museum entrance n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Museum Entrance PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Museum Entrance

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 53

Museum Entrance - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 180 Views
  • Uploaded on

Museum of Wisdom. Swagtopia. Museum Entrance. River Valley Civilizations. Classical Civilizations. Curator’s Offices. River Valley Civilizations. Room 1. Chinese River. Egypt. Mesopotamia. Indus River Valley. Return to Entry. Classical Civilizations. Room 4. Greece. Rome.

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

Museum Entrance


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    Presentation Transcript
    1. Museum of Wisdom Swagtopia Museum Entrance River Valley Civilizations Classical Civilizations Curator’s Offices

    2. River Valley Civilizations Room 1 ChineseRiver Egypt Mesopotamia Indus River Valley Return to Entry

    3. Classical Civilizations Room 4 Greece Rome Return to Entry

    4. t Egypt Room 5 Return to Entry

    5. Hieroglyphics The Egyptians used a form of record keeping known as hieroglyphics, which were pictures that symbolized words or phrases. They would carve hieroglyphics. Information: Collins, Andrew. “Egypt’s Lost Legacy and the Genesis of Civilization.” Bibliotecapleyades. 1998. web. 14 September, 2011. Picture: “heiroglyphics in a tomb.” n.d. Image. WordPress. Web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    6. Clocks Egyptians had two different types of clocks – a water clock and a sundial. Water clocks were stands with a pot on top, and at the bottom. The pot at the top had a hole drilled in the side and was filled with water, which would flow out. Depending on the water level, the Egyptians new what time is was. Information: “Technology of Ancient Egypt.” ThinkQuest. N.d. web. 14 September, 2011. Picture: “Clocks.” n.d. Image. ThinkQuest. Web. 14 September, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    7. Architecture Information: “Egyptian Architecture.” ThinkQuest. n.d. web. 10 October, 2011. Picture: “Egyptian Guardians.” n.d. Image. ThinkQuest. Web. 10 October, 2011. Egyptians specialized in architecture, and would often put sculptures of powerful gods and goddesses at the gateways and entrances to their temples and cities to protect the citizens. Return to Exhibit

    8. Statues The Egyptians would often build statues and pyramids in order to worship their mass amount of gods and goddesses. The Egyptians were polytheistic, and spent most of their free time in worship. Information: “Egypt’s Lost Legacy and the Genesis of Civilization.” Bibliotecapleyades. 1998. web. 14 September, 2011. Picture: “Anubis.” n.d. Image. DonaldIsLost. Web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    9. Egyptian Cities Information: Ashcroft, Adam. “The Ancient Egyptians.” AncientEgyptians. n.d. web. 10 October 2011. Picture: “Cities” n.d. Image. Subcreator. Web. 10 October, 2011. When the Egyptians settled a town, they took two main considerations into mind, which were how close they were to water, and how elevated the land that they were settling on was. These were extremely important because if they were too far from water, they would die of dehydration, but if they were too close to water and the land was not elevated enough, the town would most likely end up being flooded when the Nile flooded. Return to Exhibit

    10. Egypt The Egyptian Civilization was affected by geography in two major ways. The Egyptians built their whole settlement along the Nile River, which they used for water, trade, travel, and irrigation. The Egyptians were also impacted in geography by the fact that they were surrounded to the east and west by a desert, which created a barrier of defence, but also limited expansion. Information: “How Did Geography Affect Egypt.” Slideshare. N.d. web. 10 October, 2011. Picture: “Ancient Egypt Map.” n.d. Image. PowerUp. Web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    11. Curator’s Office Austin, Chris, Montana, Cody We are all hard workers and awesome. We are 10th graders in the STEM Academy at Texas High School. Place your picture here. Return to Entry

    12. Swagtopia Room 2 Return to Entry

    13. Swagginism The followers of Swagginism must have their swag up at all times. The only book they are allowed to read is the Book of Swagg. The followers also must wear Name-Brand only. They do this to respect the Swagg Gods. Picture: Butler, Micah. “What Is Generation S.W.A.G.G?” 21 May, 2010. Image. PreacherBoy. Web. 5 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    14. TFS-9273 The TFS-9273 was created out of pure titanium, and is used for quite a few different purposes. The major uses are for air force, faster travel, and space exploration. It is armed with four B-33 missiles incase of attacks from enemies. TFS stands for Technological Flying Spacecraft. Picture: “New Technology.” n.d. Image.Ultisky. Web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    15. Videotaping Swaggtopia’s citizens record all of their records on videotapes so that they can upload it to “Swaggbook” and view it from anything that can connect to the internet. Picture: “Videos.” n.d. Image. Logos Database. Web. 4 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    16. Aeronautics Swaggtopia is known as the “birthplace of Aeronautics.” Swaggtopians invented the first aircraft, building it out of pure aluminum alloy. They also do not believe in ground-transportation, due to the fact that they’ve learned that it is more environmentally and economically friendly by using air travel. Picture: “Aeronautics Logo.” 1978. Image. Logos Database. Web. 4 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    17. Flood Walls Most of Swagtopia’s cities have “Flood Walls” around them, due to the fact that a large number of them are build on small islands. The Flood Walls prevent the cities from being flooded, while still allowing the citizens to obtain water. Picture: Chaps, Jorge. “LILYPAD.” 20 July, 2008. Image. Inhabitat. Web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    18. Swaggtopia Map Swaggtopia built its cities based around the rivers, land, and where it would be easier to defend from foreign attackers. The capital, Swagg City, was established near the center of the civilization, but it was also near a large body of water, which made this region an almost ideal place for the capital. Picture: “Land Mass Outline.” n.d. Image. Fantasy Map Maker. Web. 4 October, 2011 Return to Exhibit

    19. Rome Room 5 Return to Entry

    20. Roman Religion While the Romans had Gods and Goddesses for nearly everything, they did not have one central belief. Most of their religious acts required sacrifice of either human or animal blood. Their religion is similar to the Greek religion, but it is still pretty unique. This artifact is a picture of Mars, Roman God of War. Information: “Romm Religion.” Roman Empire. n.d. web. 24 September, 2011. Picture: “Ares.” n.d. Image. Sodahead. Web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    21. Roman Records Romans kept their records by writing on parchment, papyrus, and wax tablets. Modern English letters look very similar to Roman letters, except backwards. Romans established this form of record keeping around 700 B.C. At first, they couldn’t decided whether they wanted to write left-to-right, or right-to-left, but they eventually decided left-to-right. Information: “How the Romans Wrote.” Moorstation. n.d. Web. 25 September, 2011. Picture: “Rome Records.” n.d. Image.Ancientweb. Web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    22. Roman Cities The Romans built their buildings out of plastar and stone walls. The Roman Civilization thrived for quite some time, mostly due to Julius Ceaser organizing the growth of it. The main city of Rome was burned down and destroyed by a huge fire in 64 A.D., and they had to rebuild it from scratch, but they still lost most of their records and documents. Information: “Rome.” MCE. n.d. web. 25 September, 2011. Picture: “The Forum Romanum. Curran, Leo. n.d. Image. MCE. Web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    23. Roman Art The Romans specialized in art, which they began to really start doing around 500 B.C. As the empire grew, so did the number of artists that there were. Out of all of the influences that Roman Art had, Christianity was the strongest apparent one there was, which began to appear around 300 A.D. In 200 A.D., there was a strong German influence, and the art began to show people suffering by having their heads cut off, insides ripped out, and other sorts of gruesome acts. Information: “Roman Art.” ThinkQuest. n.d. web. 24 September, 2011. Picture: “Rome Sculpture.” Greek Roman Art. n.d. web. 10 October, 2011. . Return to Exhibit

    24. Hypocaust The Romans invented the Hypocaust inorder to keep their homes heated. They did this by elevating the floors and keeping a fire in the furnace. This kept the air heated, and the warm air would move through the house, heating the house. Information: Bill, M.S. “Hypocaust.” About. n.d. web. 24 September, 2011. Picture: “Roman Hypocausts.” Hot Floors. n.d. web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    25. Rome The Roman civilization was established in a location that centered around trade and transportation. They also had a good location for defense from foreign invaders. Rome was located on the Tyrrhenian Sea, and on the Tibet River, which made it easy for them to travel and trade. Information: “The Impact of Geography on Ancient Rome.” Flow of History. n.d. web. 24 September, 2011. Picture: “Rome.” n.d. Image. Verselink. Web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    26. Greece Room 5 Return to Entry

    27. Tablets The Greeks kept their records by writing on clay tablets. Their records would consist of art techniques, festival schedules, laws, etc. Most historians believe that their form of record keeping is closely related to that of the Ancient Macedonians. Information: Joseph, Brian. “Greek, Ancient.” Ohio State University. N.d. web. 26 September, 2011. Picture: Mundigler, Christian. “Old Record.” n.d. Image. NY Times. Web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    28. Zeus Zeus, Roman God of the Sky, is one of the many gods and goddesses that the Greeks worshipped. Their religion was very similar to that of the Romans, but the gods and goddesses had different names. Greeks also offered animals to the gods to show their worship. Information: Joseph, Brian. “Greek, Ancient.” Ohio State University. N.d. web. 26 September, 2011. Picture: “Zeus.” Designdazzling. N.d. web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    29. Sword & Shield The Greeks were of the first to use metal armor in warfare. Their warriors had helmets, armor, and weaponry usually made of brass to use during times of war. This made them fearsome enemies and scared off many would-be attackers. Information: “Selected Greek Armor.” Greek Warriors. n.d. web. 10 October, 2011. Picture: “Swords and Shield.” n.d. Image. Friend Of Mercy. Web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    30. Art The Greeks specialized in art. Ancient Greek Art consists primarily of vases, statues, and architecture, which at the time were a huge innovation in a variety of things. Greek art changed multiple times throughout the years, but it ended up being similar to how it originally began. Information: “Greek Art (An Overview).” About. n.d. web. 10 October, 2011. Picture: “Greek Art.” n.d. Image. WikiSpaces. Web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    31. Greek Cities Ancient Greece was made up of city-states, but each city-state had its own form of government and its own army. The two largest of these were Athens and Sparta. Information: Doleys, Teri. “Ancient Greece.” Cedarville. n.d. web. 10 October, 2011. Picture: “Sparta Ruins.” n.d. Image. Around Greece. Web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    32. Greece The Greeks built their civilization based around trade. They did not worry about farming, due to the fact that they were surrounded by water and trade routes. The mountains also served as natural barriers and boundaries for Greece’s city-states. Information: Joseph, Brian. “Greek, Ancient.” Ohio State University. N.d. web. 26 September, 2011. Picture: “Map of Greece in 431 BC.” n.d. Image. Earth History. Web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    33. Mesopotamia Room 3 Return to Entry

    34. Star of Ishtar Ishtar was a Mesopotamian Goddess. The Mesopotamians were polytheistic, meaning that they worshipped many different gods and goddesses. They would paint and carve the symbols of the gods and goddesses into architecture to show their worship. Information: “Religion in Mesopotamia and Primary Gods.” Ancient Civilizations History. n.d. web. 14 September, 2011. Picture: “Symbol of Goddess Ishtar.” n.d. Image. Ancient Civilizations History. Web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    35. Metal Tools Around 4000 B.C. Mesopotamians discovered how to make bronze tools and weapons. Since they were more effective, there was a high demand in them, which also caused more people to become metalworkers. Information: “Specialization of Labor-Mesopotamia.” Period90910. n.d. web. 12 September, 2011. Picture: “Metal Tools.” n.d. Image. Period90910. web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    36. Ziggurats The Mesopotamians specialized in labor, mainly because the less privileged people often became slaves or servants in wealthy homes and learned to work and cultivated the farm lands. Mesopotamians built ziggurats to worship their gods and goddesses. One of their most impressive buildings was a ziggurat built for the fertility Goddess, Inanna, which took 1,500 laborers working ten hours a day for five years. Information: “Specialization of Labor-Mesopotamia.” Period90910. n.d. web. 12 September, 2011. Picture: “Ziggurats.” n.d. Image. Period90910. web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    37. Cuneiform Mesopotamians used cuneiform to keep their records. Cuneiform was a type of script which consisted of pictures which symbolized words, very similar to heiroglyphics. Mesopotamians would draw their cuneiforms into clay tablets and let the clay harden so that their records became permanent. Information: “Mesopotamia.” Classics Technology Center. n.d. web. 12 September, 2011. Picture: “The Beginnings of Writing.” n.d. Image. Classics Technology Center. Web. 12 September, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    38. Mesopotamia Mesopotamia itself means “between two rivers.” It is located between the Tigris River and the Euphrates River. The Sumerians settled into the region around 4,000 B.C, which marked the first civilization. Information: “Mesopotamia. & Ancient Persia” Taxson. n.d. web. 12 September, 2011. Picture: “Mesopotamia.” n.d. Image. Taxson. Web. 12 September, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    39. Mesopotamian Cities Mesopotamian cities developed along the rivers due to the fact that Mesopotamians were primarily farmers. The river water helped irrigate the land along the banks in order to help the crops grow. Information: “Ancient Mesopotamia.” Kture Kharkov. n.d. web. 10 October, 2011. Picture: “Babylon.” n.d. Kture Kharkov. n.d. web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    40. t Indus River Valley Room 5 Return to Entry

    41. Indus River Valley The Indus River Valley established its civilization near the Himalayan Mountains. They got their water from the Himalaya’s torrents of water, which also helped irrigate the soil, but created monsoons in lowlands, which eventually caused people to die. Information: Guisepi, R.A. “Indus River Valley Civilization.” MrDowling. n.d. web. 10 October, 2011. Picture: “Map of Indus Valley.” n.d. Image. History-World. Web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    42. Indus River Valley Cities Archaeologists found two 4000-year-old cities along the banks of the Indus River which they named Mohenjo-Daro, which means “hill of the dead,” and Harappa. The buildings of the cities were up to three-stories and built of sturdy bricks, with elaborate drainage systems. Not much is known about what really happened to the civilization, but it seems to have been abandoned near 1700 B.C. Information: “Mohenjo-Daro and Harappa.” Mr Dowling. N.d. web. 10 October, 2011. Picture: “Mohenjo-Daro.” n.d. Image. History Kal World. Web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    43. Pottery The citizens of the Indus River Valley specialized in a variety of thing, but one major thing would be art. A lot of the artists were potters, which they would do in their free time, either to sell their crafts or so that they’ll have something to store their things in from their main occupation. Information: “Indus Valley Civilization.” infoplease. n.d. web. 10 October, 2011.Picture: “Indus Valley Pottery 2” n.d. Image. JHTerry Gallery. Web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    44. Stamp Seal Some people of the Indus Valley Civilization used forms of cuneiform, but their pictures that they drew do not have as apparent of a meaning as most. They also developed a writing system that was used for several hundred years, but we still are unable to read the words that they wrote. Information: “The 3 Great River Valleys.” His 1010 World History. 2011. web. 10 October, 2011. Picture: “Stamp Seal.” n.d. Image. His 1010 World History. Web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    45. Religion The Indus mainly expressed their religious beliefs through art and architecture, because they believed that they were more important than religion. The Indus were mainly Hindu, which were polytheistic. Information: “Indu Religion.” MrPlasko. n.d. web. 10 October, 2011. Picture: “Hinduism.” n.d. Image. MrPlasko. Web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    46. Drainage System The first plumming systems appeared by 2700 BC in the Indus River Valley Civilizations, but overall there were no real fast improvements. Some time before the Indu Civilization disappeared, they developed an elegant drainage system that was well ahead of their time and technology. Not much is known about what caused them to create such an extremely well designed system, but it works nearly aswell as modern day drainage systems, except it is more public. Information: “Plumbing History.” Expert Plumbing Directory. 09 November, 2010. web. 10 October, 2011. Picture: “Indu Plumbing.” n.d. Expert Plumbing Directory. Web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    47. t Chinese River Room 5 Return to Entry

    48. Chinese River The Huang He river streatches across China over 2,900 miles and carries rich yellow silt all through China, which improves the farm land. The river also helps with trade and travel, since most of China is surrounded by mountain ranges and river valleys. Information: “Yellow River Valley Civilization.” The River Valley Civilization Guide. n.d. web. 10 October, 2011. Picture: “Yellow River Valley Civilization.” n.d. Image. The River Valley Civilization Guide. n.d. web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    49. Chinese Cities The king ruled from Anyang, the capital. He divided his kingdom into territories that were ruled by the military leaders, but the king still had the power to add or remove them whenever he chose. They also believed tat they could talk to the gods whenever they wished and receive help when needed. Information: “Yellow River Valley Civilization.” The River Valley Civilization Guide. n.d. web. 10 October, 2011. Picture: “Yellow River Valley Civilization.” n.d. Image. The River Valley Civilization Guide. n.d. web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit

    50. Literature The Chinese were the first to create written books, which is what they used to keep their records in. They also wrote stories and ancient rituals in these books so that they could pass them down through generations. Information: “Yellow River Valley Civilization.” The River Valley Civilization Guide. n.d. web. 10 October, 2011. Picture: “Yellow River Valley Civilization.” n.d. Image. The River Valley Civilization Guide. n.d. web. 10 October, 2011. Return to Exhibit