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“Tintern Abbey”. p. 235. Nature Poetry of Romantic Period. Treats rustic/natural subject matter with high seriousness Antithetical to Enlightenment emphasis on human civilization Rooted in 17 th and 18 th century art, landscaping, and tourism. Landscape Painting. Landscaping and Gardening.

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nature poetry of romantic period
Nature Poetry of Romantic Period
  • Treats rustic/natural subject matter with high seriousness
  • Antithetical to Enlightenment emphasis on human civilization
  • Rooted in 17th and 18th century art, landscaping, and tourism
romantic aesthetics
Romantic Aesthetics

The “Beautiful” and the “Sublime”

  • Beautiful
    • Calm, soothing, pleasant, secure
  • Sublime
    • Awe-inspiring, mysterious, terrible, infinite/eternal
tintern abbey1
“Tintern Abbey”

The Beautiful and the Sublime

what features of the natural landscape does the speaker describe
What features of the natural landscape does the speaker describe?
  • “Beautiful” features
    • Line 4— “soft inland murmur”
    • Line 8— “quiet of the sky”
what features of the natural landscape does the speaker describe1
What features of the natural landscape does the speaker describe?
  • “Beautiful” features
    • Lines 10-14— speaker “reposes” in an orchard on “cottage plots”
    • Line 16— “pastoralfarms”
what features of the natural landscape does the speaker describe2
What features of the natural landscape does the speaker describe?
  • “Sublime” features
    • Line 3—“rolling from their mountain springs”
    • Lines 5-8— “steep and lofty cliffs” of the “wild secluded scene”
what features of the natural landscape does the speaker describe3
What features of the natural landscape does the speaker describe?
  • “Sublime” features
    • Line 14— orchard trees “lose themselves ’Mid groves and copses”
    • Line 16— hedgerows are “sportive” and “run wild”
what features of the natural landscape does the speaker describe4
What features of the natural landscape does the speaker describe?
  • “Sublime” features
    • Line 17— “wreaths of smoke . . . among the trees”
who is the speaker of the poem
Who is the speaker of the poem?
  • Persona who narrates the poem
  • Wordsworth himself
  • Meditates on personal experience as tourist
  • Examines emotional impact of memories of Tintern Abbey
how did memories of nature affect the speaker
How did memories of nature affect the speaker?
  • “Beautiful” effects
    • Lines 22-30—Provided emotional comfort and tranquility
    • Antidote to the “din” of urban settings
how did memories of nature affect the speaker1
How did memories of nature affect the speaker?
  • “Beautiful” effects
    • Lines 30-35—Built moral character
    • Inspired “acts of kindness and of love”
how did memories of nature affect the speaker2
How did memories of nature affect the speaker?
  • “Sublime” effects
    • Lines 35-45—Gave insight into spiritual meaning of life
    • We “become a living soul” and “see into the life of things”
what is the speaker s transformation
What is the speaker’s transformation?
  • Lines 58-93—Speaker traces transformation
    • “Boyish days”—thoughtless enjoyment of nature
    • Maturity—recognizes nature’s moral and spiritual power
who is the speaker s companion
Who is the speaker’s companion?
  • Lines 114-115—Speaker addresses companion
    • His “dearest friend”
    • His younger sister, Dorothy Wordsworth
what does the speaker see in his companion s response to nature
What does the speaker see in his companion’s response to nature?
  • Lines 116-121—Speaker analyzes companion’s response
    • Image of his former youthful self
    • Future repetition of his relationship to nature
what does the speaker see in his companion s response to nature1
What does the speaker see in his companion’s response to nature?
  • Lines 121-conclusion—Speaker predicts companion’s future relationship to nature
    • Memories of nature will sustain her in times of trouble
what is the relationship of humanity to nature
What is the relationship of humanity to nature?
  • Humanity’s perception of nature provides
    • Comfort
    • Moral guidance
    • Spiritual insight