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Educational Portfolios: an Overview. Types of Portfolios. Creators: Students Details on subsequent slides Faculty For tenure review Benchmark course portfolios (current state of learning) Inquiry course portfolios (track change across sections) Institutions Accreditation Recruiting.

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types of portfolios
Types of Portfolios
  • Creators:
    • Students
      • Details on subsequent slides
    • Faculty
      • For tenure review
      • Benchmark course portfolios (current state of learning)
      • Inquiry course portfolios (track change across sections)
    • Institutions
      • Accreditation
      • Recruiting
student portfolios
Student Portfolios
  • Functions:
    • Career portfolios demonstrate skills and supplement resume and cover letter
    • Assessment portfolios help determine if students have mastered information
    • Developmental portfolios help students make connections and articulate the intangible
  • Forms:
    • Paper, Web, CD-ROM, video, combination
career portfolios
Career Portfolios
  • Often viewed as “Electronic Resumes”
  • Demonstrates skills, samples of work, pictures, etc.
  • Allows employers to view the level of detail they want to see
  • Motivating power: High: similar to a resume
career portfolio dangers
Career Portfolio: Dangers
  • Resume and cover letter must stand on their own
    • Employers may not take time to look at them
    • Technology may be a barrier
  • Too much “flash” and not enough “substance”
  • Mid-level computer skills might not be good enough
career portfolio example
Career Portfolio: Example

Lisa Abate

(Student of Indiana University's Instructional Systems Technology program, which requires a final professional portfolio)

assessment portfolios
Assessment Portfolios
  • Determine if students have mastered information, skills, concepts
  • Used to assess writing, studio or applied art, teaching materials, etc.
  • Require collections of “artifacts”--papers, photos, drawings, lesson plans, etc.
  • Mid-term and final assessment of learning
  • Motivating power: Mid: similar to an exam
assessment portfolios dangers
Assessment Portfolios: Dangers
  • Poorly expressed or nonexistent goals for the Portfolio
  • Collecting too much information
  • End of course may be too late
  • May be redundant or inefficient, esp. for objectively-evaluated materials.
    • Do you really need a Portfolio to do the job?
assessment portfolios example
Assessment Portfolios: Example

Mark Kenefick

(Student of Indiana University's Instructional Systems Technology program, which requires a final professional portfolio)

developmental portfolios
Developmental Portfolios
  • Help students make connections and articulate the intangible
  • Enhance experiential learning through reflection
  • Help students make informed, intentional decisions
  • MAKE STUDENTS THINK!
  • Motivating power: Low: similar to a journal
developmental portfolios dangers
Developmental Portfolios: Dangers
  • Collection without reflections
  • Runs risk of becoming “just another requirement”
  • Must be completed thoughtfully to be beneficial
  • Web format does not guarantee connections
  • Students and faculty both need to understand why they are participating
developmental portfolios example
Developmental Portfolios: Example

Kate Jenks

(Student of Kalamazoo College, which requires an ongoing developmental portfolio)

portfolio types
Portfolio “Types”
  • Misnomer – most portfolios serve more than one purpose
  • Need to address each purpose individually and consciously
web vs paper portfolios
Web vs. Paper Portfolios
  • Web advantages
    • Easy accessibility and storage
    • Cross-linking capabilities
    • Improvement of computer skills
  • Web disadvantages
    • Software learning curve
    • Too much focus on format instead of content
    • Software and training costs
common conceptual features
Common Conceptual Features

Comparing pfolios from several disciplines, most have the following features:

  • Requirements (set by the college)
  • Benchmarks (set by state or a board)
  • Artifacts (collected student work)
  • Reflections or annotations (by student)
  • Comments (from professor or advisor)
  • “Resume” view (for employers)