squadron booster club. The other NCO is only involved in off- duty education. Both receive PCS orders and your superintendent expects decoration nominations on both NCOs. You don’t feel the latter NCO (off-duty education) meets the intent of the decoration program. How would you handle it?

  24. Enlisted Force Structure Question Time… THANK YOU FOR YOUR COMMITMENT TO BEING THE BEST NCO YOU CAN BE.

  25. Air Education and Training Command Building the World’s Best Pilots, Leaders, and Warriors Air ForceEnlisted Heritage I n t e g r i t y - S e r v i c e - E x c e l l e n c e

  26. OVERVIEW • Some Enlisted Trivia • Campanale’s Challenge • Enlisted Heritage • Air Force Cohesion Problem • Air Force Enlisted Culture • Enlisted Heritage • Other Aspects of Enlisted Culture • Transmitting AF Enlisted Heritage & Culture (Group Exercise) • Conclusions

  27. ENLISTED TRIVIA - 1 Congress and the President established the E-8 and E-9 “supergrades” in … a. 1947, as part of the National Security Act creating the USAF b. 1958, in response to a steep drop in retention among armed services c. 1969, to promote recruitment during the Vietnam War

  28. ENLISTED TRIVIA - 1 Congress and the President established the E-8 and E-9 “supergrades” in … a. 1947, as part of the National Security Act creating the USAF b. 1958, in response to a steep drop in retention among the armed services c. 1969, to promote recruitment during the Vietnam War

  29. ENLISTED TRIVIA - 1 Low pay and severe promotion stagnation at E-7 led to poor retention rates, at a time when the Soviet Union’s launch of Sputnik underscored the need to retain personnel skilled in the operation and maintenance of increasingly sophisticated weapons systems. In response President Eisenhower signed Public Law 85-422, establishing the two supergrades plus a new and more generous compensation system. For the Air Force, the supergrades also provided a way to phase out its warrant officer program. The Air Force initially selected 2,000 E-7s for promotion to E-8 without regard to AFSC. Of these, 85 percent later were promoted to chief.

  30. ENLISTED TRIVIA - 2 The Air Force claims 4 Medal of Honor recipients from World War I, 38 from World War II, 4 from the Korean War, and 13 from the Vietnam War. Of these, four from WW II and two from Vietnam were enlisted Airmen. Decorated posthumously in December 2000, Bill Pitsenbarger was the 59th Air Force recipient of the Medal of Honor.

  31. ENLISTED TRIVIA - 3 Which CSAF began his military career as an enlisted man? a. Tony McPeak b. Carl Spaatz c. Larry Welch

  32. ENLISTED TRIVIA - 3 Which CSAF began his military career as an enlisted man? a. Tony McPeak b. Carl Spaatz c. Larry Welch

  33. ENLISTED TRIVIA - 3 Gen Larry Welch enlisted in the Air Force during the Korean War and later received his pilot wings and commission through the aviation cadet program. Follow-up question – Which CSAF was a Goodfellow graduate?

  34. ENLISTED TRIVIA - 3 Gen Larry Welch enlisted in the Air Force during the Korean War and later received his pilot wings and commission through the aviation cadet program. Follow-up question – Which CSAF was a Goodfellow graduate? Gen Charles Gabriel

  35. ENLISTED TRIVIA - 4 Who among the following was not prior enlisted? Billy Mitchell (Father strategic bombing) Jimmy Doolittle (Doolittle Raid) Eddie Rickenbacker (Top ace WWI) Nathan Twining (First Airman to Chair JCS) Stuart Symington (First SECAF) Dick Bong (Top ace WWII) Chuck Yeagar (First supersonic flight)

  36. ENLISTED TRIVIA - 4 Who among the following was not prior enlisted? Billy Mitchell (Father strategic bombing) Jimmy Doolittle (Doolittle Raid) Eddie Rickenbacker (Top ace WWI) Nathan Twining (First Airman to Chair JCS) Stuart Symington (First SECAF) Dick Bong (Top ace WWII) Chuck Yeagar (First supersonic flight) ALL WERE PRIOR ENLISTED

  37. ENLISTED TRIVIA - 5 In what year did the Air Force become the first US military service to provide the same basic uniform for both officers and enlisted personnel? a. 1950 b. 1962 c. 1973

  38. ENLISTED TRIVIA - 5 In what year did the Air Force become the first US military service to provide the same basic uniform for both officers and enlisted personnel? a. 1950 b. 1962 c. 1973

  39. ENLISTED TRIVIA - 5 According to the deputy chief of staff of the new Air Force in 1947, “one of the morale problems” facing the armed forces was that “officers were permitted to wear a uniform so entirely different from that of enlisted men that a severe class line was drawn.” Thus, the new Air Force elected to develop a uniform that was both distinctive and truly uniform. Implementation of the new uniform was delayed until 1950 because the Quartermaster had purchased a large stock of olive drab material before the new uniform decision was made. By September 1950, however, all personnel had at least one full set of the new uniform. At right, an Airman wearing a new blue Ike jacket in 1952.

  40. CAMPANALE’S CHALLENGE Why, in this high-tech information age, is the heritage of Air Force enlisted people not a major part of the visibly chronicled history of the US military? CMSAF Dave Campanale, 1996

  41. CAMPANALE’S CHALLENGE Why, in this high-tech information age, is the heritage of Air Force enlisted people not a major part of the visibly chronicled history of the US military? • AF is 80% enlisted, but focus has been on other 20% • Few photographs of enlisted from early years • Few enlisted memorializations CMSAF Dave Campanale, 1996

  42. CAMPANALE’S CHALLENGE Why, in this high-tech information age, is the heritage of Air Force enlisted people not a major part of the visibly chronicled history of the US military? • Challenge: “Make everyone aware of the achievements of both enlisted and officers, as a reference point to say this is where we’ve come from.” CMSAF Dave Campanale, 1996

  43. COHESION • “The US Air Force has a cohesion problem.” -- Former SECAF Don Rice, complaining that Airmen identified more with weapon systems than with AF

  44. COHESION • “The US Air Force has a cohesion problem.” -- Former SECAF Don Rice, complaining that Airmen identified more with weapon systems than with AF • “Loyalty within the Air Force has devolved from the larger service to individual functions, technologies, and occupations.” -- Carl Builder, author

  45. COHESION • The US Air Force has a cohesion problem. -- Former SECAF Don Rice, complaining that Airmen identified more with weapon systems than with AF • Loyalty within the Air Force has devolved from the larger service to individual functions, technologies, and occupations. -- Carl Builder, author • “Our service has a cohesion problem, and it is firmly rooted in the culture, technical specialties, and organizational dynamics within the diverse, complex entity that is today’s Air Force.” -- James Smith, retired AF officer

  46. ENLISTED CULTURE “Every organization has a culture, that is, a persistent, patterned way of thinking about central tasks of and human relationships within an organization. Culture is to an organization what personality is to an individual. Like human culture generally, it is passed on from one generation to the next. It changes slowly if at all.” --James Wilson, Bureaucracy (1991)

  47. ENLISTED CULTURE “Every organization has a culture, that is, a persistent, patterned way of thinking about central tasks of and human relationships within an organization. Culture is to an organization what personality is to an individual. Like human culture generally, it is passed on from one generation to the next. It changes slowly if at all.” --James Wilson, Bureaucracy (1991) Enlisted culture encompasses those things you find as your identity as members of the Air Force.

  48. ENLISTED HERITAGE • VALOR – TSgt Forrest Vosler

  49. ENLISTED HERITAGE • VALOR – MSgt Henry “Red” Erwin No one expected Erwin to survive, so the Medal of Honor was approved within hours and presented to him at the hospital in Guam.

  50. ENLISTED HERITAGE In fact, Sergeant Erwin survived the ordeal. Released from the hospital in 1947 following reconstructive surgery, he died in 2002 at the age of 80. Starring Forrest Tucker, The Wild Blue Yonder (1951) included Erwin’s story as part of the film. Since 1997, the Air Force has presented the Henry E. Erwin Enlisted Aircrew Member of the Year Award.