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2013 Teaching and Learning Support Institute Alaska English/Language Arts. Karen Melin Alaska Department of Education & Early Development Administrator of Instructional Support 907-465-6536 karen.melin@alaska.gov. Poll. http://www.polleverywhere.com/multiple_choice_polls/Cqc3493nPeLsDlN.

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2013 Teaching and Learning Support Institute Alaska English/Language Arts


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2013 teaching and learning support institute alaska english language arts

2013 Teaching and Learning Support Institute Alaska English/Language Arts

Karen Melin

Alaska Department of Education & Early Development

Administrator of Instructional Support

907-465-6536

karen.melin@alaska.gov

slide2
Poll

http://www.polleverywhere.com/multiple_choice_polls/Cqc3493nPeLsDlN

goals for this session
Goals For This Session
  • Gain a greater cognitive understand the key shifts in the Alaska English Language Arts
  • Instructional strategies for implementation of the Alaska ELA standards
foundational skills1
Foundational Skills
  • Print Concepts (K – 1)
  • Phonological Awareness (K – 1)
  • Phonics and Word Recognition (K – 5)
  • Fluency (K – 5)
slide7

General Shifts in Instruction

Building knowledge through content-rich nonfiction and information texts in addition to literature

2. Reading and writing grounded in evidence from the text

3. Regular practice with complex text and its academic vocabulary

what does the mean
What does the mean?
  • For reading, students must grasp information, arguments, ideas and details based on careful attention to the text.
  • For writing, students must write to present analyses, well-defended claims, and clear thoughts using textual evidence.
  • Teachers become masterful at using text-dependent questions to help students achieve these objectives.
what does that mean
What does that mean?
  • All student have the opportunity to practice reading complex text
  • Text is strategically chosen to help students become confident when confronted with text that is complex in structure, vocabulary, and/or density of information. Doesnot have to be non fiction to be complex.
  • An emphasis on building content vocabulary as well as academic vocabulary (words found commonly in academic settings like: analysis, assessment, establish, identify, and determine)
what make one more complex than the other
What make one more complex than the other?

mountains

Verplanck Colvin was born in 1847 in Albany, New York. From an early age, Colvin showed an interest in science and nature and loved hiking in the hills.

When he was 18, Colvin read Woods and Water, a book by a local man, Alfred Billings Street, about his adventures in the Adirondack Mountains. Street described fishing in mountain lakes, traveling down fast-moving rivers, and camping in pine forests. These tales captured Colvin’s imagination, and he set out to explore the Adirondacks.

river

Verplanck Colvin was born in 1847 in Albany, New York. He became interested in nature when he was a boy. He loved to hike in the hills near his home.

When Colvin was 18, he read a book about Adirondack Mountains. He was very excited to read about lakes, rivers, and forests. So he decided to explore the Adirondacks.

Gill, M. (2012). Save this space. New York: The McGraw-Hill Company.

complex text scaffolding
Complex TextScaffolding…

There are many ways to scaffold student learning in complex text:

  • Multiple reads using annotation
  • Read Aloud
  • Chunking text (a little at a time)
  • Provide support while reading, rather than before
academic vocabulary
Academic Vocabulary?
  • Content Vocabulary
  • Carnivore
  • Erosion
  • Refraction
  • Tariff
  • Migration
  • Region
  • Academic Vocabulary
  • Organized
  • Analysis
  • Compare
  • Contrast
  • Outline
  • Synthesis
explicit instruction on t ext s tructures
Explicit Instruction on text structures

Informational

Narrative

Cause/Effect

Character(s)

Compare/Contrast

Setting

Problem/Conflict

Description

Events

Chronology/Sequence

Resolution/Outcomes

Problem/Solution

Theme

close reading
Close Reading
  • Close reading is meant to be completed using short texts at grade level.
  • Close reading is meant to be completed over several repeated readings extended over several teaching periods.
  • Close reading is meant to be a collaborative process amongst peers and facilitated by an educator
v ocabulary
Vocabulary
  • Better understanding of complex words
  • Promotes critical thinking
  • Draws on prior knowledge to build new connections
  • Accommodates different learning styles
  • What the word is
  • What the word is not
  • Visual reference
activity vocabulary
Activity: Vocabulary
  • Survival Words
    • Choose several unfamiliar words from the text.
    • Have students copy the chart.
    • Students write the meaning of the words they know.
    • Work in groups to share words that they are most confident about.
    • Review charts with the entire class and help them clarify words which they still have difficulty.
progression of text dependent questions with bloom s taxonomy
Progression of Text Dependent Questions with Bloom’s Taxonomy

Synthesis

Evaluate

Analysis

Application

Comprehension

Knowledge

text dependent questions
Text Dependent Questions
  • Can only be answered with evidence from the text.
  • Can be literal and will involve higher level thinking skills (analysis, synthesis and evaluation).
  • Focus on vocabulary, sentence and paragraph, in addition to larger ideas, themes or events.
  • Focus on the challenging sections of the passage.
  • Include prompts for writing and discussion.

Three types of questions

  • Assess theme and central ideas
  • Assess knowledge of vocabulary
  • Assess syntax and structure
your turn
Your turn
  • Develop three text dependent questions that focus on the following areas:
  • Theme and Central Ideas
  • Knowledge and Vocabulary
  • Syntax and Structure
text dependent questions1
Text Dependent Questions
  • Theme and Central Ideas

What evidence supports varied climate as a possible cause for double-layered craters on Mars?

  • Knowledge and Vocabulary

Impact (verb) means to strike forcefully. An impactor (noun) is something that strikes something else forcefully. What happened on Mars when its surface was struck by an impactor?

  • Syntax and Structure

An appositive is a noun or pronoun which adds extra information to clarify a noun in the sentence. Watching for the commas that surround the appositive, determine what James W. Head does at the University.

goals for this session1
Goals For This Session
  • Gain a greater cognitive understand the key shifts in the Alaska English Language Arts
  • Instructional strategies for implementation of the Alaska ELA standards
contact me
Contact Me!

Karen Melin, Administrator of Instructional Support

karen.melin@alaska.gov, 907-465-6536