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  1. Wellington Avalanche By: Jacob Damiter

  2. Wellington, Washington • Name got changed to Tye in October of 1910. • It was abandoned in 1929.

  3. Wellington, Washington • This town is now a ghost town. • Wellington is 14,074 Kilometers from Washington D.C.

  4. Time Period • The Wellington Avalanche took place in 1910. • Women wore hobble skirts.

  5. Styles of 1910 • Women also wore lingerie gowns or lace. • The hairstyle women wore was called Curtain Hair.

  6. Wellington Avalanche Facts It snowed for nine days straight . It snowed about 1 foot an hour.

  7. Wellington Avalanche Facts There were many snow plows ready. The snow plows could not penetrate the snow.

  8. Wellington Avalanche Facts When the snow kept accumulating the avalanches started. Snow stopped on Feb. 28th.

  9. Wellington Avalanche Facts • The snow was replaced by rain and warm wind. • Early on March 1st a slab of snow came loose.

  10. Wellington Avalanche Facts • The slab of snow was 10 ft. tall. • Also a half a mile long, quarter mile wide.

  11. Wellington Avalanche Facts • Avalanche hit a train depot and through trains 150 ft. downhill. • Their were 96 fatalities.

  12. Wellington Avalanche • Weather is a big factor on causing avalanches. • If there is a large amount of snow and the weather changes quickly it can cause one.

  13. Wellington Avalanche • An Avalanche can also occur when layers of snow are not bonded well.

  14. Wellington Avalanche • Terrain is also a factor in Avalanches. • If snow piles up on a slope between 25-55 degrees their may be an avalanche.

  15. Wellington Avalanche • If there is a long warm front moving into snow filled areas, avalanches can occur.

  16. Wellington Avalanche • Tree covered areas are less vulnerable to avalanches, because they support the snow better.

  17. Wellington Avalanche • Wind is also a big factor to avalanches. • Wind could make uneven balances of snow on one side and that side might break and make an avalanche.