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Abstract. Participants. NCATE Design Principles . Findings. Conclusions. References. Methods. eSupervision and the Role of the Supervisor. Marva Cappello , Ph.D. and Karen Elizabeth Lafferty, San Diego State University.

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slide1

Abstract

Participants

NCATE Design Principles

Findings

Conclusions

References

Methods

eSupervision and the Role of the Supervisor

MarvaCappello, Ph.D. and Karen Elizabeth Lafferty, San Diego State University

The Blue Ribbon Panel on Clinical Preparation and Partnerships for Improved Student Learning’s main recommendation to The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) was to make clinical practice central to teacher preparation. Although the report cites many successful ventures, it calls for a systematic overhaul that goes beyond isolated pilot programs. eSupervision (Alger & Kopcha, 2009, 2011) is an online, interactive program that “re-imagines the field experience” (2009, p.33), addresses many of the weaknesses of the traditional clinical model, and may be a useful tool for redesigning clinical teacher preparation models. In this study, we focus on the ways eSupervision supports the NCATE Blue Ribbon Report recommendations and enhances the roles of the university supervisor to benefit all triad members.

The participants in this research included the 48 supervisors who attended the fall 2010 training workshop at San Diego State University. The participating supervisors supported candidates in K-12 classrooms all over San Diego County. These supervisors came to the workshop with varying range of supervisory experiences. They also brought background experiences as classroom teachers, administrators, and full time university faculty members. The supervisors also brought varying experiences working with eSupervision: a few were using it for the third academic year and others were reflecting on their first semester experiences.

#3 A candidate’s progress and the elements of a preparation program are continuously judged on the basis of data.

The private forum component of eSupervision is a repository of data on the student teacher’s progress and includes face-to-face observation notes, midterm and final evaluations, sample lesson plans, and reflection and dialogue by the triad members. In addition, there is a running public forum that captures reflections and dialogue among all members of the learning community.

“It made it simple to find important forms. It also provided the triad a place to discuss any important matters.”

“I don't think that e-supervision can ever substitute for the one-on-one intensive & explicit feedback sessions that I always have with my STs, but it does help us keep track of their paperwork & allows us to see growth over the semester.”

1 Student learning is the focus

2 Clinical preparation is integrated throughout every facet of teacher education in a dynamic way.

3 A candidate’s progress and the elements of a preparation program are continuously judged on the basis of data.

4 Programs prepare teachers who are expert in content and how to teach it and are also innovators, collaborators and problem solvers.

5 Candidates learn in an interactive professional community.

6 Clinical educators and coaches are rigorously selected and prepared and drawn from both higher education and the P-12 sector.

7 Specific sites are designated and funded to support embedded clinical preparation.

8 Technology applications foster high-impact preparation. State of the art technologies should be employed by preparation programs to promote enhanced productivity, greater efficiencies, and collaboration through learning communities.

9 A powerful R&D agenda and systematic gathering and use of data support continuous improvement in teacher preparation.

10 Strategic partnerships are imperative for powerful clinical preparation.

Learning modules focus the student teacher and supervisor on techniques for gathering student data and on techniques for analysis.

eSupervision’s instructional modules on planning, assessment, classroom management, understanding the teaching context, and reflection are integrated in various courses throughout the teacher preparation program.

The private forum component of eSupervision is a repository of data on the student teacher’s progress and includes face-to-face observation notes, midterm and final evaluations, sample lesson plans, and reflection and dialogue by the triad members.

The discussion board and the assignments in the modules support and encourage collaboration in terms of teaching and learning.

Based on a cognitive apprenticeship model, eSupervision provides the platform for developing community. There are multiple avenues for feedback from all members of the community including the guide teachers, other student teachers, university supervisors, and team leaders.

eSupervision supports the cohort model for teacher preparation. Cohorts are organized around PDSs and district initiatives.

This technology-based innovation was created from the need for improved quality student teaching field experiences. Designed within a cognitive apprenticeship framework, eSupervision includes modeling and scaffolding to gradually release responsibility to the student teacher in the field through continuous access to expert thinking within the learning community.

eSupervision provides a powerful platform for R and D. Combined with PACT data, artifacts that represent growth over time, and interviews, we are gathering a rich description of the clinical practice for all three triad members. In addition, because the model is scalable, we can engage in continuous improvement of our program.

eSupervision helps to better define and enact roles for all participants.

#5 Candidates learn in an interactive professional community.

Based on a cognitive apprenticeship model, eSupervision provides the platform for developing community. There are multiple avenues for feedback from all members of the community including the guide teachers, other student teachers, university supervisors, and team leaders.

“It was nice to be part of the guide teacher and student teacher conversations on a regular basis.”

“Before observations I was able to review lesson plans.”

“It was wonderful to be able to see communication with everyone involved.

It kept the lines of communication open.”

#8 Technology applications foster high-impact preparation.

This technology-based innovation was created from the need for improved quality student teaching field experiences. eSupervision includes modeling and scaffolding to gradually release responsibility to the student teacher in the field through continuous access to expert thinking within the learning community. Indeed, eSupervision is built around opportunities for supervisors and cooperating teachers (experts) to make their thinking apparent to the novice student teacher.

“Last semester, I had limited time to go to my classroom to observe, so we decided to do a combination of observations and recorded lessons.” “Twice I videotaped myself teaching, then sent the lesson to [the supervisor] via eSupervision. This allowed me to receive the same amount of feedback, yet was much more convenient for our busy schedules! I have really enjoyed working with this program, and have found it to be a very useful tool within the credential program.”

Alger, C., & Kopcha, T. J. (2009). eSupervision: A Technology Framework for the 21st Century Field Experience in Teacher Education. Issues in Teacher Education. 18(2), 31-46.

Alger, C., & Kopcha, T. J. (2011). Technology Supported Cognitive Apprenticeship Transforms the Student Teaching Field Experience: Improving the Student Teaching Field Experience for All Triad Members. Teacher Educator. 46(1), 71-88.

Bullough, R. V., & Draper, R. J. (2004). Making sense of the failed triad. Journal of Teacher Education, 55(5), 407-420.

Collins, A., Brown, J., & Holum, A., (1991). Cognitive apprenticeship: Making thinking visible. American Educator, 6(11), 38-46.

Cornu, R.L. & Ewing, R. (2008). Reconceptualising professional experiences in pre-service teacher education…reconstructing the past to embrace the future. Teaching and Teacher Education, 24(7), 1799-1812.

Feiman-Nemser, S. (2001). From preparation to practice: Designing a continuum to strengthen and sustain t eaching. Teachers College Record, 103(6), 1013-1055.

National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education, (2010). Report of the Blue Ribbon Panel on clinical preparation and partnerships for improved student learning. Washington D.C.: NCATE Publications

Slick, S. K. (1998). The university supervison: A disenfranchised outsider. Teaching and Teacher Education, 14(8), 821-834.

Simpson, M. (2006). Field Experiences in distance delivered initial teacher education programmes. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 14(2) 241-254.

Wilson, E.K. (2006). The impact of an alternative model of student teacher supervision: Views of the participants. Teaching and Teacher Education, 22, 22-31.

Zeichner, K. (2002). Beyond Traditional Structures of Student Teaching. Teacher Education Quarterly. 29(2), 59-64.

eSupervision represents a major change in how we conduct and supervise the clinical field experience. It is a technology-based innovation that answers the Blue Ribbon Panel on Clinical Preparation and Partnerships for Improved Student Learning’s main recommendation to make clinical practice central to teacher preparation. eSupervision also addresses several weaknesses identified in traditional supervision models including undefined participant roles and struggles with communication among participants.