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BULL TROUT Proposed Critical Habitat. Pacific Region U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service January 13, 2010. Photo by Bart Gamett. Photo by Wade Fredenberg. Bull Trout ESA History. 1999: Listed as threatened 2002/04: Draft recovery plan

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bull trout proposed critical habitat

BULL TROUTProposed Critical Habitat

Pacific Region

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service

January 13, 2010

bull trout esa history
Bull Trout ESA History

1999: Listed as threatened

2002/04: Draft recovery plan

2005: Critical habitat designated; challenged in U.S. District Court (Oregon)

2008: 5-year status review completed;bull trout remain listed rangewide

July, 2009: Court directs new proposed rule by Dec 09

January, 2010: Critical habitat re-proposed

critical habitat
Critical Habitat

Specific areas within the range of the species with physical and biological features essential to the conservation of the species that may require special management consideration.

four biological indicators
Four Biological Indicators

Distribution

Abundance

Trend

Connectivity

seven guiding principles
“Seven Guiding Principles”

Conserve diverse life-history

Conserve genetic diversity

Ensure species distribution across habitats

Ensure connectivity among populations

Ensure sufficient habitat for viable populations

Consider threats (e.g., climate change)

Ensure multiple, redundant populations

nine habitat needs primary constituent elements
Nine Habitat Needs (Primary Constituent Elements)

Springs, seeps, groundwater sources, subsurface water connectivity

Migratory corridors with minimal impediments

Abundant food base (insects, fish)

Complex stream channels

Cold water (2 to 15 °C)

Varied stream substrates (quantity, size, composition)

Natural stream flow patterns

Sufficient water quantity

Few or no nonnative species

proposed designation
Proposed Designation
  • Proposed Rule (2010)
    • Stream Miles: 22,679 miles (36,498 kilometers)
    • Lakes/Reservoirs: 533,426 acres (215,870 hectares)
  • • Idaho: 9,671 stream miles; 197,915 acres of lakes or reservoirs
  • • Oregon: 3,100 stream miles; 29,139 acres of lakes or reservoirs
  • • Washington: 5,233 stream miles; 82,610 acres of lakes or reservoirs;
  • 985 miles of marine shoreline
  • • Montana: 3,094 stream miles; 223,762 acres of lakes or reservoirs
  • • Nevada: 85 stream miles
  • In some areas, the critical habitat proposal spans shared border designations along the Columbia or Snake Rivers.
  • • Oregon/Idaho (Snake River): 170 stream miles
  • • Washington/Idaho (Snake River): 37 stream miles
  • • Washington/Oregon (Columbia): 304 stream miles
state by state percentages
State-by-State Percentages
  • Idaho:
    • 9,671 mi (43%)and 197,915 ac (37%)
  • Oregon:
    • 3,100 mi (14%) and 29,140 ac (6%)
  • Washington:
    • 6,218 mi (27%, incl. 985 of marine) and 82,610 ac (16%)
  • Montana:
    • 3,094 mi (14%) and 223,762 ac (43%)
  • Nevada:
    • 85 mi (0.4%) and 0 ac (0%)
  • Columbia and Snake River Shared Border Designations:
    • Oregon/Idaho (Snake River): 170 mi (0.8%)
    • Washington/Idaho (Snake River): 37 mi (<0.1%)
    • Washington/Oregon (Columbia): 304 mi (1%)
previous rules
Previous Rules
  • 2005 Rule
      • 4,813 mi (79% less than 2010)
      • 136,407 ac (74% less than 2010)
  • 2002-04 Proposed Rules
      • 21,935 mi (3% less than 2010)
      • 591,577 ac (10% more than 2010)
proposed designation habitat percentages
Proposed Designation: Habitat Percentages

Spawning/Rearing: 48%

Foraging/Migration/Overwinter: 52%

Occupied: 96%

Unoccupied: 4%

rationale why proposed critical habitat is essential
Rationale:Why Proposed Critical Habitat is Essential
  • “Justification Document”
  • Identifies
    • Methods used to propose critical habitat/rationale
    • Critical Habitat Units and Subunits
    • Biological indicators
    • Seven Guiding Principles
    • 104 maps
    • Occupancy data for each individual water body
  • Available at www.fws.gov/pacific/bulltrout
exemptions and exclusions
Exemptions and Exclusions
  • Military
    • 5 facilities (25 miles/16 acres habitat - based onINRMPs)
  • HCPs, Conservation Agreements, andpossibly some Native American Tribal lands
    • USFWS requests comment on excluding these identified lands from designation
economic analysis
Economic Analysis

Approximately $5 million cost per year for additional critical habitat from increased administrative costs

Small business impacts less than 1% across all sectors

Public comment requested on the economic analysis (effects of proposed rule) at: www.fws.gov/pacific/bulltrout

public forums february 2010
Public Forums, February 2010

• Bend, Oregon, 5:30-7:30 p.m. on the 2nd• Chiloquin, Oregon, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the 3rd• LaGrande, Oregon, 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on the 4th• Post Falls, Idaho, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. on the 11th• Missoula, Montana, 3 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the 16th• Elko, Nevada, 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. on the 17th• Wenatchee, Washington, 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on the 23rd• Boise, Idaho, 2010, 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. on the 25th

PUBLIC HEARING/ORAL TESTIMONY     • Boise, Idaho, from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. on the 25th

next steps
Next Steps

Public Comment Period (insert dates)

Revise proposed rule after comment period closes

Final rule: September 30, 2010

Revise and complete bull trout recovery plan

Continue implementing recovery actions

conservation actions
Conservation Actions
  • Many partners in conservation have worked successfully to conserve bull trout rangewide.
    • Connectivity: thousands of miles restored
    • Water Flows: thousands of cubic feet per second restored
    • Habitat Quality: hundreds of stream miles improved
    • Water Quality: significant improvements
    • Direct “Take:” significant protection
comments due by insert date
Comments: Due by INSERT DATE
  • Electronic mail - Federal eRulemaking Portal

http://www.regulations.gov

Docket # FWS–R1–ES–2009–0085

  • U.S. Mail
    • Public Comments Processing, Attn: FWS-R1-ES-2009-0085;Division of Policy & Directives Management; U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; 4401 N. Fairfax Drive, Suite 222; Arlington, VA 22203.
  • Hand-write comments at Public Meeting
  • Deliver oral testimony at Public Hearing