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43 Things: The Library Edition
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  1. 43 Things: The Library Edition • Why is this presentation called 43 Things? • It's based on the popular social networking site, 43 Things, where users create accounts and then share lists of goals and hopes. • It’s the first prime number after 42, which we all know isthe Ultimate Answer to the Great Question of Life, the Universe, and Everything. • In the parlance of Getting Things Done, a Tickler File consists of a series of 43 file folders: 12 monthly and 31 daily folders. • Plus, 43 is just the right number of ideas for a one-hour session at Tri-Conference.

  2. What’s the point? • People have known for years that making a list of goals is the best way to achieve them. But most of us never get around to making a list. • You can use the ideas you hear today to inspire your own 43 Things. Or, set up your own goals from scratch. Either way, the intent is to stimulate action!

  3. 1 • Create a Flickr account and upload some photos.

  4. 2 • Read a graphic novel, cover to cover.

  5. 3 • Visit Second Life.

  6. 4 • Visit a library (not your own) and act like a patron.

  7. 5 • Start using an aggregator such as Bloglines for RSS feeds.

  8. 6 • Download and play with a browser other than Internet Explorer.

  9. 7 • Read your collection development policy. Do you have one? • Kansas City (MO) Public Library's Policy • Lawrence Public Library Policy

  10. 8 • Throw away some magazines/books you’ve had in storage.

  11. 9 • Weed your print reference collection…ruthlessly.

  12. 10 • Request an item using your library’s OPAC. • Follett Web Catalog

  13. 11 • Offer notary service at your library.

  14. 12 • Clean and dust your computer keyboard(s).

  15. 13 • Call your library on the telephone.

  16. 14 • Go into the men’s room (or ladies’ room) at your library.

  17. 15 • Download an audio book. • Free Digital Audio Books, Digital Music

  18. 16 • Find and request an item on WorldCat. • WorldCat via SLK First Search

  19. 17 • Edit an entry on Wikipedia.

  20. 18 • Download Picasa and organize your photos.

  21. 19 • Take down two unnecessary signs at your library.

  22. 20 • Find a library account on MySpace .

  23. 21 • Add a book in LibraryThing.

  24. 22 • Subscribe to a library-related blog. • The Goblin in the Library - Joshua Neff • librarian.net - Jessamyn West • Tame the Web - Michael Stephens • The Annoyed Librarian

  25. 23 • Watch a video on YouTube.

  26. 24 • Help someone learn to use a mouse (use a tutorial). • Mouserobics • Mouse Exercises at SeniorNet

  27. 25 • Fly to Tokyo with Google Earth.

  28. 26 • Explore the State Library of Kansas web site.

  29. 27 • Tell your children’s librarians how important they are. “I’ve often thought (and I’m sure I’m not alone) that the future of libraries rest in the hands of our children’s librarians. It’s actually quite poignant how that army of burden has been routed to a group of librarians who probably never considered that they would be given that kind of responsibility.” – John Blyberg 3/19/07

  30. 28 • Let patrons bring food and drink into your library.

  31. 29 • Visit and explore WebJunction Kansas.

  32. 30 • Participate in a National Library Week (April 15-21) activity.

  33. 31 • Start a New Technology Committee at your library. • Highlands Regional Library (NJ) Cooperative HRLC Technology Committee • Automation & Information Technology Committee (NY) • PLCMC (NC) Emerging Technology Committee • Wisconsin Library Information Technology Advisory Committee • The Library Network Technology Committee • NEKLS New Technology Committee

  34. 32 • Invite your mayor or city council to meet your library.

  35. 33 • Register for a library teleconference.

  36. 34 • Go wireless in your library. “I want to make the case for the benefits of having a ‘wifi blanket,’ by which I mean, loosely, making wireless Internet connectivity so common that we can rely on it being available just about anywhere we are in this country.” – David Weinberger

  37. 35 • Start a book club. • Morrill Public Library, Hiawatha • Louisburg Library • Lawrence Public Library – online book clubs

  38. 36 • Start a special collection (cake pans, fishing rods) at your library. Osage City’s cake pans Coffey County’s fishing rods

  39. 37 • Provide voter education resources at your library. • “Libraries Lead the Way for Voter Registration Services” • Using WordPress to set up voter info blogs • Voter information blogs • League of Women Voters • Guide to Voting in Kansas

  40. 38 • Hold a “Geek Out, Don’t Freak Out” (Andrea Mercado) session at your library. Ed & Jean explore their digital camera at Reading Public Library.

  41. 39 • Go to (or start) a regional library meeting. *fundraising *patron behavior issues *collection development *board relations *staffing *technology concerns *programming *community partnerships *scheduling *staff morale

  42. 40 • Listen to a podcast or watch a video podcast. LibraryPods

  43. 41 • Make a “Staff Recommends” display in your library. A popular activity in the library is Student Picks. Students pick their favorite books and put them on display in the library. A banner distinguishes them as a great read! We have a permanent Staff Picks display at our branch. What I did is type up people's comments, so they could be printed out as a little card.

  44. 42 • Use plain English signs for your non-fiction collection.

  45. 43 • Pilot a public access computer management system such as LibraryMetricks.

  46. Thank you! Mickey Coalwell Library Development Consultant Northeast Kansas Library System (NEKLS) mcoalwell@nekls.org This presentation is available from the NEKLS website, www.nekls.org