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Digital Divide - Tremendous Challenge for Globalization 20 Years after Maitland Report. Jaroslaw K. Ponder Strategy and Policy Unit International Telecommunication Union.

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digital divide tremendous challenge for globalization 20 years after maitland report

Digital Divide - Tremendous Challenge for Globalization20 Years after Maitland Report

Jaroslaw K. Ponder

Strategy and Policy Unit

International Telecommunication Union

Presentation prepared for lecture at CBKE - The Research Centre for Legal and Economic Issues of Electronic Communication

6 March 2006, Wroclaw, Poland

Note: The views expressed in this presentation are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the ITU. Jaroslaw K. Ponder can be contacted at Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

agenda
Agenda
  • Globalization and the ICTs
  • Origins of Digital Divide
  • Need for Global Action
  • The World Summit on the Information Society
  • Implications for Central and Eastern European Countries

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

globalization and the icts
Globalization and the ICTs

We all build the global knowledge-based information society!

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

globalization and the icts4
Globalization and the ICTs
  • Globalization, internationalization…
    • Economic phenomenon, involving the increasing interaction, or integration, of national economic systems through the growth in international trade, investment and capital flows.
    • Rapid increase in cross-border social, cultural and technological exchange as part of the phenomenon of globalisation
  • Meaning of ICTs for globalization…
    • Meaning of the information
    • Speed of dissemination
    • Network externalities

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

globalization and the icts5
Globalization and the ICTs
  • Missing link (1985)
    • The Independent Commission for Worldwide Telecommunications Development published "The Maitland Report" that
      • Underlined the meaning of the communication technologies for the socio-economic development
      • Emphasized the fact that the digital divide is growing
      • Pledges for action
  • ITU World Development Reports (1995)
  • WSIS Follow-up (2005)

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

fixed telecommunications per 100 inhabitants 1984
Fixed Telecommunications Per 100 Inhabitants - 1984

 Less than 3.0

3.0 – 12.1

12.1 – 23.1

23.1 – 43.1

43.2 – more

No data

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

Source: ITU World Telecommunication Indicators Database

fixed telecommunications per 100 inhabitants 1994
Fixed Telecommunications Per 100 Inhabitants - 1994

 Less than 3.0

3.0 – 12.1

12.1 – 23.1

23.1 – 43.1

43.2 – more

No data

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

Source: ITU World Telecommunication Indicators Database

fixed telecommunications per 100 inhabitants 2003
Fixed Telecommunications Per 100 Inhabitants - 2003

 Less than 3.0

3.0 – 12.1

12.1 – 23.1

23.1 – 43.1

43.2 – more

No data

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

Source: ITU World Telecommunication Indicators Database

progress in teledensity in 1992 and 2002
Progress in Teledensity in 1992 and 2002

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

Source: ITU World Telecommunication Indicators Database

mobile telecommunications per 100 inhabitants 1984
Mobile Telecommunications Per 100 Inhabitants - 1984

 Less than 6.0

6.0 – 20.0

20.0 – 43.1

43.1 – 79.1

79.1 – more

No data

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

Source: ITU World Telecommunication Indicators Database

mobile telecommunications per 100 inhabitants 1994
Mobile Telecommunications Per 100 Inhabitants - 1994

 Less than 6.0

6.0 – 20.0

20.0 – 43.1

43.1 – 79.1

79.1 – more

No data

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

Source: ITU World Telecommunication Indicators Database

mobile telecommunications per 100 inhabitants 2001
Mobile Telecommunications Per 100 Inhabitants - 2001

 Less than 6.0

6.0 – 20.0

20.0 – 43.1

43.1 – 79.1

79.1 – more

No data

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

Source: ITU World Telecommunication Indicators Database

mobile telecommunications per 100 inhabitants 2002
Mobile Telecommunications Per 100 Inhabitants - 2002

 Less than 6.0

6.0 – 20.0

20.0 – 43.1

43.1 – 79.1

79.1 – more

No data

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

Source: ITU World Telecommunication Indicators Database

mobile telecommunications per 100 inhabitants 2003
Mobile Telecommunications Per 100 Inhabitants - 2003

 Less than 6.0

6.0 – 20.0

20.0 – 43.1

43.1 – 79.1

79.1 – more

No data

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

Source: ITU World Telecommunication Indicators Database

mobile telecommunications per 100 inhabitants 2004
Mobile Telecommunications Per 100 Inhabitants - 2004

 Less than 6.0

6.0 – 20.0

20.0 – 43.1

43.1 – 79.1

79.1 – more

No data

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

Source: ITU World Telecommunication Indicators Database

fixed and mobile telecommunications
Fixed and mobile telecommunications

Source: ITU World Telecommunication Indicators Database

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

internet users per 100 inhabitants 1994
Internet Users Per 100 Inhabitants - 1994

 Less than 1.5

1.5 – 5.3

5.3 – 13.2

13.2 – 34.8

34.8 – more

No data

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

Source: ITU World Telecommunication Indicators Database

internet users per 100 inhabitants 1998
Internet Users Per 100 Inhabitants - 1998

 Less than 1.5

1.5 – 5.3

5.3 – 13.2

13.2 – 34.8

34.8 – more

No data

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

Source: ITU World Telecommunication Indicators Database

internet users per 100 inhabitants 2001
Internet Users Per 100 Inhabitants - 2001

 Less than 1.5

1.5 – 5.3

5.3 – 13.2

13.2 – 34.8

34.8 – more

No data

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

Source: ITU World Telecommunication Indicators Database

internet users per 100 inhabitants 2004
Internet Users Per 100 Inhabitants - 2004

 Less than 1.5

1.5 – 5.3

5.3 – 13.2

13.2 – 34.8

34.8 – more

No data

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

Source: ITU World Telecommunication Indicators Database

pcs and internet
PCs and Internet

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

Source: ITU World Telecommunication Indicators Database

does digital divide exists
Does Digital Divide Exists?

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

Source: ITU World Telecommunication Indicators Database

need for global action
Need for Global Action

We all build the global knowledge-based information society!

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

ongoing changes in the telecommunication sector
Ongoing changes in the Telecommunication sector
  • Regulatory reform
    • Ex-monopolists: Restructurization, Privatization
    • Markets: Liberalization, Demonopolization, Competition
    • Institutional framework: Policy, Strategy, Regulation, Regulatory Harmonization
    • Internationalization: Mergers, Acquisitions
  • Since early 90s high innovation dynamics
    • Enhanced R&D spending
    • Increased number of patents
    • Growing spending on ICTs

Not everywhere!!!

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

ict sector innovation dynamics
ICT sector innovation dynamics
  • Fast growth of Internet users
  • Expansion of mobile telecommunications
  • Digitalization and IP migration in telecommunication sector
  • Changed requirements for the ICT infrastructure
    • Multimedia
    • Generalized mobility
    • Convergence
    • Integrity
    • Multi-layer orientation
    • Open character
  • Future regulatory environment…

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

global initiative wsis
World Summit on the Information Society

Proposed by Tunisia at ITU Plenipotentiary Conference, 1998

Endorsed as UN Summit in 2001 (UNGA Res 56/183)

Unique Summit

First Summit in two Phases

True Multi-Stakeholder Process

Numerous Parallel Events

Outcome Documents

Geneva Declaration of Principles

Geneva Plan of Action

Tunis Commitment

Tunis Agenda for the Information Society

Global Initiative: WSIS

www.wsis.org

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

two phases
Tunis November 2005

Summit of Solutions

19’401 participants, of which 47 Heads of State/Govt

6’241 representatives of from 606 civil societyorgs

4’816 business representatives from 226 organizations

92 international organizations

979 media representatives from 642 organizations

307 Parallel events from 264 organisers

GenevaDecember 2003

Agenda Setting Summit

11’000 participants, of which 41 Heads of State/Govt

3’310representatives of from 481 civil society orgs

514 business representatives from 98 organizations

87 international organizations

1’486 media representatives from 631 organizations

More than 300 Parallel events

Two Phases

www.wsis.org

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

wsis outcome
Geneva Declaration & Tunis Commitment

Shared vision and principles of overcoming the Digital Divide and achieving MDGs

Affirmed a unified approach to Cyber-security

Reiterated Stakeholders Commitment to freedom of expression online

Enabling environment (good governance, transparency and pro-competitive policy)

Encouraged development of localized content and multilingualism

Geneva Plan of Action & Tunis Agenda

Build an inclusive, development oriented Information Society

Set 11 Action Lines

Target of 2015

Set, benchmarks and evaluation processes

Financial Mechanisms

Internet Governance

Implementation and Follow-up

WSIS Outcome

www.wsis.org

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

financial mechanisms
Financial Mechanisms
  • Financial Mechanisms for meeting the Challenges of ICT for Development
    • Voluntary Digital Solidarity Fund
    • Adaptation, improvements & innovations in existing mechanismsto assist ICT for development
    • IXPsand Interconnectionissues
    • Development of domestic financial instruments
      • local microfinance instruments, ICT business incubators, public credit instruments, reverse auction mechanisms, networking initiatives based on local communities, digital solidarity
    • Mitigation of investment risksand transaction costs
    • Dept relief

www.wsis.org

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

internet governance
Internet Governance
  • Working definitionof Internet Governance
  • Creation of open, inclusive Internet Governance Forum
  • Recognized the need for enhanced cooperation
  • Nation’s Sovereignty regarding ccTLDs addressed
  • Recognized need for global approach on cyber-security and SPAM issues
  • More focus on e-business and e-government
  • Support for alternative software solutions

www.wsis.org

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

implementation follow up
Implementation Follow-up
  • Implementation process
    • National, regional and international
  • Multi-stakeholder character
  • Role of the partnerships
  • Information Society in numbers
    • Partnership on Measuring ICT for Development
    • ICT Opportunity Index
    • Digital Opportunity Index
  • The Golden Book
    • New commitments and initiatives
  • WSIS Stocktaking
    • WSIS-related implementation activities and projects
  • Connect the World

www.wsis.org

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

implementation follow up35
Implementation Follow-up
  • Para 90. We reaffirm our commitment to providing equitable access to information and knowledge for all, recognising the role of ICTs for economic growth and development (…)
    • mainstreaming and aligning national e-strategies…
    • developing and implementing enabling policies…
    • building ICT capacity…
    • implementing effective training and education…
    • paying special attention to the formulation of universal design conceptsand the use of assistive technologies…
    • promoting public policies aimed at providing affordable access at all levels…
    • improving access to the world's health knowledgeand telemedicine services …
    • building ICT capacities…
    • using ICTs to improve access to agricultural knowledge …
    • developing and implementing e-government applications…
    • supporting educational, scientific, and cultural institutions …
    • enhancing the capacity of communities …
    • strengthening the creation of quality e-content …
    • promoting the use of traditional and new media…
    • strongly encouraging ICT enterprises and entrepreneurs to develop and use environment-friendly production processes …
    • incorporating regulatory, self-regulatory, and other effective policies and frameworks to protect children and young people …
    • promoting the development of advanced research networks …
    • promoting the use of ICTs to enhance flexible ways of working …

www.wsis.org

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

implementation follow up36
Implementation Follow-up

National implementation

(Para 100)

Regional implementation

(Para 101)

International implementation

(Para 102)

102. At the international level, bearing in mind the importance of the enabling environment:

a) Implementation and follow-up of the outcomes of the Geneva and Tunis phases of the Summit should take into account the main themes and action lines in the Summit documents;

b) Each UN agency should act according to its mandate and competencies, and pursuant to decisions of their respective governing bodies, and within existing approved resources;

c) Implementation and follow-up should include intergovernmental and multi-stakeholder components.

www.wsis.org

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

Source: T. Kelly (2006)

implementation follow up37
Implementation Follow-up

National implementation

(Para 100)

Regional implementation

(Para 101)

International implementation

(Para 102)

Follow-up and review

(Paras 104, 105, 111)

Coordination amongUN agencies

(Para 103)

Multi-stakeholderImplementation

(Paras 108-110+ Annex)

www.wsis.org

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

Source: T. Kelly (2006)

implementation follow up38
Implementation Follow-up

National implementation

(Para 100)

Regional implementation

(Para 101)

International implementation

(Para 102)

Follow-up and review

(Paras 104, 105, 111)

Coordination amongUN agencies

(Para 103)

Multi-stakeholderImplementation

(Paras 108-110+ Annex)

Periodic evaluation, using an agreed methodology (Paras 113-120)

www.wsis.org

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

Source: T. Kelly (2006)

implementation follow up39
Implementation Follow-up

National implementation

(Para 100)

Regional implementation

(Para 101)

International implementation

(Para 102)

Follow-up and review

(Paras 104, 105, 111)

Coordination amongUN agencies

(Para 103)

Multi-stakeholderImplementation

(Paras 108-110+ Annex)

Focus on action line facilitation/moderation

Periodic evaluation, using an agreed methodology (Paras 113-120)

www.wsis.org

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

Source: T. Kelly (2006)

implementation follow up40
ImplementationFollow-up

Moderators/facilitators for the Action Lines

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

facilitation and moderation
Facilitation and Moderation
  • 24 February 2006
    • Moderators/Facilitators Consultation Meeting
  • 9 March 2006
    • Consultation on action line C2: Information and Communication Infrastructure
  • 15 May 2006
    • Consultation on action line C5: Building Confidence and Security in the use of ICTs

www.wsis.org

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

building digital bridges
Building Digital Bridges

Opportunity

Utilization

DOI

Infrastructure

Digital Opportunity Index

1/3

1/3

www.wsis.org

1/3

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

digital opportunity index
Digital Opportunity Index

percentage of population covered by mobilecellular telephony

internet usersper 100 inhabitants

ratio of broadband internet subscribers to internet subscribers

mobile cellular tariffsas a percentage of per capita income

DOI

ratio of broadband mobile subscribers to mobile internet subscribers

internet access tariffs as a percentage of per capita income

proportion of households with a computer

Proportion of households with fixed line telephone

mobile cellular subscribers per 100 inhabitants

mobile internet subscribers per 100 inhabitants

proportion of households with Internet accessat home

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

digital opportunity index44
Digital Opportunity Index

Leaders: Korea, Hong Kong and Japan

CEE: High opportunities but low utilization

Mobile component and broadband

Digital Opportunity Index

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

the golden book
The Golden Book
  • Origins
    • Swiss proposal during PrepCom-2 for a “stakeholder commitments paper”, later endorsed by Intergovernmental Bureau of PrepCom.
  • Content
    • Sample of commitmentsand new initiatives that has been anounced during the Tunis Phase of WSIS
  • On 31 January 2006
    • 378 commitments > 3.2 Billions Euro

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

the golden book46
The Golden Book

www.itu.int/wsis/goldenbook

>

378 commitments

€ 3.2 billion

Amount of financial commitments by stakeholder

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

selected large commitments governments
Selected large commitments Governments

www.itu.int/wsis/goldenbook

  • China: 'Cun Cun Tong' Project
    • Village Connected:The overall goal of this project is the realization of universal access to telephone service in the nearly 70,000 villages having no telephone coverage.
  • Ethiopia: Rural Connectivity Project
    • The government of Ethiopia has allocated a huge amount of resources from the national budget. As a result of the RCP more than 60 million Ethiopians will have access to telephone, Internet and television services.
  • Pan African E-Network Project
    • The network should connect all 53 countries of the African Union to provide effective communication and connectivity among these countries.

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

selected large commitments international and regional organisations
Selected large commitmentsInternational and Regional Organisations

www.itu.int/wsis/goldenbook

  • European Union: GEANT2
    • The European Union supports a broader policy to ensure the global reach of research and education networks. It includes also the launching of concrete initiatives to support developing regions in the world, in particular the Mediterranean rim, Latin America and Asia via the projects EUMEDconnect, ALICE and TEIN2, respectively.
  • UN Industrial Development Organisation
    • ICT support to Micro, Small and Medium Enterprises in developing countries
  • World Bank: Africa Regional Initiative
    • Regional Communications Infrastructure Program in East and Southern Africa is an investment and Technical Assistance (TA) project in support of the liberalization of telecommunication markets in Eastern and Southern African countries and the development of a modern fiber-optic backbone to connect these countries to each other and the rest of the world.

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

selected large commitments business sector entities
Selected large commitments Business Sector Entities

www.itu.int/wsis/goldenbook

  • CATEL: Rural Area Telecommunications Program
    • Using state-of-the-art CDMA 3G technology, CATEL plans to expand its network to rural areas in Azerbaijan, so that people across the Country can benefit from the access to ICT for development.
  • Microsoft: Telecentre.org
    • Canada’s IDRC, Microsoft Corp and the Swiss SDC announced the launch of telecentre.org, a CAN$21 million collaborative initiative that will strengthen the capacity of tens of thousands of community-based telecentres around the world.
  • Sentech: Digital Terrestrial Television Broadcasting in South Africa
    • Digitisation of the Television Broadcasting infrastructure will enable our systems to seamlessly carry broadcasting, data and voice content efficiently. Digital television broadcasting and, more specifically, digital terrestrial broadcasting, opens up many possibilities for providing universal access on a very broad basis.

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

selected large commitments civil society entities
Selected large commitments Civil Society Entities

www.itu.int/wsis/goldenbook

  • Village Phone Replication ManualGrameen Foundation USA
    • GFUSA is working to spread the successful Village Phone model throughout the developing world with the release of its Village Phone Replication Manual. The manual, which draws from the experiences of Village Phone in both Bangladesh and Uganda, provides a blueprint for bringing affordable, accessible telecommunications service to poor, rural areas through microfinance and for creating demand on infrastructure investment.
  • ICT for PoorMASTEL, Indonesia
    • Increasing Internet and telecommunications access for people in rural areas through telecenters, as well as keeping such telecenters self-sufficient.
  • Community CETEBI Telecenter Model Enlace Quiché, Guatemala
    • This new model builds on the successful School CETEBI model that began in 2000 and has been implemented in over 30 schools in rural Guatemala.

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

wsis stocktaking
WSIS Stocktaking

www.itu.int/wsis/stocktaking

  • Ongoing process
  • Collaborative database
  • Online questionnaire
  • More than 2’600 projects
  • Basis for future evaluation
  • Report on Stocktaking published at Tunis Summit

www.wsis.org

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

wsis stocktaking52
WSIS Stocktaking

www.itu.int/wsis/stocktaking

  • Tunis Agenda, paragraph 120
    • “The sharing of information related to the implementation of WSIS outcomes is an important element of evaluation. We note with appreciation the report on the Stocktaking of WSIS-related activities, which will serve as one of the valuable tools for assisting with the follow-up, beyond the conclusion of the Tunis Phase of the Summit, as well as the “Golden Book” of initiatives launched during the Tunis phase. We encourage all WSIS stakeholders to continue to contribute information on their activities to the public WSIS stocktaking database, maintained by ITU. In this regard, we invite all countries to gather information at the national level with the involvement of all stakeholders, to contribute to the stocktaking.”

www.wsis.org

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

wsis stocktaking future
WSIS Stocktaking:Future

www.itu.int/wsis/stocktaking

  • Tracking progress made in building the Information Society
  • Maintaining and improving the Internet-based Stocktaking Database
  • Encouraging all WSIS stakeholders to submit and update descriptions of projects
  • Establishing the necessary links to moderators/facilitators to share and exchange information efficiently

www.wsis.org

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

wsis stocktaking future54
WSIS Stocktaking:Future

www.itu.int/wsis/stocktaking

  • Raisingawareness of the content of the database among all WSIS stakeholders through greater information and publicity
  • Developing analytical tools and materials emphasizing countries’ experiences and best practices
  • Regular publication of future editions of the Stocktaking Reportto present the efforts of all stakeholders in WSIS implementation

www.wsis.org

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

connect the world
Connect the World is a global multi-stakeholder effort established within the context of the WSIS to encourage new projects and partnerships to bridge the digital divide.

By showcasing development efforts now underway and by identifying areas where needs are the most pressing, Connect the World will create a critical mass that will generate the momentum needed to “connect the unconnected by 2015.”

Connecting the unconnected by 2015...

Connect the World

www.itu.int/partners

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

implications for central and eastern european countries
Implications for Central and Eastern European Countries

We all build the global knowledge-based information society!

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

implications for the ceecs
Implications for the CEECs
  • ICTs enable globalization process
  • Digital Divide exists everywhere; This is not only the problem of poor countries
  • DD has particular meaning for transition economies and developing economies
  • It may have significant impact on integration process
  • Many CEE countries did significant progress in development of IS
  • Much more work has to be done in the future in order to connect the unconnected

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

implications for ceecs
Implications for CEECs
  • Regional coordination/facilitation of development of information society is very important
  • Global coordination will bring advantages, nevertheless this process needs involvement of all stakeholders
  • Further development of the Information Society requires promotion of multi-stakeholder approach
  • Multi-stakeholder partnerships are fundamental for sustainability of this on-going process

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

thank you very much for your attention
Thank you very much for your attention!

Jaroslaw K. Ponder

International Telecommunication Union

Strategy and Policy Unit

E-mail: Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

http://www.itu.int/spu

Tel: 00 41 22 730 60 65

We all build the global knowledge-based information society!

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

itu international telecommunications union
ITU - International Telecommunications Union

We all build the global knowledge-based information society!

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

itu international telecommunication union
ITU - International Telecommunication Union
  • The oldest specialized UN agency with more than 140 years of experience in communication sector
  • Headquarters in Geneva and Regional Offices
  • ITU Staff: more than 750 from more than 80 countries
  • 189 member states, more than 640 sector members
  • ITU Agenda for Change
  • Structure of the ITU
    • ITU-T – Telecom Standardization
    • ITU-R – Radio-communications
    • ITU-D – Development Bureau

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

itu strategy and policy unit
ITU Strategy and Policy Unit
  • New Initiatives Programme
    • Digital Bridges
    • Ubiquitous Network Societies
    • Today’s Networks Tomorrow
    • What rules for the NGNs?
    • Digital Transformations in the Information Society
    • Regulatory Environment for Future Mobile Multimedia Services
  • Internet Reports
    • Internet of Things
    • Portable Internet
    • Birth of Broadband

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

itu strategy and policy unit64
ITU Strategy and Policy Unit
  • Digital Opportunity Index
  • Content Team for the WSIS
  • WSIS Thematic Meetings
    • Countering Spam (2004)
    • Internet Governance (2004)
    • Cybersecurity (2005)
    • Multi-stakeholder Partnerships for Bridging the Digital Divide (2005)
  • Databases
    • The Golden Book Database and Publication (on-going)
    • WSIS Stocktaking Exercise and Reporting (on-going)
    • ICT Success Stories (Official Launch 2006)
    • Cyber Security Portal

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int

internship at the itu www itu int employment stages html
Internship at the ITUwww.itu.int/employment/stages.html
  • ITU internship programme
    • The Union runs a non-remunerated internship programme for students who wish to improve their skills and gain experience working in an international environment. This programme is open to all undergraduate and graduate students from ITU's 189 Member States. Candidates are selected in response to specific needs identified within ITU departments.
  • Strategy and Policy Unit competition
    • SPU launched its first essay-writing competition under the "Young Minds in Telecoms" Programme in November 2004. The competition was open to graduate students and recent graduates in economics, political science, law, literature, telecommunications, computer science, information systems and related fields.

No specific deadline for application

Deadline: 17 March 2005

Jaroslaw.Ponder@itu.int