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KC-135: Particle Damping. Bill Tandy Tim Allison Rob Ross John Hatlelid. Introduction. Team Overview Project Description Theory Design Budget Schedule. The Team-Bill Tandy. Internship Experiences Lead to the Concept Became the ‘de Facto’ Leader

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kc 135 particle damping

KC-135: Particle Damping

Bill Tandy

Tim Allison

Rob Ross

John Hatlelid

introduction
Introduction
  • Team Overview
  • Project Description
  • Theory
  • Design
  • Budget
  • Schedule
the team bill tandy
The Team-Bill Tandy
  • Internship Experiences Lead to the Concept
  • Became the ‘de Facto’ Leader
  • Overall Responsibility for the Project
    • Point Man for NASA
    • Attends Department Meetings & Events
the team tim allison
The Team-Tim Allison
  • Hard Working and Diligent
  • Responsible for Funding
  • Arranged Hotel and Travel
  • Theoretical Background
the team rob ross
The Team-Rob Ross
  • Aptitude for Design and Construction
  • Given Responsibility for Construction
    • Cabinet Design and Construction
    • Experiment Materials and Setup
  • Volunteered to Write Weekly Memos
the team john hatlelid
The Team-John Hatlelid
  • Dedicated and Thorough
  • Determined Components of the Experiment
  • Responsibility for Applying for Donations
  • Worked with Rob on Construction
kc 135 program
KC-135 Program
  • Annual opportunity for undergraduate student research
  • KC-135 Aircraft flies parabolic trajectory to create microgravity environment
  • Microgravity environment available for 20-30 seconds
goals for this semester
Goals for this Semester
  • Understand the underlying concepts of vibrating cantilever beams
  • Devise an experiment to test the impact of particle damping
  • Gather data on the ground
  • Gather data in flight
  • Compare the two sets of data
project background
Project Background
  • Ball Aerospace Needed Unique Solutions to Damping Vibrations in Space Structures
  • Particle Damping was Investigated, but Discarded Due to Lack of Data
  • NASA’s Student Flight Program Provided the Perfect Platform for Data Acquisition
experiment basics
Experiment Basics
  • Vibrating Cantilever Beam Filled with Particles of Different Material Properties
particle variations
Particle Variations
  • Twelve Pre-Filled Beams
  • Three Materials of Different Density
  • Each Material Will Have Two Sizes
  • Each Size Will Fill the Beam 50% & 75%
data reduction
Data Reduction
  • Accelerometer will acquire acceleration at the tip of beam
  • Peak acceleration amplitude will be plotted vs. time
  • We will compare the duration & amplitude of transient, steady-state, and decay period vibrations for each sample
theory overview
Theory Overview
  • Viscoelastic Damping
  • Frictional Damping
  • Beam Response
  • Problems
theory viscoelastic damping
Theory – Viscoelastic Damping
  • Particles collide with other particles and with the cavity wall
  • Energy only conserved for perfectly elastic collisions, where particles are undeformed
  • Particles may be represented with Maxwell model:
  • Dashpot in Maxwell model represents viscoelastic damping within material

Source: University of Texas

theory frictional damping
Theory – Frictional Damping
  • Friction forces act on particles as they scrape against each other and cavity walls, converting kinetic energy to thermal energy:
  • Particle-Particle:
  • Particle-Cavity:
  • Particle-Cavity Equations are only useful in a gravitational field

Source: Olson & Drake, University of Dayton

theory beam response
Theory – Beam Response
  • System is a cantilever beam with sinusoidal base excitation:
  • Differential EOM is:
  • Solution is an infinite sum:

y(t)=Y0sin(t)

u(x,t)

Algebraic Eigensolutions

Solutions to Modal ODEs

theory problems
Theory - Problems
  • Theoretical solution possible for hollow rod, but with added particles the problem becomes extremely complex
  • A theoretical prediction of the beam’s motion will not be attempted
  • The effect of particles will be analyzed experimentally on the KC-135
test bay design
Test Bay Design
  • Some factors influencing the design
    • Requirements
    • Size
    • Procedures
    • Materials
test bay design1
Test Bay Design
  • Some factors influencing the design
    • Requirements
    • Size
    • Procedures
    • Materials
test bay design2
Test Bay Design
  • Some factors influencing the design
    • Requirements
    • Size
    • Procedures
    • Materials
test bay design3
Test Bay Design
  • Some factors influencing the design
    • Requirements
    • Size
    • Procedures
    • Materials
test bay design4
Test Bay Design
  • Some factors influencing the design
    • Requirements
    • Size
    • Procedures
    • Materials
test bay design5
Test Bay Design
  • Some factors influencing the design
    • Requirements
    • Size
    • Procedures
    • Materials
test bay design requirements
Test Bay Design: Requirements
  • Structurally sound (withstand 9 G’s)
  • Secure to Aircraft
  • Test equipment security
  • Test equipment containment
  • Weight per spacer
  • Non-hazardous
test bay design requirements1
Test Bay Design: Requirements
  • Structurally sound (withstand 9 G’s)
  • Secure to Aircraft
  • Test equipment security
  • Test equipment containment
  • Weight per spacer
  • Non-hazardous
test bay design requirements2
Test Bay Design: Requirements
  • Structurally sound (withstand 9 G’s)
  • Secure to Aircraft
  • Test equipment security
  • Test equipment containment
  • Weight per spacer
  • Non-hazardous
test bay design requirements3
Test Bay Design: Requirements
  • Structurally sound (withstand 9 G’s)
  • Secure to Aircraft
  • Test equipment security
  • Test equipment containment
  • Weight per spacer
  • Non-hazardous
test bay design requirements4
Test Bay Design: Requirements
  • Structurally sound (withstand 9 G’s)
  • Secure to Aircraft
  • Test equipment security
  • Test equipment containment
  • Weight per spacer
  • Non-hazardous
test bay design requirements5
Test Bay Design: Requirements
  • Structurally sound (withstand 9 G’s)
  • Secure to Aircraft
  • Test equipment security
  • Test equipment containment
  • Weight per spacer
  • Non-hazardous
test bay design requirements6
Test Bay Design: Requirements
  • Structurally sound (withstand 9 G’s)
  • Secure to Aircraft
  • Test equipment security
  • Test equipment containment
  • Weight per spacer
  • Non-hazardous
test bay design size
Test Bay Design: Size
  • Layout
  • Spacing
  • Weight
  • Timing
test bay design size1
Test Bay Design: Size
  • Layout
  • Spacing
  • Weight
  • Timing
test bay design size2
Test Bay Design: Size
  • Layout
  • Spacing
  • Weight
  • Timing
test bay design size3
Test Bay Design: Size
  • Layout
  • Spacing
  • Weight
  • Timing
test bay design size4
Test Bay Design: Size
  • Layout
  • Spacing
  • Weight
  • Timing
test bay design size layout
Test Bay Design: Size / Layout
  • KC-135 cross-section
  • KC-135 floor spacers
test bay design size layout1
Test Bay Design: Size / Layout
  • KC-135 cross-section
  • KC-135 floor spacers
test bay design size layout2
Test Bay Design: Size / Layout
  • KC-135 cross-section
  • KC-135 floorspacers
test bay design size spacing
Test Bay Design: Size / Spacing
  • Ample room for test operation
  • Specimens laid end to end
  • Function generator, Line conditioner, Surge protector
  • Computer, Work space
test bay design size spacing1
Test Bay Design: Size / Spacing
  • Ample room for test operation
  • Specimens laid end to end
  • Function generator, Line conditioner, Surge protector
  • Computer, Work space
test bay design size spacing2
Test Bay Design: Size / Spacing
  • Ample room for test operation
  • Specimens laid end to end
  • Function generator, Line conditioner, Surge protector
  • Computer, Work space
test bay design size spacing3
Test Bay Design: Size / Spacing
  • Ample room for test operation
  • Specimens laid end to end
  • Function generator, Line conditioner, Surge protector
  • Computer, Work space
test bay design size spacing4
Test Bay Design: Size / Spacing
  • Ample room for test operation
  • Specimens laid end to end
  • Function generator, Line conditioner, Surge protector
  • Computer, Work space
test bay design size weight
Test Bay Design: Size / Weight
  • 200 lbs per spacer used
  • 6 spacers required
  • 300 lbs max weight
  • Our weight approximately 280 lbs
test bay design size weight1
Test Bay Design: Size / Weight
  • 200 lbs per spacer used
  • 6 spacers required
  • 300 lbs max weight
  • Our weight approximately 280 lbs
test bay design size weight2
Test Bay Design: Size / Weight
  • 200 lbs per spacer used
  • 6 spacers required
  • 300 lbs max weight
  • Our weight approximately 280 lbs
test bay design size weight3
Test Bay Design: Size / Weight
  • 200 lbs per spacer used
  • 6 spacers required
  • 300 lbs max weight
  • Our weight approximately 280 lbs
test bay design size weight4
Test Bay Design: Size / Weight
  • 200 lbs per spacer used
  • 6 spacers required
  • 300 lbs max weight
  • Our weight approximately 280 lbs
test bay design size timing
Test Bay Design: Size / Timing
  • 30 second zero G maneuver
  • 40 seconds for test specimen swap and test setup
  • Requires that test areas be uncluttered
test bay design size timing1
Test Bay Design: Size / Timing
  • 30 second zero G maneuver
  • 40 seconds for test specimen swap and test setup
  • Requires that test areas be uncluttered
test bay design size timing2
Test Bay Design: Size / Timing
  • 30 second zero G maneuver
  • 40 seconds for test specimen swap and test setup
  • Requires that test areas be uncluttered
test bay design size timing3
Test Bay Design: Size / Timing
  • 30 second zero G maneuver
  • 40 seconds for test specimen swap and test setup
  • Requires that test areas be uncluttered
test bay design procedures
Test Bay Design: Procedures
  • Prior to parabola, move into position in front of experimental assembly
  • Unlatch plexiglass door
  • Remove safety pins from specimens
  • Remove point mass from specimen
  • Remove specimen from base mass
  • Unlatch Upper Bay doors
  • Select next specimen from storage bay
  • Note new specimen selected
  • Replace previous specimen in storage bay
  • Close and latch upper bay doors
  • Insert new specimen into base mass
  • Attach point mass
  • Insert safety pins
  • Close and latch Plexiglas bay door
  • Configure LabView for next parabola
test bay design procedures latch
Test Bay Design: Procedures / Latch
  • Prior to parabola, move into position in front of experimental assembly
  • Unlatch plexiglass door
  • Remove safety pins from specimens
  • Remove point mass from specimen
  • Remove specimen from base mass
  • Unlatch Upper Bay doors
  • Select next specimen from storage bay
  • Note new specimen selected
  • Replace previous specimen in storage bay
  • Close and latch upper bay doors
  • Insert new specimen into base mass
  • Attach point mass
  • Insert safety pins
  • Close and latch Plexiglas bay door
  • Configure LabView for next parabola
test bay design procedures latch1
Test Bay Design: Procedures / Latch
  • Prior to parabola, move into position in front of experimental assembly
  • Unlatch plexiglass door
  • Remove safety pins from specimens
  • Remove point mass from specimen
  • Remove specimen from base mass
  • Unlatch upper bay doors
  • Select next specimen from storage bay
  • Note new specimen selected
  • Replace previous specimen in storage bay
  • Close and latch upper bay doors
  • Insert new specimen into base mass
  • Attach point mass
  • Insert safety pins
  • Close and latch Plexiglas bay door
  • Configure LabView for next parabola
test bay design procedures latch2
Test Bay Design: Procedures / Latch
  • Prior to parabola, move into position in front of experimental assembly
  • Unlatch plexiglass door
  • Remove safety pins from specimens
  • Remove point mass from specimen
  • Remove specimen from base mass
  • Unlatch Upper doors
  • Select next specimen from storage bay
  • Note new specimen selected
  • Replace previous specimen in storage bay
  • Close and latch upper bay doors
  • Insert new specimen into base mass
  • Attach point mass
  • Insert safety pins
  • Close and latch Plexiglas bay door
  • Configure LabView for next parabola
test bay design procedures latch3
Test Bay Design: Procedures / Latch
  • Prior to parabola, move into position in front of experimental assembly
  • Unlatch plexiglass door
  • Remove safety pins from specimens
  • Remove point mass from specimen
  • Remove specimen from base mass
  • Unlatch Upper Bay doors
  • Select next specimen from storage bay
  • Note new specimen selected
  • Replace previous specimen in storage bay
  • Close and latch upper doors
  • Insert new specimen into base mass
  • Attach point mass
  • Insert safety pins
  • Close and latch Plexiglas bay door
  • Configure LabView for next parabola
test bay design procedures latch4
Test Bay Design: Procedures / Latch
  • Prior to parabola, move into position in front of experimental assembly
  • Unlatch plexiglass door
  • Remove safety pins from specimens
  • Remove point mass from specimen
  • Remove specimen from base mass
  • Unlatch Upper Bay doors
  • Select next specimen from storage bay
  • Note new specimen selected
  • Replace previous specimen in storage bay
  • Close and latch upper bay doors
  • Insert new specimen into base mass
  • Attach point mass
  • Insert safety pins
  • Close and latch Plexiglas door
  • Configure LabView for next parabola
test bay design materials
Test Bay Design: Materials
  • Cost & Availability to strength ratios
  • Base - MDF
  • Frame - Steel
  • Walls and Shelves – 7 ply
test bay design materials1
Test Bay Design: Materials
  • Cost & Availability to strength ratios
  • Base - MDF
  • Frame - Steel
  • Walls and Shelves – 7 ply
test bay design materials2
Test Bay Design: Materials
  • Cost & Availability to strength ratios
  • Base - MDF
  • Frame - Steel
  • Walls and Shelves – 7 ply
test bay design materials3
Test Bay Design: Materials
  • Cost & Availability to strength ratios
  • Base - MDF
  • Frame - Steel
  • Walls and Shelves – 7 ply
test bay design materials4
Test Bay Design: Materials
  • Cost & Availability to strength ratios
  • Base - MDF
  • Frame - Steel
  • Walls and Shelves – 7 ply
test bay design materials base
Test Bay Design: Materials / Base
  • 4 2X4 ft and half in. thick sheets of MDF
  • 4 Casters Rated for 150 lbs each
test bay design materials base1
Test Bay Design: Materials / Base
  • 4 2X4 ft and half in. thick sheets of MDF
  • 4 Casters Rated for 150 lbs each
test bay design materials base2
Test Bay Design: Materials / Base
  • 4 2X4 ft and half in. thick sheets of MDF
  • 4 Casters Rated for 150 lbs each
test bay design materials frame
Test Bay Design: Materials / Frame
  • Steel angle iron
  • Steel L-Clamps
  • Steel truss members
test bay design materials frame1
Test Bay Design: Materials / Frame
  • Steel angle iron
  • Steel L-Clamps
  • Steel truss members
test bay design materials frame2
Test Bay Design: Materials / Frame
  • Steel angle iron
  • Steel L-Clamps
  • Steel truss members
test bay design materials frame3
Test Bay Design: Materials / Frame
  • Steel angle iron
  • Steel L-Clamps
  • Steel truss members
hardware design
Hardware Design
  • A data acquisition system is needed to determine the response in the beam
  • The system will use two accelerometers
  • The data acquisition system must be lightweight and capable of interfacing with a laptop
hardware design1
Hardware Design
  • A data acquisition system is needed to determine the response in the beam
  • The system will use two accelerometers
  • The data acquisition system must be lightweight and capable of interfacing with a laptop
hardware design2
Hardware Design
  • A data acquisition system is needed to determine the response in the beam
  • The system will use two accelerometers
  • The data acquisition system must be lightweight and capable of interfacing with a laptop
hardware design3
Hardware Design
  • A data acquisition system is needed to determine the response in the beam
  • The system will use two accelerometers
  • The data acquisition system must be lightweight and capable of interfacing with a laptop
hardware selection
Hardware Selection
  • DAQ System
  • We consulted Travis Fergusson at National Instruments
  • Currently we are looking at using National Instruments hardware for data acquisition
hardware selection1
Hardware Selection
  • DAQ System
  • We consulted Travis Fergusson at National Instruments
  • Currently we are looking at using National Instruments hardware for data acquisition
hardware selection2
Hardware Selection
  • DAQ System
  • We consulted Travis Fergusson at National Instruments
  • Currently we are looking at using National Instruments hardware for data acquisition
daq system
DAQ System
  • NI - 6036 DAQ Card
  • Lightweight
  • Can be interfaced with a laptop
  • Supports SCC line conditioner
  • Has many inputs with high sampling rates

Image courtesy of National Instruments

daq system1
DAQ System
  • NI - 6036 DAQ Card
  • Lightweight
  • Can be interfaced with a laptop
  • Supports SCC line conditioner
  • Has many inputs with high sampling rates

Image courtesy of National Instruments

daq system2
DAQ System
  • NI - 6036 DAQ Card
  • Lightweight
  • Can be interfaced with a laptop
  • Supports SCC line conditioner
  • Has many inputs with high sampling rates

Image courtesy of National Instruments

daq system3
DAQ System
  • NI - 6036 DAQ Card
  • Lightweight
  • Can be interfaced with a laptop
  • Supports SCC line conditioner
  • Has many inputs with high sampling rates

Image courtesy of National Instruments

daq system4
DAQ System
  • NI - 6036 DAQ Card
  • Lightweight
  • Can be interfaced with a laptop
  • Supports SCC line conditioner
  • Has many inputs with high sampling rates

Image courtesy of National Instruments

daq system5
DAQ System
  • NI – SC-2345
  • Modular unit for SCC line conditioning
  • SCC line conditioning is low cost and portable
  • With low number of inputs, this is an ideal system

Image courtesy of National Instruments

daq system6
DAQ System
  • NI – SC-2345
  • Modular unit for SCC line conditioning
  • SCC line conditioning is low cost and portable
  • With low number of inputs, this is an ideal system

Image courtesy of National Instruments

daq system7
DAQ System
  • NI – SC-2345
  • Modular unit for SCC line conditioning
  • SCC line conditioning is low cost and portable
  • With low number of inputs, this is an ideal system

Image courtesy of National Instruments

daq system8
DAQ System
  • NI – SC-2345
  • Modular unit for SCC line conditioning
  • SCC line conditioning is low cost and portable
  • With low number of inputs, this is an ideal system

Image courtesy of National Instruments

daq system9
DAQ System
  • NI – SCC-ACC01
  • Accelerometer module
  • Designed to take inputs from accelerometers and send the signal to the DAQ card
  • Provides power for accelerometer

Image courtesy of National Instruments

daq system10
DAQ System
  • NI – SCC-ACC01
  • Accelerometer module
  • Designed to take inputs from accelerometers and send the signal to the DAQ card
  • Provides power for accelerometer

Image courtesy of National Instruments

daq system11
DAQ System
  • NI – SCC-ACC01
  • Accelerometer module
  • Designed to take inputs from accelerometers and send the signal to the DAQ card
  • Provides power for accelerometer

Image courtesy of National Instruments

accelerometers
Accelerometers
  • Interface with SCC DAQ system
  • Compact size and weight
  • High natural frequency
  • Able to measure low frequencies
accelerometers1
Accelerometers
  • Interface with SCC DAQ system
  • Compact size and weight
  • High natural frequency
  • Able to measure low frequencies
accelerometers2
Accelerometers
  • Interface with SCC DAQ system
  • Compact size and weight
  • High natural frequency
  • Able to measure low frequencies
accelerometers3
Accelerometers
  • Interface with SCC DAQ system
  • Compact size and weight
  • High natural frequency
  • Able to measure low frequencies
accelerometers4
Accelerometers
  • Honeywell – PA Accelerometer
  • 3-5000 Hz frequency range
  • 50 g range
  • Rugged
  • Natural frequency of 30 kHz

Image courtesy

of Honeywell

accelerometers5
Accelerometers
  • Honeywell – PA Accelerometer
  • 3-5000 Hz frequency range
  • 50 g range
  • Rugged
  • Natural frequency of 30 kHz

Image courtesy

of Honeywell

accelerometers6
Accelerometers
  • Honeywell – PA Accelerometer
  • 3-5000 Hz frequency range
  • 50 g range
  • Rugged
  • Natural frequency of 30 kHz

Image courtesy

of Honeywell

accelerometers7
Accelerometers
  • Honeywell – PA Accelerometer
  • 3-5000 Hz frequency range
  • 50 g range
  • Rugged
  • Natural frequency of 30 kHz

Image courtesy

of Honeywell

shaker
Shaker
  • Exact shaker is still to be determined
  • Needs to be lightweight
  • Shaker must provide an input of around 100 Hz

Image courtesy

of Labworks

shaker1
Shaker
  • Exact shaker is still to be determined
  • Needs to be lightweight
  • Shaker must provide an input of around 100 Hz

Image courtesy

of Labworks

shaker2
Shaker
  • Exact shaker is still to be determined
  • Needs to be lightweight
  • Shaker must provide an input of around 100 Hz

Image courtesy

of Labworks

shaker input device
Shaker Input Device
  • Shaker input must come from a power supply and function generator
  • Exact function generator and power supply cannot be determined until a shaker has been determined
  • Possible shaker source is from Dr. Stearman
shaker input device1
Shaker Input Device
  • Shaker input must come from a power supply and function generator
  • Exact function generator and power supply cannot be determined until a shaker has been determined
  • Possible shaker source is from Dr. Stearman
shaker input device2
Shaker Input Device
  • Shaker input must come from a power supply and function generator
  • Exact function generator and power supply cannot be determined until a shaker has been determined
  • Possible shaker source is from Dr. Stearman
funding and other aid
Funding and Other Aid
  • NASA gave time & space on the KC-135
  • UT ASE Department gave $3000 and use of Laptop and Digital Video Camera
  • Texas Space Grant Consortium gave $2000 for specific costs
  • Honeywell donated accelerometers
  • National Instruments donated LabView license, possibly other hardware
current financial status
Current Financial Status
  • Equipment so far has been less expensive than anticipated
  • The surplus funds leave us extra options in case of unexpected changes
  • The project will be completed within budget
summary
Summary
  • Team Overview
  • Project Description
  • Theory
  • Design
  • Budget
  • Schedule
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