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Introduction to Community Asset Mapping. 26 August 2009 Mary E. Homan, MA Missouri Institute of Mental Health University of Missouri School of Medicine. Differences between needs-based assessment approach & asset-based assessment approach. What is a community asset?.

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Introduction to Community Asset Mapping


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    1. Introduction to Community Asset Mapping 26 August 2009 Mary E. Homan, MA Missouri Institute of Mental Health University of Missouri School of Medicine

    2. Differences between needs-based assessment approach & asset-based assessment approach

    3. What is a community asset?

    4. Why should community assets be identified? • External resources are not available • Identifying and mobilizing community assets enables community residents to gain control over their lives. • Improvement efforts are more effective, and longer-lasting, when community members dedicate their time and talents to changes they desire. • Provides necessary information allowing people to become producers rather than problems.

    5. When should community assets be identified? • When you don't know what those assets are • When talent is underutilized • When you are unable to provide traditional services • When you want to encourage pride among residents • When you want to strengthen or build relationships

    6. Questions to think about when identifying assets • What is the size of our community? • Who is available to do the work? • How much time is there for the task? • How much money is at our disposal? • What do we want to accomplish? • Who is this most going to help? • What are we going to do with the results?

    7. How do we identify community assets? • Asset-Based Inventories • Individual Capacity Inventory • Community Capacity Inventory

    8. Individual Capacity Inventory • A simple survey designed to identify the multitude of abilities within each individual • skills and abilities you’ve learned through experience in the home or with the family, • skills you’ve learned at church or elsewhere, • any skills you’ve learned on the job.

    9. Community Capacity Inventory • Asks “Who has a stake in our community?” • Thoroughly documents existing assets & resources • Uses results to plan programs • Connects skilled community members and organizations with people and organizations in need of those skills

    10. Two major stakeholder categories • Assets and capacities located inside the neighborhood, largely under neighborhood control (primary) • Assets located within the community but largely controlled by outsiders (secondary)

    11. Primary Stakeholder Categories

    12. Secondary Stakeholder Categories

    13. Potential Resources • Resources originating outside the neighborhood, controlled by outsiders (potential resources) • Investment developments • Welfare expenditures • Public capital improvement expenditures • Public information

    14. What do asset maps look like?

    15. Source: University Outreach and Extension at University of Missouri System and Lincoln University http://extension.missouri.edu/about/fy00-03/assetmapping.htm

    16. How does GIS help with asset mapping? But first, what is GIS?

    17. GIS explained • GIS (Geographic Information Systems) is a tool that allows for the analysis of spatially based information • GIS uses a method of digital mapping that links data to their physical location • This can show you where particular people, events, things, or conditions are, and give you other information about them as well

    18. Basic needs of GIS systems • Hardware with enough power to run the GIS software. • GIS software with the capabilities you need. • Accurate data, in a form that can be fed into the software program. • People trained to use the GIS system

    19. Two kinds of data are needed • The desired physical and political features of the map you want.  • The location information about the other features you’re interested in.

    20. Why use GIS in asset mapping? • GIS can help you determine the how seriously an issue affects an area or the community as a whole • Using a GIS application is the quickest and most efficient method of creating maps and similar graphics that provide a picture of not only the geographic, but of the social, demographic, environmental, political, and other aspects of an area

    21. Source: Colorado Campus Compact http://academic.regis.edu/ccc/ACCESS%20CO/DenverArvadaAssetMaps.htm

    22. Mason, Michael, Cheung, Ivan, & Walker, Leslie. (2009). “Creating a Geospatial Database of Risks and Resources to Explore Urban Adolescent Substance Use.” Journal of Prevention & Intervention in the Community. 37(1):21-34.

    23. Townley, Greg, Kloos, Bret & Wright, Patricia A. (2009). “Understanding the experience of place: Expanding methods to conceptualize and measure community integration of persons with serious mental illness.” Health & Place. 15(2009): 520-531.

    24. References • KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2007). Chapter 3, Section 8: Identifying Community Assets and Resources. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved 6 August 2009 from the World Wide Web: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/section_1043.htm. • KU Work Group for Community Health and Development. (2007). Chapter 3, Section 16: Geographic Information Systems: Tools for Community Mapping. Lawrence, KS: University of Kansas. Retrieved 6 August 2009 from the World Wide Web: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/tablecontents/TableofContents3.16.htm. • McKnight, John & Kretzmann, John. (1996). Mapping Community Capacity. Evanston, IL: Institute for Policy Research, Northwestern University. Retrieved 6 August 2009 from World Wide Web: http://www.northwestern.edu/ipr/publications/papers/mcc.pdf • Goldman, Karen Denard & Schmalz, Kathleen Jahn. (2005). “ ‘Accentuate the Positive!’ Using an Asset-Mapping Tool as Part of a Community-Health Needs Assessment.” Health Promotion Practice 6(2):125-128. • Colorado Campus Campact. (2006). Denver & Arvada Asset Maps. Denver, CO: Regis University. Retrieved 21 August 2009 from the World Wide Web: http://academic.regis.edu/ccc/ACCESS%20CO/DenverArvadaAssetMaps.htm. • Townley, Greg, Kloos, Bret & Wright, Patricia A. (2009). “Understanding the experience of place: Expanding methods to conceptualize and measure community integration of persons with serious mental illness.” Health & Place. 15(2009):520-531. • Mason, Michael, Cheung, Ivan, & Walker, Leslie. (2009). “Creating a Geospatial Database of Risks and Resources to Explore Urban Adolescent Substance Use.” Journal of Prevention & Intervention in the Community. 37(1):21-34. • Lohmann, Andrew & Schoelkopf, Laurie E. (2009). “GIS: A Useful Tool for Community Assessment.” Journal of Prevention & Intervention in the Community. 37(1):1-4. • Quon Huber, Melissa S. et al. (2009). “GIS Applications for Community-Based Research and Action: Mapping Change in a Community-Building Initiative .” Journal of Prevention & Intervention in the Community. 37(1):5-20.