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Utah State University’s Institute for Outdoor Recreation and Tourism. Opportunities and Challenges in Resource-Based Tourism Development.

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utah state university s institute for outdoor recreation and tourism

Utah State University’sInstitute for Outdoor Recreation and Tourism

Opportunities and Challenges

in Resource-Based

Tourism Development

slide2

Utah State University’sInstitute for Outdoor Recreation and TourismOpportunities and Challenges in Resource-Based Tourism Development

  • Utah Tourism at a Glance--1999
  • Tourism as a Community Development Industry
  • Tourism Development and Change
  • Community Tourism Development
slide3

Utah State University’sInstitute for Outdoor Recreation and TourismOpportunities and Challenges in Resource-Based Tourism Development

  • USU’s Institute for Outdoor Recreation and Tourism
    • Mission
    • Program Framework
    • Program Functions
    • Research and Extension Focus
slide4

Utah State University’sInstitute for Outdoor Recreation and TourismOpportunities and Challenges in Resource-Based Tourism Development

  • Amenity Resources and Natural Amenities
  • Resource-Based Tourism
  • Marketing Utah’s Tourism Product
  • Opportunities and Challenges
utah tourism at a glance 1999
UTAH TOURISM AT A GLANCE--1999
  • Estimated 18.2 million non-resident person-trips to Utah
  • 700,000 international visits (3.8% of total non-resident visitation)
  • Utah residents are also “tourists.”

Statistics from Utah Division of Travel Development

utah tourism at a glance 19996
UTAH TOURISM AT A GLANCE--1999
  • Tourism is among Utah’s “Top 5” economic activities. (manufacturing, trade, services, government)
  • $4.2 billion in traveler spending for Utah’s economy
  • Over 7% of Utah’s Gross State Product

Statistics from Utah Division of Travel Development

utah tourism at a glance 19997
UTAH TOURISM AT A GLANCE--1999
  • $336 million generated in state and local taxes
  • $158 per Utah resident generated by out-of-state tourists
  • These taxes help pay for services and infrastructure that residents enjoy.

Statistics from Utah Division of Travel Development

utah tourism at a glance 19998
UTAH TOURISM AT A GLANCE--1999
  • 119,500 total jobs in travel and tourism related industries
    • 67,000 direct jobs
    • 52,500 indirect and induced jobs
  • 11.4% of total non-agricultural employment

Statistics from Utah Division of Travel Development

tourism as a community development industry
TOURISM AS A COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT INDUSTRY
  • Creates recreational uses for natural and human-made amenity resources and converts these into income producing assets.(Siehl 1990; Willits 1992)
tourism as a community development industry10
TOURISM AS A COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT INDUSTRY
  • Tourism is generally perceived as a “clean industry” with few serious environmental impacts.

(Grambling & Freudenburg 1990; Marchak 1990; McCool 1992; Weeks 1990)

tourism as a community development industry11
TOURISM AS A COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT INDUSTRY
  • Creates a “new sense” of community pride among local residents.

(Willits 1992)

  • Plays an important part in the process of community development, helping to ensure the protection and preservation of environmental and community amenities. (McCool 1987)
tourism as a community development industry12
TOURISM AS A COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT INDUSTRY
  • Offers key opportunities for developing interactions within a community, leading to relationships between and among community members and allowing for the natural emergence of other community networks.

(Burr & Walsh 1994; Wilkinson 1992)

tourism development
TOURISM DEVELOPMENT

BRINGS CHANGE!!!

Associated Impacts

Positives & Negatives

Benefits & Costs

tourism development14
TOURISM DEVELOPMENT

BRINGS CHANGE!!!

Benefits & Costs

  • To the local society
  • To the economy
  • To the environment
community tourism development
COMMUNITY TOURISM DEVELOPMENT
  • Important to weigh benefits and costs.
  • What will the benefits and costs be for a community?
  • Who benefits? Who shares the costs?
  • Are the associated costs acceptable?
  • Can costs be minimized… ...while maximizing benefits?
important questions
IMPORTANT QUESTIONS
  • In 1998, Utah State Legislature approved Senate Bill 35.
  • To provide continuing funding to Utah State University
  • To establish and support an interdisciplinary program of research, extension, and teaching
a better understanding
A BETTER UNDERSTANDING
  • To better understand the relationships between:
    • outdoor recreation and tourism
    • natural resources management
    • community economic vitality
    • quality of life issues for the citizens of Utah
institute for outdoor recreation and tourism

Institute for Outdoor Recreation and Tourism

College of Natural Resources

Utah State University

mission of the institute
Mission of the Institute

The Institute for Outdoor Recreation and Tourism (IORT) conducts a program of research, extension, and teaching for the benefit of the people of Utah, our country, and the world, directed at improving our understanding of the relationships between outdoor recreation and tourism, natural resources management, community economic vitality, and quality of life.

institute for outdoor recreation and tourism20
Statewide collaboration and cooperation

Source for the creation, communication, and transfer of knowledge

On natural resource-based recreation and tourism issues affecting social, economic, and environmental systems

Institute for Outdoor Recreation and Tourism
institute for outdoor recreation and tourism21
Institute for Outdoor Recreation and Tourism
  • To assist Utah’s citizens in making decisions that enhance both community and resource sustainability
a program framework for iort
A PROGRAM FRAMEWORK FOR IORT

USU/IORT Functions

Research/Extension Topics

Outdoor Recreation/Tourism Issues

Research Extension Teaching

Community Sustainability (Social & Economic)

Environmental Sustainability (Environmental & Economic)

Statewide Collaboration and Coordination

iort program functions
IORT Program Functions
  • Research Function
  • Extension Function
  • Teaching Function
research function
Research Function
  • Identify research needs in outdoor recreation and tourism for local communities, counties, travel regions, and natural resource management agencies in Utah.
  • Define relevant issues and help coordinate public and private sector efforts to study and solve problems.
research function25
Research Function
  • Identify and generate supplemental research funds from state, federal, and private sources.
  • Provide a clearinghouse for research data, publications, and reports.
  • Collaborate with scientists and professional to develop and report related research.
extension function
Extension Function
  • Provide an Extension Specialist in Outdoor Recreation and Tourism.
  • Offer consulting and training sessions in outdoor recreation and tourism development.
  • Maintain mailing lists of scientists, professionals, public officials, and organizations in affiliated fields.
extension function27
Extension Function
  • Publish and distribute Extension and Research Reports.
  • Work with Extension Specialists.
  • Work with County Extension Agents.
  • Utilize Extension’s network to reach a diverse public.
teaching function
Teaching Function
  • Offer courses in continuing education for outdoor recreation and tourism professionals.
  • Offer courses and advise under- graduate and graduate students at USU in outdoor recreation and tourism, economic valuation, and community development.
teaching function29
Teaching Function
  • Coordinate programs with other state instructional programs to meet needs and avoid redundancy.
a research and extension focus
A Research and Extension Focus
  • Studies of social, economic, and environmental benefits and costs of outdoor recreation and tourism for travel regions, counties, and local communities in Utah.
a research and extension focus31
A Research and Extension Focus
  • Goal: To understand these benefits and costs to help:
    • maximize positive aspects of outdoor recreation and tourism development;
    • minimize potential negative aspects;
    • and mitigate unavoidable social, economic, and environmental impacts.
a research and extension focus32
A Research and Extension Focus
  • Focus on the role outdoor recreation and tourism play in local community development.
  • Generate empirical data useful for decision making and policy formulation and implementation.
specific areas of focus
Specific Areas of Focus
  • Role of outdoor recreation and tourism in economic diversification
  • Social, economic, and environmental effects of outdoor recreation and tourism in resource-dependent communities
specific areas of focus34
Specific Areas of Focus
  • Identifying potential opportunities for synergistic approaches between traditional commodity-oriented uses of public lands and newer pressures for outdoor recreation and tourism
specific areas of focus35
Specific Areas of Focus
  • Relationships between outdoor recreation-related public land management policies and local economic development
help communities better understand and deal with
HELP COMMUNITIESbetter understand and deal with
  • Economic development opportunities resulting from growth in outdoor recreation and tourism
  • Collaborative decision making between local residents and public and private recreation providers
help communities better understand and deal with37
HELP COMMUNITIESbetter understand and deal with
  • Developing other funding sources for defraying costs resulting from growth in outdoor recreation and tourism
  • Reducing conflict between local residents, outdoor recreationists, and tourists
  • Integrating recreational opportunities and other resource uses in rural areas
spring 2000 speaker series on resource based recreation and tourism
SPRING 2000 SPEAKER SERIESOn Resource-Based Recreation and Tourism
  • Dr. Thomas M. Power University of Montana “The Economic Role of Natural Amenities: Escaping the Tourist Trap”
  • Dr. Hal K. Rothman University of Nevada—Las Vegas “Recreational Tourism and the American West: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Winnebagos and Mountain Bikes”
  • Jared Farmer Author of Glen Canyon Dammed “Why Does Lake Powell Matter?”
spring 2000 speaker series on resource based recreation and tourism39
SPRING 2000 SPEAKER SERIESOn Resource-Based Recreation and Tourism
  • Dr. David Scott Texas A&M University “An Exploration of Birdwatching as a Mechanism for Nature Tourism Development”
  • Mr. Brooke Williams Environmental Consultant, Confluence Associates “Recreation, Tourism, and Economic Development in Rural Southern Utah Communities”
  • Mr. Dean Reeder Director, Utah Division of Travel Development “Economic Contribution of Tourism in Utah”
spring 2000 speaker series on resource based recreation and tourism40
SPRING 2000 SPEAKER SERIESOn Resource-Based Recreation and Tourism
  • Mr. Brad Barber Deputy Director, Governor’s Office of Planning and Budget “Public Lands Management for the Next Millennium”
  • Mr. Courtland Nelson Director, Utah DNR Division of Parks and Recreation “The Role of State Parks in Resource-Based Tourism in Utah”
  • Dr. Steve Burr Director, USU Institute for Outdoor Recreation and Tourism “USU’s Institute for Outdoor Recreation and Tourism: Opportunities and Challenges in Resource-Based Tourism Development in Utah”
amenity resources
AMENITY RESOURCES
  • Local non-transportable goods/services that include natural, cultural, institutional, commercial, economic features
  • Natural amenities becoming more and more valuable
natural amenities
NATURAL AMENITIES
  • Many Utahns are asking that public lands be managed for recreational, scenic, wildlife, and other amenity values.
  • Different values of open space--sacrosanct/sacred space
natural amenities43
NATURAL AMENITIES
  • People valuing different places, different experiences, in different ways
  • People using the “hinterlands” as playgrounds
natural amenities44
NATURAL AMENITIES
  • Attract new residents, businesses, and economic activity
  • Need for collaborative and cooperative approaches in order to produce “win-win” situations in preserving and protecting Utah’s natural amenities.
natural amenities45
NATURAL AMENITIES
  • Contribute to quality of life in Utah
        • Socially
        • Economically
        • Environmentally
resource based tourism
RESOURCE-BASED TOURISM
  • Based on Utah’s natural resources and natural amenities
  • Good news--bright future for tourism!
  • Short term looks good.
  • Tourism economic growth rate of 8% is outpacing the rest of the service sector.
resource based tourism47
RESOURCE-BASED TOURISM
  • Rural communities have attractive natural resources and amenities.
  • Opportunities exist for a variety of tourism related businesses.
  • Dollars spent by visitors can help diversify local economies.
economic impact
ECONOMIC IMPACT
  • Potential for economic development, both from resource development and resource-based tourism
    • Creation of numerous jobs and incomes
    • Additional tax revenues generated
resource based tourism market
RESOURCE-BASED TOURISM MARKET
  • Effective marketing is essential to managing and promoting quality tourism development.
  • Marketing the Tourism Product
    • Identification
    • Positioning
    • Targeting
    • Maximizing utilization of capacity
utah s tourism product
UTAH’S TOURISM PRODUCT
  • Natural Amenities and …
    • Western Experience & Values
    • Pioneer & Ranching Heritage
    • Mormon Heritage
    • Native American Heritage
    • Wildlife & Wildlands
    • Landscape Diversity
    • “World Class Alpine & Redrock”
utah s tourism product51
UTAH’S TOURISM PRODUCT
  • The people of Utah...
        • friendly
        • neighborly
        • caring
        • strong family values
        • diverse
product development and marketing
PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT AND MARKETING
  • To maximize potential economic impact, communities need to develop products and marketing strategies based on knowledge of different market segments.
who do you want to attract
WHO DO YOU WANT TO ATTRACT?
  • Visitors spending maximum time and money
  • In-State, National, International Draw
  • Visitors sensitive to local values and viewpoints as socially responsible tourists
changes in visitor attitudes
CHANGES IN VISITOR ATTITUDES
  • Better Informed
  • Higher Expectations
  • Want Convenience
  • Demand Value
  • Expect Quality
what do your visitors want
WHAT DO YOUR VISITORS WANT?
  • Visitors want quality goods and services, and are willing to pay.
  • Visitors want opportunities to experience variety and develop a sense of place.
  • Visitors want a “package” of opportunities, experiences, activities.
opportunities and challenges
OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES
  • Different sectors will collide and create new forms of and challenges for tourism.
  • People in southern/rural Utah don’t like tourism!
  • Ambivalent/Negative local reaction to an “invasion of tourists”
opportunities and challenges57
OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES
  • Bad News--difficult transformation!
    • changing demography
    • infusion of outside capital
    • need for hospitality services
    • a permanent service mode
    • social and environmental impact from all these visitors
opportunities and challenges58
OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES
  • With tourism development, change is going to happen!
  • Challenge:

How to turn this change to your advantage… locally, regionally, statewide.

opportunities and challenges59
OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES
  • Can Utah’s communities handle more tourism?
  • Yes, but depends on what people want…

...a question of values.

opportunities and challenges60
OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES
  • Growth --more of the same...

versus

  • Development --quality growth...
opportunities and challenges61
OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES
  • Need to educate Utah’s citizens about the importance of tourism.
  • Need to demonstrate opportunity in outdoor recreation and tourism.
opportunities and challenges62
OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES
  • Entrepreneurial spirit--involves risk
    • Neo-natives who are entrepreneurs
    • Rural youth and the future
opportunities and challenges63
OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES
  • Key element is local hospitality at a high level.
  • Need to sensitize visitors to viewpoints of local residents.
  • Need to base decision-making on what is real.
opportunities and challenges64
OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES
  • Tourism can be part of the “economic mix” without poisoning it.
  • Maintain tourism at an appropriate scale; an appropriate part of overall economic activity.
opportunities and challenges65
OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES
  • Focus on development of “compatible, dispersed tourist businesses” that help vitalize the local economy.
for the future
FOR THE FUTURE
  • Must continue to nourish a healthy economy for future generations.
  • For sustainability, must strive to achieve and maintain balance.
  • Must do things smarter in order to provide this balance.
  • Better technology, better tools, and better information!
for the future67
FOR THE FUTURE
  • Means partnerships-- working together at all levels.
    • energy and time heavy, but very worthwhile and rewarding
    • total consensus is not always possible
  • Must have the courage to do what’s right, despite opposition.
for the future68
FOR THE FUTURE
  • Throughout Utah, need to work with future generations to enhance their knowledge and skills for opportunities in the future.
institute for outdoor recreation and tourism69
Institute for Outdoor Recreation and Tourism

Dr. Steve Burr

Associate Professor of Recreation Resources

Extension Specialist in Outdoor Recreation and Tourism

Director, Institute for Outdoor Recreation and Tourism

Institute for Outdoor Recreation and Tourism

Utah State University

5215 Old Main Hill

Logan, Utah 84322-5215

Office: (435) 797-7094

FAX: (435) 797-4040

E-mail: swburr@cc.usu.edu

IORT Website under Interdisciplinary Programs at www.cnr.usu.edu