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Improving Outcomes for Children and Youth through Collective Impact. February 15, 2012. National League of Cities Webinar. Today’s Webinar. C oncepts and Elements of Collective Impact Examples from NLC Members Questions and Answers. FSG and NLC Presenters.

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Improving outcomes for children and youth through collective impact

Improving Outcomes for Children and Youth through Collective Impact

February 15, 2012

National League of Cities Webinar


Today s webinar
Today’s Webinar Impact

  • Concepts and Elements of Collective Impact

  • Examples from NLC Members

  • Questions and Answers


Fsg and nlc presenters
FSG and NLC Presenters Impact

  • Jeff Kutash, Managing Director, Head of Education & Youth Practice, FSG

  • Emily Gorin, Senior Consultant, FSG

  • Douglas Scarboro, Executive Director, Office of Talent and Human Capital and Education Liaison to the Mayor, City of Memphis, TN

  • Sid Sidorowicz, Strategic Advisor, Office for Education, City of Seattle, WA


Fsg overview
FSG Overview Impact

  • Nonprofit consulting firm specializing in strategy, evaluation and research with offices in Boston, Seattle, San Francisco, DC, Geneva, and Mumbai

  • Partner with foundations, corporations, nonprofits, and governments to develop more effective solutions to the world’s most challenging issues

  • Recognized thought leader in social impact, philanthropy and corporate social responsibility

  • Staff of 95 full-time professionalswith passion and experience to solve social problems

  • Advancing Collective Impact via publications, conferences, speaking engagements, client projects


Juvenile justice in new york
Juvenile Justice in New York Impact

$286,000

=

89% recidivism rate


Improving outcomes for children and youth through collective impact

Actors In the New York Juvenile Justice System Impact

Source: FSG interviews and analysis; State of NY Juvenile Justice Advisory Group, “State of NY, 2009–2011: Three-Year Comprehensive State Plan for the JJ and Delinquency Prevention Formula Grant Program.”


There are several types of problems
There Are Several Types of Problems Impact

Simple

Complicated

Complex

Baking a Cake

Sending a Rocket to the Moon

Rehabilitating a Youth

Social sector treats problems as simple or complicated

Source: Adapted from “Getting to Maybe”


Traditional approaches not solving our toughest often complex challenges
Traditional Approaches Not Solving Our Toughest – Often Complex – Challenges

IsolatedImpact

  • Funders select individual grantees

  • Organizations work separately and compete

  • Evaluationattempts to isolatea particular organization’s impact

  • Large scale change is assumed to depend on scaling organizations

  • Corporate and government sectors are often disconnected from foundations and nonprofits


Imagine a different approach multiple players working together to solve complex issues
Imagine a Different Approach – Multiple Players Working Together to Solve Complex Issues

  • All working toward the same goal and measuring the same things

  • Cross-sector alignment with government, nonprofit, philanthropicand corporate sectors as partners

  • Organizations actively coordinating their action and sharing lessons learned

Isolated Impact

Collective Impact


Achieving large scale change through collective impact involves five key elements
Achieving Large-Scale Change through Collective Impact Involves Five Key Elements

Common Agenda

  • Common understanding of the problem

  • Shared vision for change

  • Collecting data andmeasuring results

  • Focus on performance management

  • Shared accountability

Shared Measurement

  • Differentiated approaches

  • Willingness to adapt individual activities

  • Coordination through joint plan of action

Mutually Reinforcing Activities

Continuous Communication

  • Consistent and open communication

  • Focus on building trust

  • Separate organization(s) with staff

  • Resources and skills to convene and coordinate participating organizations

Backbone Support

Source: Channeling Change: Making Collective Impact Work, 2012; FSG Interviews


The collective impact approach can apply to solving many complex social issues
The Collective Impact Approach Can Apply to Solving Many Complex Social Issues

Homelessness

Healthcare

Education

*

Economic Development

Youth Development

Community Development

*

*

*


A champion funding and urgency for change are all key to launching a collective impact initiative
A Champion, Funding, and Urgency for Change Are All Key to Launching a Collective Impact Initiative

Influential Champion

  • Commands respect and engages cross-sector leaders

  • Focused on solving problem but allows participants to figure out answers for themselves

Financial Resources

$

  • Committed funding partners

  • Sustained funding for at least 2-3 years

  • Pays for needed infrastructure and planning

Urgency for Change

  • Critical problem in the community

  • Frustration with existing approaches

  • Multiple actors calling for change

  • Engaged funders and policy makers

Source: Channeling Change: Making Collective Impact Work, 2012; FSG Interviews


Collective impact efforts tend to develop over three key phases

Governance & Launching a Collective Impact Initiative

Infrastructure

Strategic

Planning

Collective Impact Efforts Tend to Develop Over Three Key Phases

Community

Involvement

Phase I

Initiate Action

Phase II

Organize for Impact

Phase III

Sustain Action and Impact

Components for Success

Evaluation &

Improvement

Develop group; structure communication and decision making

Create infrastructure/ backbone and processes

Facilitate and refine

Map the landscape and use data to make case

Create common agenda (common goals, strategy)

Support implementation; alignment to goal/strategies

Facilitate community outreach

Engage community, build public will

Continue engagement, conduct advocacy

Analyze baseline data to ID key issues and gaps

Establish shared metrics, indicators, measurement approach

Collect/track/report progress; process to learn and improve

Source: Channeling Change: Making Collective Impact Work, 2012; FSG Interviews


Backbone organizations require a unique skill set to support collective impact efforts
Backbone Launching a Collective Impact InitiativeOrganizations Require a Unique Skill-Set to Support Collective Impact Efforts

Highlights of Successful Backbones

  • Have high credibility

  • Seen as neutral convener

  • Have dedicated staff

  • Build key relationships

  • Frame issues

  • Create a sense of urgency

  • Promote learning

  • Balance inclusivity vs. expediency

*These skills can exist within a single organization or within another organization in the effort.




Improving outcomes for children and youth through collective impact
Strive FunctionsIs an Education Collaborative in Cincinnati That Is a Best-in-Class Example of Collective Impact

1

2

Common Agenda

Shared Measurement

  • Programs working on the same activity measure results on the same criteria

  • Use Six Sigma to improve performance across organizations

  • Vision: Improving educational outcomes for all children in the Cincinnati, Northern Kentucky region from “cradle to career”

3

4

5

Mutually Reinforcing Activities

Continuous Communication

Backbone Support Organization

  • 300 organizations work on5 key points in the education pipeline

  • Use evidence-based strategies

  • Networks have met regularly for more than five years

  • Use web-based tools, such as Google Groups

  • Strive is an independent nonprofit: 8 staff, $1.5M annual budget

  • Strive supports technology, facilitation and communications


Improving outcomes for children and youth through collective impact
The New York Juvenile Justice System Uses Collective Impact to Improve Public Safety and Youth Outcomes

1

2

Shared Measurement

Common Agenda

  • Key system-wide outcomes tracked across organizations, specific indicators by strategy

  • Aggregate, system-wide data and outcomes made public

  • Vision: Improving public safety and youth outcomes in communities across the state

3

4

5

Mutually Reinforcing Activities

Continuous Communication

Backbone Support Organization

  • Developed strategies and action steps for system governance/coordination, service continuum, shared data, accountability

  • Prioritize activities to pursue in the near-term

  • Routine updates to and from state and local actors

  • Regular meetings of steering group and work groups

  • Strategic Planning Action Committee (SPAC) and supporting staff oversee implementation

  • Workgroups launched in data use and continuum


Improving outcomes for children and youth through collective impact
The Community Center for Education Results Is Also Pursuing to Improve Public Safety and Youth Outcomesa Collective Impact Approach to Education in Seattle

  • Appendix

Collective Impact Need

  • Unacceptable achievement gaps for low income students and children of color, as well as low achievement rates from cradle to college and career in South Seattle and South King County

  • “Road Map Project”: new initiative aimed at dramatic improvement in student achievement – cradle through college/career in South Seattle, South King County

  • Goal: “to double the number of students in South King County and South Seattle on track to graduate from college or earn career credential by 2020

  • Working groups are coordinating action in 4 areas (10-12 cross sector people per group):

    • Early learning

    • Kindergarten to 12th grade

    • Post secondary success

    • Community Support

  • Shared set of indicators measuring progress towards: (1) healthy and ready for Kindergarten, (2) supported and successful in school, (3) graduate from high school --college and career-ready, (4) earn a college degree or career credential

  • The Community Center for Education Results is the “backbone” organization for this effort,

  • providing dedicated staff to support the initiative

Solution and Goal

Implementation

Backbone(s)


The roadmap participants have agreed on one framework and one set of success measures
The Roadmap Participants Have Agreed on One Framework and One Set of Success Measures

  • Appendix

Readiness

Achievement

Attainment

Graduate from high school --college and career-ready

Healthy and ready for Kindergarten

Supported and successful in school

Earn a college degree or career credential

  • % children meeting kindergarten readiness standards

  • % children accessing comprehensive medical and dental care

  • % eligible children enrolled in evidence-based early learning programs

  • % students proficient in 3rd grade reading

  • % students proficient in 4th grade math

  • % 9th graders who pass end of course algebra exam

  • % students motivated and engaged to succeed in school

  • % students who are not triggering all three Early Warning indicators

  • % parents who believe a college degree is important and actively support their child’s education

  • % students graduating high school meeting proposed Washington State graduation requirements

  • % students who take SAT/ACT and/or take a community college placement test in high school

  • % high school graduates who take developmental education courses in college

  • % students who earn a post-secondary credential by age 26

  • % students who enroll in postsecondary education

  • % students who persist year to year


Collective impact requires four big mindset shifts
Collective Impact Requires Four Big Mindset Shifts One Set of Success Measures

  • Adaptive vs. Technical Solutions

  • Silver Buckshot vs. Silver Bullets

  • Credibility vs. Credit

  • Coordination vs. Competition

Context

Strategy + Process + Trust


City based efforts that involve municipal government have unique considerations
City-Based Efforts that Involve Municipal Government Have Unique Considerations

Sample Considerations

  • Geographic scope (city vs. county vs. region)

  • Role of policy makers / elected officials and the need for a policy agenda

  • Backbone organization or staff within government

  • Use of political capital and convening power to promote and support collective impact

  • Silos / funding streams that need to be aligned

  • Opportunity to catalyze and / or fund efforts


Thank you for joining us today
Thank You for Joining Us Today! Unique Considerations

  • To talk more with FSG about Collective Impact:

  • Jeff Kutash, Managing Director jeff.kutash@fsg.org

  • Emily Malenfant, Senior Consultant– emily.malenfant@fsg.org

Collective Impact resources available on FSG’s website: http://fsg.org/KnowledgeExchange/FSGApproach/CollectiveImpact.aspx


City of seattle

City of Seattle Unique Considerations

Shared Measurement


Improving outcomes for children and youth through collective impact

Steering Committee Unique Considerations

Improving Outcomes for Children and Youth through Collective Impact

PeopleFirstPartnership

February 15, 2012

  • Develop a plan focused on the fundamentals

  • Prioritize strategies

  • Establish public/private sector alignment

  • Ground plan in best practices, facts and research

  • Incorporate broad base of community input (MFF based on voices of more than 3000 people)

  • Be innovative, but build on existing assets and momentum


Improving outcomes for children and youth through collective impact

Steering Committee Unique Considerations

  • PeopleFirst Partnership Mission: Grow, attract and retain talent in Memphis/Shelby County.

  • Core Activities:

  • Identify and prioritize actionable, measurable initiatives with game-changing impact on key performance metrics.

  • Encourage collaboration among partners and stakeholders.

  • Advocate for local and state policy reform and public/private sector investment that advances our agenda.

  • Monitor implementation progress using reliable, measurable information

  • Communicate results to the community.

  • Develop a plan focused on the fundamentals

  • Prioritize strategies

  • Establish public/private sector alignment

  • Ground plan in best practices, facts and research

  • Incorporate broad base of community input (MFF based on voices of more than 3000 people)

  • Be innovative, but build on existing assets and momentum

5


Improving outcomes for children and youth through collective impact

Steering Committee Unique Considerations

The PeopleFirst Partnership drives the Education and Talent agenda of Memphis Fast Forward.

18-Member

Memphis Fast Forward

Steering Committee

Co-chairs:

Gary Shorb, Methodist Health Care

A C Wharton, Jr., Mayor, City of Memphis

Mark H. Luttrell, Jr., Mayor, Shelby County

  • Develop a plan focused on the fundamentals

  • Prioritize strategies

  • Establish public/private sector alignment

  • Ground plan in best practices, facts and research

  • Incorporate broad base of community input (MFF based on voices of more than 3000 people)

  • Be innovative, but build on existing assets and momentum

Memphis Shelby

Growth Alliance

Dr. Bill Evans, Director & CEO

St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital

Chairman

Operation Safe Community

Bill Gibbons, Director

TN Dept. of Safety & Homeland Security

Chairman

PeopleFirst Partnership

Gary Shorb, President & CEO

Methodist LeBonheur Healthcare

Chairman

Government Efficiency

Mayor A C Wharton, Jr.

Mayor Mark H. Luttrell, Jr.

Co-chairs

Growth Alliance

Board

Crime Commission

Board

PeopleFirst Partnership

Board

4


Improving outcomes for children and youth through collective impact

Steering Committee Unique Considerations

  • Identifying our priority initiatives.

  • In 2010 a Planning Council identified Key metrics, 4 Goals, 10 Strategies and a proposed set of priority initiatives for our starting point.

  • Develop a plan focused on the fundamentals

  • Prioritize strategies

  • Establish public/private sector alignment

  • Ground plan in best practices, facts and research

  • Incorporate broad base of community input (MFF based on voices of more than 3000 people)

  • Be innovative, but build on existing assets and momentum

6


Improving outcomes for children and youth through collective impact

Steering Committee Unique Considerations

4 Goals, 10 Strategies and potential initiatives.

Goal A. Children enter kindergarten “ready to learn”

Goal C. Adults earn certifications and college degrees that prepare for local careers

Goal D. Talent is attracted to and retained in M/SC

Goal B. Youth graduate high school “college ready”

  • Develop a plan focused on the fundamentals

  • Prioritize strategies

  • Establish public/private sector alignment

  • Ground plan in best practices, facts and research

  • Incorporate broad base of community input (MFF based on voices of more than 3000 people)

  • Be innovative, but build on existing assets and momentum

PeopleFirst Partnership will dedicate an upcoming Board meeting to review and consideration of key K-12 efforts that should be included in the new unified system. We will provide our conclusions to the transition commission and unified board, as well as make sure our agenda is informed by their thinking.

8


Improving outcomes for children and youth through collective impact

Steering Committee Unique Considerations

Key Metrics

  • Develop a plan focused on the fundamentals

  • Prioritize strategies

  • Establish public/private sector alignment

  • Ground plan in best practices, facts and research

  • Incorporate broad base of community input (MFF based on voices of more than 3000 people)

  • Be innovative, but build on existing assets and momentum

7


Improving outcomes for children and youth through collective impact

Steering Committee Unique Considerations

  • Criteria for considering adoption of priority initiatives.

  • Major “game-changing” impact on one of our four goals, metrics.

  • Research-informed rationale for success.

  • Leadership controls the necessary resources to effectively oversee implementation OR If the effort is steered by a collaborative, it has clearly established roles and accountabilities as part of formal agreements or MOUs

  • Action plan for 2012 with realistic objectives and metrics.

  • Leverages existing resources for greater achievement (e.g. new partnerships, new methods, redirecting resources to new priorities)

  • Develop a plan focused on the fundamentals

  • Prioritize strategies

  • Establish public/private sector alignment

  • Ground plan in best practices, facts and research

  • Incorporate broad base of community input (MFF based on voices of more than 3000 people)

  • Be innovative, but build on existing assets and momentum

10