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Interactive Metronome ® Pediatric Specialist Coaching Module 1: Overview and Foundations. By Mary Jones, OTR/L, DipCOT Sensational Kids, LLC Brain Focus International, Inc. Program Outline. Module 1: Pediatric Overview and Foundations Module 2: Modifying IM to Pediatric Populations

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interactive metronome pediatric specialist coaching module 1 overview and foundations

Interactive Metronome®Pediatric Specialist CoachingModule 1: Overview and Foundations

By Mary Jones, OTR/L, DipCOT

Sensational Kids, LLC

Brain Focus International, Inc.

program outline
Program Outline
  • Module 1: Pediatric Overview and Foundations
  • Module 2: Modifying IM to Pediatric Populations
  • Module 3: Motivational Strategies
  • Module 4: Teaching Auditory Association Skills
  • Module 5: Building relationships – Allowing control, switch choices and access.
  • Module 6: Interpreting Data
  • Module 7: Setting up Individualized Pediatric Treatment Plans with IM: Case Examples.
  • Module 8: Special Considerations – IM training plans with infant-toddlers or clients with decreased cognitive capabilities.
  • Module 9: Use of IM Systems in Group and Social Settings
  • Module 10: Moving Forward – Incorporating IM-Home into your pediatric best practices.
outcome goals for module 1
Outcome Goals for Module 1
  • Developing the art of ‘thinking outside the box’ with IM
  • Overview of IM use within the diversity of pediatrics
  • Getting started – Setting up of equipment/ environments
  • The Key to IM success – Learning to Modify!
  • Positioning that can be used with IM – Review of Examples
  • Review of Module 1 Learning Outcomes.
thinking outside of the box
Thinking ‘outside of the box’
  • Use of professional judgment and creativity to modify IM programming – we are a diverse group!
  • Developing the flexibility skills to effectively utilize IM as a treatment/training tool
  • Becoming comfortable thinking ‘outside of the box’
  • Taking the principles of the Interactive Metronome® System and consider them for all aspects of pediatric services and performance programs.
why im in peds
Why IM in Peds?
  • Timing is critical for the discrimination of sensory stimuli (Shannon et al., 1995; Buonomano and Karmarkar, 2002; Ivry and Spencer, 2004; Buhusi and Meck, 2005)
  • Timing is critical for the generation of coordinated motor responses (Mauk and Ruiz, 1992; Ivry, 1996; Meegan et al., 2000; Medina et al., 2005).
  • The nervous system processes temporal information over a wide range, from microseconds to circadian rhythms (Carr, 1993; Mauk and Buonomano, 2004; Buhusi and Meck, 2005).
applying im to the diversity of pediatrics
Applying IM to the diversity of Pediatrics
  • Educational
  • Therapeutic
  • Peak Performance
  • Recreational
  • Extra-curricular
  • Lifestyle
  • Wellness
educational
Educational
  • Low Self Esteem
  • Struggling with academics
  • Anxiety
  • Reactive
  • Poor motor planning
  • Difficulty finding their own ‘Rhythm’ or ‘Still point’
  • Eager to please
  • Difficulty ‘tuning in’
  • Difficulty keeping track of time
  • Survival reactions
  • Chronic adrenal stress
  • Disorganized
  • Clumsy
  • Difficulty ‘connecting the dots’
  • Poor listening skills
  • ‘Quick to quit’
therapeutic
Therapeutic
  • Attention Deficit Disorder (314.0; 314.01)
  • Asperger’s Syndrome (299.0)
  • Ataxia (438.84; 334.3; 331.89)
  • Autism (299.0)
  • Developmental Delays (315.9)
  • Dyspraxia (315.4)
  • Dyslexia (315.02)
  • Lack of Coordination (781.3)
  • Speech and Language delays (315.3)
  • Auditory Processing Disorders (388.45; 315.32)
  • Unspecified Disorders of the Central Nervous System (349.9)
  • Hemiplegia (342; 343.1)
  • Pervasive Developmental Delay (299.9)
  • Developmental Coordination Disorder (315.4)
  • Abnormal Posture (781.92)
  • Loss of Limb (755.4)
  • Abnormality of Gait (781.2)
  • Difficulty in Walking (719.7)
  • Orthotic Training (V57.41)
  • Feeding Difficulties (783.3; 307.59; 779.3; 783.41)
  • Dysphagia (787.42)
  • Articulation (315.39; 524.27)
  • Muscle Weakness (728.87; 780.79)
  • Tourette’s Disorder (307.23; 333.3)
  • Anxiety (300.0)
peak performance
Peak Performance
  • Speed -  focuses on developing starting speed and maximizing top end speed. Utilization of plyometrics and speed training techniques to maximize performance.
  • Agility – focuses on developing coordination, foot speed, reactive ability, and quickness. Utilization of sport specific movement pattern drills, plyometrics, and various mobility training equipment.
  • Conditioning – focuses on developing sport specific fitness by combining creative training methods with traditional conditioning equipment.
  • Strength – focuses on teaching proper resistance training techniques for a variety of sport specific exercises with emphasis on core.
recreational
Recreational
  • Effective use of free time
  • Personal development of ‘self’
  • Socially acceptable activities
  • PLAY!
  • Keeping up with peers
  • Ability to engage, socialize, plan, follow-through
lifestyle
Lifestyle
  • Choices
  • Opportunities
  • Exposure
  • Tolerance
extra curricular
Extra-Curricular
  • Sports
  • Drama
  • Music
  • Voice
  • Dance
  • Clubs
  • Societies
  • Cultural
wellness
Wellness
  • Mental Endurance
  • Mental Attitude
  • Stress Management
  • Focused Attention
  • Sleep
the key to im success
The Key to IM Success:
  • Modify for Engagement!
  • Be Spontaneous for Novelty!
  • Increase Repetition for

Synaptic Growth!

techniques for success
Techniques for success
  • Positioning alternatives
  • Physical Environment
  • Sensory Environment
  • Motivation Strategies
  • Tempo/Timing variance
  • Feedback Strategies
  • Interpreting Data
  • Pacing of activities and themes
  • Duration of tasks and sessions
  • Building Relationships – allowing control
  • Switch choices and Access
positioning upright stance
Positioning: Upright Stance

UPRIGHT STANCE: Extensor tone; balance; visual orientation; praxis.

  • Modify with variance of surface/texture/height/size of base/footwear.
half kneeling
Half Kneeling

HALF KNEELING

  • Core strengthening
  • Pelvic segmentation
  • Upper body/lower body integration
  • Proprioceptive body-in-space awareness
  • Reflex integration
  • Bilateral integration (praxis)

MODIFY:

  • Surfaces/textures/heights/stability/alternate knees
modify base of support
Modify Base of Support
  • Alter points of stability and mobility
  • Upper extremities: Clap High-Clap Low
  • Adapt lower extremity movement sequence
  • Side step and clap on the beat
  • Match tempo of music piece or sing to the beat
round sitting
Round Sitting

ROUND SITTING:

  • Pelvic and shoulder girdle alignment
  • Posture and positional awareness (grounded)
  • Upper body strengthening
  • Pelvic shift and core balance
  • Diaphragmatic breathing
dynamic postures
Dynamic Postures

DYNAMIC POSTURES:

  • Proprioceptive awareness
  • Core stability and shift
  • Visual orientation
  • Strengthening
  • Praxis

EXAMPLES:

  • Ball sit
  • Stool sit
  • Bench sit
  • Bolster sit (astride)
  • Cube sit
  • Rocking chair
supine lying down
Supine/Lying Down

SUPINE TIME:

  • Facilitates proprioceptive awareness (firm surface)
  • Decreases demands on motor planning
  • Work up against gravity
  • Reflex integration: Supine flexion
prone tummy time
Prone/Tummy Time

Modifications:

  • Floor (good for sensory feedback
  • Floor mat/different textures
  • Inverted/under/over

PRONE/TUMMY TIME:

  • Strengthening shoulder girdle
  • Hip flexor stretch
  • Facilitate co-contraction to flexor/extensor core stability
  • Visual-motor integration
  • Reflex integration
review of module 1 learning objectives
Review of Module 1 Learning Objectives
  • IM is used as a training tool across multiple domains and disciplines within pediatrics.
  • Professional judgment and creativity are required to provide optimum outcomes in pediatric IM programs.
  • Modification is key to provide

a customized approach to

each individual.

  • Pediatrics is diverse – so too is

the application of IM to

this population!

module 1 homework
Module 1 Homework
  • Complete Module 1 Post-Test
  • Complete Module 1 Worksheet
  • Review ready reference/resource sheet for Module 1
references
References
  • Boyle CA, Boulet S, Schieve L, Cohen RA, Blumberg SJ, Yeargin-Allsopp M, Visser S, Kogan MD. Trends in the Prevalence of Developmental Disabilities in US Children, 1997–2008. Pediatrics. 2011
  • Buhusi, C.V., and Meck, W.H. (2005). What makes us tick? Functional and neural mechanisms of interval timing. Nat. Rev. Neurosci. 6, 755–765.
  • Buonomano, D.V., and Karmarkar, U.R. (2002). How do we tell time? Neuroscientist 8, 42–51
  • Carr, C.E. (1993). Processing of temporal information in the brain.Annu. Rev. Neurosci. 16, 223–243.
references 2
References 2
  • Ivry, R. (1996). The representation of temporal information in perception and motor control. Curr. Opin. Neurobiol. 6, 851–857
  • Ivry, R.B., and Spencer, R.M.C. (2004). The neural representation of time. Curr. Opin. Neurobiol. 14, 225–232
  • Mauk, M.D., and Buonomano, D.V. (2004). The neural basis of temporal processing. Annu. Rev. Neurosci. 27, 304–340
  • Mauk, M.D., and Ruiz, B.P. (1992). Learning-dependent timing of Pavlovian eyelid responses: differential conditioning using multiple interstimulus intervals. Behav. Neurosci. 106, 666–681
references 3
References 3
  • Medina, J.F., Carey, M.R., and Lisberger, S.G. (2005). The representation of time for motor learning. Neuron 45, 157–167.
  • Meegan, D.V., Aslin, R.N., and Jacobs, R.A. (2000). Motor timinglearned without motor training. Nat. Neurosci. 3, 860–862.
  • Shannon, R.V., Zeng, F.G., Kamath, V., Wygonski, J., and Ekelid, M. (1995). Speech recognition with primarily temporal cues. Science 270, 303–304.
useful resources
Useful Resources

Sensory Processing Disorder:

  • www.spdfoundation.net
  • www.sensory-processing-disorder.com
  • www.sensorysmarts.com
  • www.spdsupport.org

Dyspraxia:

  • www.dyspraxiausa.org
  • www.dyspraxia.info
  • www.alifewithdyspraxia.webs.com

Autism:

  • www.autismspeaks.org
  • www.aspergersyndrome.org
  • www.autismspot.org
recommended webinars
Recommended Webinars
  • Introduction to IM Pediatric Best Practices - Self-Study