TSEM102: Virtual Worlds and Society - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

lynley
slide1 n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
TSEM102: Virtual Worlds and Society PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
TSEM102: Virtual Worlds and Society

play fullscreen
1 / 37
Download Presentation
TSEM102: Virtual Worlds and Society
111 Views
Download Presentation

TSEM102: Virtual Worlds and Society

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. TSEM102:Virtual Worlds and Society David Dahl ddahl@towson.edu Information Technology Librarian, Cook Library

  2. Today:

  3. The Research Process Selecting a Topic Interpreting the Assignment Identifying & Listing Vocabulary Reading Background Information Refining a Topic Using Online Databases & Indexes Citing Sources Evaluating Sources Gathering Sources Drafting Paper or Presentation The Research Process

  4. Using Information Ethically

  5. Plagiarism

  6. Defining Plagiarism • How would you define plagiarism? Retrieved from http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cheating.JPG

  7. Plagiarism Definition 1 • Working definition:using someone else’s wordsor ideaswithout giving proper credit

  8. Defining Plagiarism • What are some reasons to document your sources in academic work?

  9. University Policy “ ” B. Plagiarism - presenting work, products, ideas, words, or data of another as one’s own is plagiarism. Indebtedness must be acknowledged whenever: 1. one quotes another person’s actual words or replicates all or part of another’s product. This includes all information gleaned from any source, including the Internet. 2. one uses another person’s ideas, opinions, work, data, or theories, even if they are completely paraphrased in one’s own words. 3. one borrows facts, statistics, or other illustrative materials. Because expectations about academic assignments vary among disciplines and instructors, students should consult with their instructors about any special requirements related to citation. Some examples: Submitting as one’s own the work of a “ghost writer” or commercial writing service; knowingly buying or otherwise acquiring and submitting, as one’s own work any research paper or other writing assignment; submitting as one’s own, work in which portions were produced by someone acting as tutor or editor; collaborating with others on papers or projects without authorization of the instructor. In addition to oral or written work, plagiarism may also involve using, without permission and or acknowledgement, internet websites, computer programs or files, research designs, ideas and images, charts and graphs, photographs, creative works, and other types of information that belong to another. Verbatim statements must be enclosed by quotation marks, or set off from regular text as indented extracts, with full citation. http://inside.towson.edu/generalcampus/tupolicies/documents/03-01.00%20Student%20Academic%20Integrity%20Policy.pdf

  10. University Policy (penalties) “ ” The penalties that may be assessed by a faculty member for a course-related violation may include the following: 1. revision of the work in question and/or completion of alternative work, with or without a grade reduction; 2. reduced grade (including “F” or zero) for the assignment; 3. reduced grade (including “F”) for the entire course. The penalties that may be assessed by a department, college, or other academic authority for a non course-related violation may include the following: 1. failure of a comprehensive exam; 2. dismissal from an academic program; 3. dismissal from a Graduate program; 4. referral to the Office of Judicial Affairs.

  11. University Policy (penalties) “ ” A second violation will normally result in formal judicial charges being brought against the student. In addition to the sanctions listed above, sanctions for a second or subsequent violation may include: 1. suspension from the university for a designated period of time; 2. expulsion from the university; 3. any sanctions listed in the Code of Student Conduct or Graduate School Catalog. In the determination of penalties, the following factors may be considered: 1. the nature and seriousness of the offense; 2. the injury or damage resulting from the misconduct; 3. the student’s prior disciplinary record; 4. frequency of academic integrity violations.

  12. University Policy “ ” Policy Statement: The acquisition, sharing, communication, and evaluation of knowledge are at the core of a university’s mission. To realize this part of its mission, a university must be a community of trust. Because integrity is essential to the purpose of an academic community, the responsibility for maintaining standards of integrity is shared by all members of that academic community. … As responsible members of the academic community, students are obligated not to violate the basic standards of integrity. They are also expected to take an active role in encouraging other members to respect those standards.

  13. Example A Original Source • Don't look for one of these tech heavyweights to knock out the other. Yet if history is any guide, Google's approach may win out over the long term. Recall that in the early 1980s Apple lost its lead in the PC market when Microsoft enlisted the aid of hordes of software developers and dozens of PC manufacturers. Now, if Google can marshal such a united front, Apple could again be swamped by the collective innovations. Student Paper • Google's approach may win out over the long term. In the early 1980s Apple lost its lead in the PC market as Microsoft enlisted the aid of hordes of software developers and dozens of PC manufacturers.

  14. Example A Original Source • Don't look for one of these tech heavyweights to knock out the other. Yet if history is any guide, Google's approach may win out over the long term. Recall that in the early 1980s Apple lost its lead in the PC market when Microsoft enlisted the aid of hordes of software developers and dozens of PC manufacturers. Now, if Google can marshal such a united front, Apple could again be swamped by the collective innovations. Student Paper • Google's approach may win out over the long term. In the early 1980s Apple lost its lead in the PC market as Microsoft enlisted the aid of hordes of software developers and dozens of PC manufacturers.

  15. Example B Original Source: • Don't look for one of these tech heavyweights to knock out the other. Yet if history is any guide, Google's approach may win out over the long term. Recall that in the early 1980s Apple lost its lead in the PC market when Microsoft enlisted the aid of hordes of software developers and dozens of PC manufacturers. Now, if Google can marshal such a united front, Apple could again be swamped by the collective innovations. Student Paper: • History tells us that Google's approach may be successful over the long term. In the early 1980s Apple lagged in the PC market as Microsoft collaborated with software developers and dozens of PC manufacturers. Now, if Google would only summon a united front, Apple could again be swamped by the collective innovations (Burrows, 2009, p. 24).

  16. Example B Original Source: • Don't look for one of these tech heavyweights to knock out the other. Yet if history is any guide, Google's approach may win out over the long term. Recall that in the early 1980s Apple lost its lead in the PC market when Microsoft enlisted the aid of hordes of software developers and dozens of PC manufacturers. Now, if Google can marshal such a united front, Apple could again be swamped by the collective innovations. Student Paper: • History tells us that Google's approach may be successful over the long term. In the early 1980s Apple lagged in the PC market as Microsoft collaborated with software developers and dozens of PC manufacturers. Now, if Google would only summon a united front, Apple could again be swamped by the collective innovations (Burrows, 2009, p. 24).

  17. Example C Original Source: • Don't look for one of these tech heavyweights to knock out the other. Yet if history is any guide, Google's approach may win out over the long term. Recall that in the early 1980s Apple lost its lead in the PC market when Microsoft enlisted the aid of hordes of software developers and dozens of PC manufacturers. Now, if Google can marshal such a united front, Apple could again be swamped by the collective innovations. Student Paper: • Google stands a chance of beating Apple if it can benefit from the pooled ideas of software developers and device manufacturers, following the strategy that Microsoft employed to Apple’s detriment in the early ‘80s.

  18. Example C Original Source: • Don't look for one of these tech heavyweights to knock out the other. Yet if history is any guide, Google's approach may win out over the long term. Recall that in the early 1980s Apple lost its lead in the PC market when Microsoft enlisted the aid of hordes of software developers and dozens of PC manufacturers. Now, if Google can marshal such a united front, Apple could again be swamped by the collective innovations. Student Paper: • Google stands a chance of beating Apple if it can benefit from the pooled ideas of software developers and device manufacturers, following the strategy that Microsoft employed to Apple’s detriment in the early ‘80s.

  19. Example D Original Source: • Don't look for one of these tech heavyweights to knock out the other. Yet if history is any guide, Google's approach may win out over the long term. Recall that in the early 1980s Apple lost its lead in the PC market when Microsoft enlisted the aid of hordes of software developers and dozens of PC manufacturers. Now, if Google can marshal such a united front, Apple could again be swamped by the collective innovations. Student Paper: • Burrows (2009) suggests that in the battle of the “tech heavyweights” Google might eventually prevail over Apple if it follows the strategy that Microsoft employed to Apple’s detriment during the early ‘80s: collaborating, and innovating, with software developers and manufacturers (p. 24).

  20. Example D Original Source: • Don't look for one of these tech heavyweights to knock out the other. Yet if history is any guide, Google's approach may win out over the long term. Recall that in the early 1980s Apple lost its lead in the PC market when Microsoft enlisted the aid of hordes of software developers and dozens of PC manufacturers. Now, if Google can marshal such a united front, Apple could again be swamped by the collective innovations. Student Paper: • Burrows (2009) suggests that in the battle of the “tech heavyweights” Google might eventually prevail over Apple if it follows the strategy that Microsoft employed to Apple’s detriment during the early ‘80s: collaborating, and innovating, with software developers and manufacturers (p. 24).

  21. Avoiding Plagiarism

  22. Avoiding Plagiarism • Paraphrase: use the ‘close the book’ method • Keep track of the resources you consult • RefWorks, Zotero, Mendeley • Cite your sources

  23. Creating Citations

  24. Citing Correctly in APA: Exact Quote from a Source 1. “x” 2. In-text citation(Burrows, 2009, para. 5)OR (Burrows, 2009, p. 26) 3. An entry in the References list (the bibliography) at the end of the paper Every in-text citation should have a match in the bibliography

  25. Citing Correctly in APA: Citing an Idea or Fact 1. Legitimate paraphrase 2. In-text citation(Burrows, 2009) 3. An entry in the References list at the end of the paper Again, every in-text citation should have a match in the bibliography!

  26. Powerpoint: Sample Slides Distance Education • Majority of colleges had at least some online classes in 2001 (Virtual school initiatives, 2005) • Teaching online classes time-consuming, requires special techniques (Bender, 2003) • Students taking online courses must be self-starters(Thomas, 2007)

  27. Powerpoint: Sample Slides References Bender, T. (2003). Discussion-based online teaching to enhance student learning: Theory, practice, and assessment. Sterling, Va: Stylus Pub Thomas, C. (2007). Are you a candidate for distance learning? Petersons.com. Retrieved September 10, 2009, from http://www.petersons.com/distancelearning/code/articles/ distancelearncandidate2.asp Virtual school initiatives increase as study details distance learning. (2005). Electronic Education Report, 12(6), 3-5. Retrieved from Academic Search Premier database.

  28. Using and Evaluating Information

  29. Evaluating Information www.quintura.com www.wolframalpha.com www.refseek.com www.blekko.com search.yippy.com How many websites are there worldwide?

  30. Evaluating Information What number did you find? Where did you find it? How did you get there? What date is the statistic from? How was the number determined? How accurate do you think it is? Why? How many websites are there worldwide?

  31. Evaluating Information • Authorship – is there one? who? • Currency – when was it published? • Scope – is it thorough? • Accuracy – is it correct? sources cited? • Bias – is there an agenda or opinion given?

  32. Library Resources Introduction

  33. Categories of resources

  34. Articles

  35. Scholarly Journal articles

  36. Scholarly Journal Articles

  37. Anatomy of a scholarly article