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School-wide Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS ) What, Why, How. Rob Horner University of Oregon www.pbis.org. Goals. What : Define the core features of SWPBIS Why : Define if SWPBS is appropriate for your school How : Define the process for implementing SWPBIS

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school wide positive behavior interventions and supports pbis what why how

School-wide Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS)What, Why, How

Rob Horner

University of Oregon www.pbis.org

goals
Goals
  • What: Define the core features of SWPBIS
  • Why: Define if SWPBS is appropriate for your school
  • How: Define the process for implementing SWPBIS

--------------------------------------------------------

  • Link: SWPBIS with (a) Academic Supports, (b) Mental Health and (c) Social, Emotional Learning
  • Establish: Quality, Equity, Efficiency as guiding themes.
main messages
Main Messages
  • Supporting social behavior is central to achieving academic gains.
  • School-wide PBS is an evidence-based practice for building a positive social culture that will promote both social and academic success.
  • Implementation of any evidence-based practice requires a more coordinated focus than typically expected.
six basic recommendations for implementing pbis
Six Basic Recommendations for Implementing PBIS
  • Never stop doing what already works
  • Always look for the smallest change that will produce the largest effect
      • Avoid defining a large number of goals
      • Do a small number of things well
  • Do not add something new without also defining what you will stop doing to make the addition possible.
six basic recommendations for implementing pbis5
Six Basic Recommendations for Implementing PBIS
  • Collect and use data for decision-making
  • Adapt any initiative to make it “fit” your school community, culture, context.
      • Families
      • Students
      • Faculty
      • Fiscal-political structure
  • Establish policy clarity before investing in implementation
slide6

Michigan State Board of Education Positive Behavior Support Policy

The vision of the State Board of Education is to create learning environments that prepare students to be successful citizens in the 21st century. The educational community must provide a system that will support students’ efforts to manage their own behavior and assure academic achievement. An effective behavior support system is a proactive, positive, skill-building approach for the teaching and learning of successful student behavior. Positive behavior support systems ensure effective strategies that promote pro-social behavior and respectful learning environments. Research-based positive behavior support systems are appropriate for all students, regardless of age. The principles of Universal Education reflect the beliefs that each person deserves and needs a positive, concerned, accepting educational community that values diversity and provides a comprehensive system of individual supports from birth to adulthood. A positive behavior support policy incorporates the demonstration and teaching of positive, proactive social behaviors throughout the school environment. A positive behavior support system is a data-based effort that concentrates on adjusting the system that supports the student. Such a system is implemented by collaborative, school-based teams using person-centered planning. School-wide expectations for behavior are clearly stated, widely promoted, and frequently referenced. Both individual and school-wide learning and behavior problems are assessed comprehensively. Functional assessment of learning and behavior challenges is linked to an intervention that focuses on skill building. The effectiveness of the selected intervention is evaluated and reviewed, leading to data-based revisions. Positive interventions that support adaptive and pro-social behavior and build on the strengths of the student lead to an improved learning environment. Students are offered a continuum of methods that help them learn and maintain appropriate behavior and discourage violation of codes of student conduct. In keeping with this vision, it is the policy of the State Board of Education that each school district in Michigan implement a system of school-wide positive behavior support strategies.

Adopted September 12, 2006

…it is the policy of the State Board of Education that each school district in Michigan implement a system of school-wide positive behavior support strategies.

experimental research on swpbis
Experimental Research on SWPBIS

SWPBIS Experimentally Related to:

Reduction in problem behavior

Increased academic performance

Increased attendance

Improved perception of safety

Improved organizational efficiency

Reduction in staff turnover

Increased perception of teacher efficacy

Bradshaw, C.P., Koth, C.W., Thornton, L.A., & Leaf, P.J. (2009). Altering school climate through school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports: Findings from a group-randomized effectiveness trial. Prevention Science, 10(2), 100-115

Bradshaw, C.P., Koth, C.W., Bevans, K.B., Ialongo, N., & Leaf, P.J. (2008). The impact of school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) on the organizational health of elementary schools. School Psychology Quarterly, 23(4), 462-473.

Bradshaw, C. P., Mitchell, M. M., & Leaf, P. J. (2010). Examining the effects of School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports on student outcomes: Results from a randomized controlled effectiveness trial in elementary schools. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 12, 133-148.

Bradshaw, C.P., Reinke, W. M., Brown, L. D., Bevans, K.B., & Leaf, P.J. (2008). Implementation of school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) in elementary schools: Observations from a randomized trial. Education & Treatment of Children, 31, 1-26.

Horner, R., Sugai, G., Smolkowski, K., Eber, L., Nakasato, J., Todd, A., & Esperanza, J., (2009). A randomized, wait-list controlled effectiveness trial assessing school-wide positive behavior support in elementary schools. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 11, 133-145.

Horner, R. H., Sugai, G., & Anderson, C. M. (2010). Examining the evidence base for school-wide positive behavior support. Focus on Exceptionality, 42(8), 1-14.

Bradshaw, C., Waasdorp, T., Leaf. P., (in press). Effects of School-wide positive behavioral interventions and supports on child behavior problems and adjustment. Pediatrics.

Waasdorp, T., Bradshaw, C., & Leaf , P., (2012) The Impact of Schoolwide Positive Behavioral Interventions and

Supports on Bullying and Peer Rejection: A Randomized Controlled Effectiveness Trial.Archive of

Pediatric Adolescent Medicine.2012;166(2):149-156

experimental research on swpbis9
Experimental Research on SWPBIS

Bradshaw, C.P., Koth, C.W., Thornton, L.A., & Leaf, P.J. (2009). Altering school climate through school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports: Findings from a group-randomized effectiveness trial. Prevention Science, 10(2), 100-115

Bradshaw, C.P., Koth, C.W., Bevans, K.B., Ialongo, N., & Leaf, P.J. (2008). The impact of school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) on the organizational health of elementary schools. School Psychology Quarterly, 23(4), 462-473.

Bradshaw, C. P., Mitchell, M. M., & Leaf, P. J. (2010). Examining the effects of School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports on student outcomes: Results from a randomized controlled effectiveness trial in elementary schools. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 12, 133-148.

Bradshaw, C.P., Reinke, W. M., Brown, L. D., Bevans, K.B., & Leaf, P.J. (2008). Implementation of school-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) in elementary schools: Observations from a randomized trial. Education & Treatment of Children, 31, 1-26.

Horner, R., Sugai, G., Smolkowski, K., Eber, L., Nakasato, J., Todd, A., & Esperanza, J., (2009). A randomized, wait-list controlled effectiveness trial assessing school-wide positive behavior support in elementary schools. Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 11, 133-145.

Horner, R. H., Sugai, G., & Anderson, C. M. (2010). Examining the evidence base for school-wide positive behavior support. Focus on Exceptionality, 42(8), 1-14.

Bradshaw, C., Waasdorp, T., Leaf. P., (in press). Effects of School-wide positive behavioral interventions and supports on child behavior problems and adjustment. Pediatrics.

Waasdorp, T., Bradshaw, C., & Leaf , P., (2012) The Impact of Schoolwide Positive Behavioral Interventions and

Supports on Bullying and Peer Rejection: A Randomized Controlled Effectiveness Trial.Archive of

Pediatric Adolescent Medicine.2012;166(2):149-156

academic behavior connection
Academic-Behavior Connection

Algozzine, B., Wang, C., & Violette, A. S. (2011). Reexamining the relationship between academic achievement and social behavior. Journal of Positive Behavioral Interventions, 13, 3-16.

Algozzine, R., Putnam, R., & Horner, R. (2012). Support for teaching students with learning disabilities academic skills and social behaviors within a response-to-intervention model: Why it doesn’t matter what comes first. Insights on Learning Disabilities, 9(1), 7-36.

Burke, M. D., Hagan-Burke, S., & Sugai, G. (2003). The efficacy of function-based interventions for students with learning disabilities who exhibit escape-maintained problem behavior: Preliminary results from a single case study. Learning Disabilities Quarterly, 26, 15-25.

McIntosh, K., Chard, D. J., Boland, J. B., & Horner, R. H. (2006). Demonstration of combined efforts in school-wide academic and behavioral systems and incidence of reading and behavior challenges in early elementary grades. Journal of Positive Behavioral Interventions, 8, 146-154.

McIntosh, K., Horner, R. H., Chard, D. J., Dickey, C. R., and Braun, D. H. (2008). Reading skills and function of problem behavior in typical school settings. Journal of Special Education, 42, 131-147.

Nelson, J. R., Johnson, A., & Marchand-Martella, N. (1996). Effects of direct instruction, cooperative learning, and independent learning practices on the classroom behavior of students with behavioral disorders: A comparative analysis. Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 4, 53-62.

Wang, C., & Algozzine, B. (2011). Rethinking the relationship between reading and behavior in early elementary school. Journal of Educational Research, 104, 100-109.

school wide pbis outcomes
School-wide PBIS: Outcomes
  • Reduction in problem behavior
  • Improved academic performance
  • Improved perceived school safety
  • Reduction in staff turnover

31 176

slide13

Count of School Implementing SWPBIS by State

August, 2011

Illinois

12 States > 500 Schools

Michigan

using pbis to achieve quality equity and efficiency
Using PBIS to AchieveQuality, Equity and Efficiency
  • QUALITY: Using what works; Linking Academic and Behavior Supports
    • North Carolina (valued outcomes)
    • Michigan (behavior and literacy supports)
    • Commitment to Fidelity Measures
    • Building functional logic/ theory/ practice (Sanford)
  • EQUITY: Making schools work for all
    • Scott Ross
    • Russ Skiba
    • Vincent, Cartledge, May & Tobin
    • Bully prevention
  • EFFICIENCY: Working Smarter: Building implementation science into large scale adoption.
    • Using teacher and student time better.
    • Dean Fixsen/ Oregon Dept of Education
slide15
Time Cost of aDiscipline Referral(Avg. 45 minutes per incident for student 30 min for Admin 15 min for Teacher)
what does a reduction of 850 office referrals and 25 suspensions mean kennedy middle school
What does a reduction of 850 office referrals and 25 suspensions mean? Kennedy Middle School
  • Savings in Administrative time
  • ODR = 15 min
  • Suspension = 45 min
  • 13,875 minutes
  • 231 hours
  • 29, 8-hour days
  • Savings in Student Instructional time
  • ODR = 45 min
  • Suspension = 216 min
  • 43,650 minutes
  • 728 hours
  • 121, 6-hour school days
readiness for implementation
Readiness for Implementation
  • Appreciate the stages of adopting something new
      • Exploration, Installation, Partial Implementation, Full Implementation, Innovation, Sustainability
  • Make sure the elements for implementation are in place:
    • Team (administrator, core representatives)
    • Commitment to vision, and training time
    • Coaching support
readiness for implementation19
Readiness for Implementation
  • Invest in the systems needed to support high fidelity implementation
        • Team process
        • Data collection, summary and use
  • Build whole-school systems before more intense support systems.
  • Use data regularly to determine (a) fidelity and (b) impact
        • Team Implementation Checklist (TIC) to self-assess and action plan every two months
        • Office discipline referral data (weekly, monthly)
what is swpbis
WHAT IS SWPBIS
  • Logic
  • Core Features
logic for school wide pbis
Logic for School-wide PBIS
  • Schools face a set of difficult challenges today
      • Multiple expectations (Academic accomplishment, Social competence, Safety)
      • Students arrive at school with widely differing understandings of what is socially acceptable.
      • Traditional “get tough” and “zero tolerance” approaches are insufficient.
  • Individual student interventions
      • Effective, but can’t meet need
  • School-wide discipline systems
      • Establish a social culture within which both social and academic success is more likely
context
Context
  • Problem behavior continues to be the primary reason why individuals in our society are excluded from school, home, recreation, community, and work.
problem behaviors
Insubordination, noncompliance, defiance, late to class, nonattendance, truancy, fighting, aggression, inappropriate language, social withdrawal, excessive crying, stealing, vandalism, property destruction, tobacco, drugs, alcohol, unresponsive, not following directions, inappropriate use of school materials, weapons, harassment 1, harassment 2, harassment 3, unprepared to learn, parking lot violation, irresponsible, trespassing, disrespectful, disrupting teaching, uncooperative, violent behavior, disruptive, verbal abuse, physical abuse, dress code, other, etc., etc., etc.

Vary in intensity

Exist in every school, home and community context

Place individuals at risk physically, emotionally, academically and socially

Are expensive: For society, schools, classrooms, students, families

Problem Behaviors
the challenge of too many initiatives
The challenge of too many initiatives

Wraparound

Early Intervention

Literacy

Equity

Positive Behavior Support

Family Support

Math

Response to Intervention

alignment for systems change
Alignment for Systems change

Response to Intervention/Prevention

Primary Prevention

Universal Screening

Multi-tiered Support

Early Intervention

Progress Monitoring

Systems to support practices

Early Intervention

Literacy

Wraparound

ALIGNMENT

Math

Family Support

Behavior Support

Student Outcomes

© Dean Fixsen, Karen Blase, Robert Horner, George Sugai, 2008

what is school wide positive behavior intervention and support
What is School-wide Positive Behavior Intervention and Support?
  • School-wide PBIS is:
    • A framework for establishing the social culture and behavioral supports needed for a school to be an effective learning environment (academic and behavior) for all students.
  • Evidence-based features of SWPBIS
    • Prevention
    • Define and teach positive social expectations
    • Acknowledge positive behavior
    • Arrange consistent consequences for problem behavior
    • On-going collection and use of data for decision-making
    • Continuum of intensive, individual intervention supports.
    • Implementation of the systems that support effective practices
school wide positive behavioral interventions and supports swpbis

The social culture of a school matters.

A continuum of supports that begins with the whole school and extends to intensive, wraparound support for individual students and their families.

Effective practices with the systems needed for high fidelity and sustainability

Multiple tiers of intensity

School-wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (SWPBIS)
establishing a social culture
Establishing a Social Culture

Common Language

MEMBERSHIP

Common Experience

Common Vision/Values

school wide pbs
School-wide PBS
  • Establishing additional supports for students with more intense needs
slide30

Tertiary Prevention:

Specialized

Individualized

Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior

SCHOOL-WIDE

POSITIVE BEHAVIOR

SUPPORT

~5%

Secondary Prevention:

Specialized Group

Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior

~15%

Primary Prevention:

School-/Classroom-

Wide Systems for

All Students,

Staff, & Settings

~80% of Students

27

slide32

Math

Remember that the multiple tiers of support refer to our SUPPORT not Students.

Avoid creating a new disability labeling system.

Behavior

Health

Reading

slide33

ESTABLISHING CONTINUUM of SWPBS

  • TERTIARY PREVENTION
  • Function-based support
  • Wraparound
  • Person-centered planning
  • Check and Connect
  • TERTIARY PREVENTION

~5%

~15%

  • SECONDARY PREVENTION
  • Check in/ Check out
  • Targeted social skills instruction
  • Anger Management
  • Social skills club
  • First Step to Success
  • SECONDARY PREVENTION
  • PRIMARY PREVENTION
  • Teach SW expectations
  • Consistent Consequences
  • Positive reinforcement
  • Classroom Systems
  • Parent engagement
  • Bully Prevention
  • PRIMARY PREVENTION

~80% of Students

slide34

Supporting Social Competence,

Academic Achievement and Safety

School-wide PBIS

OUTCOMES

Supporting

Student

Behavior

Supporting

Decision

Making

PRACTICES

DATA

SYSTEMS

Supporting

Staff Behavior

create effective learning environments
Create Effective Learning Environments
  • Predictable
  • Consistent
  • Positive
  • Safe
action rate your school culture 1 use a student perspective 2 use a staff perspective
Action: Rate your school culture1. Use a student perspective2. Use a staff perspective
define school wide expectations for social behavior
Define School-wide Expectationsfor Social Behavior
  • Identify 3-5 Expectations
  • Short statements
  • Positive Statements (what to do, not what to avoid doing)
  • Memorable
  • Examples:
      • Be Respectful, Be Responsible, Be Safe, Be Kind, Be a Friend, Be-there-be-ready, Hands and feet to self, Respect self, others, property, Do your best, Follow directions of adults
activity behavioral expectations
Activity: Behavioral Expectations
  • Define your school-wide expectations
    • 3-5, Positively stated
    • Core social values
    • Terms that will be comfortable for students, families, staff
  • How will you make the expectations memorable?
teach behavioral expectations
Teach Behavioral Expectations
  • Transform broad school-wide Expectations into specific, observable behaviors.
      • Use the Expectations by Settings Matrix
  • Teach in the actual settings where behaviors are to occur
  • Teach (a) the words, and (b) the actions.
  • Teach “When” as well as “How” to behave
  • Build a social culture that is predictable, and focused on student success.
activity teaching matrix
Activity: Teaching Matrix
  • List your expectations and your locations on the Teaching matrix
  • Select one location in the school
  • Define how you would teach the expectations in that location.
    • Present “words”…expectations
    • Present rationale, and definitional rule
    • Present positive examples
    • Present negative (non) examples
    • Provide an activity in which all students practice
slide43

School-Wide

Positive Behavior

Support

Tertiary Prevention:

Specialized

Individualized

Systems for Students with High-Risk Behavior

~5%

Secondary Prevention:

Specialized Group

Systems for Students with At-Risk Behavior

Primary Prevention:

School-/Classroom-

Wide Systems for

All Students,

Staff, & Settings

~15%

~80% of Students

implications for bully prevention
Implications for Bully Prevention
  • Build on school-wide social culture
        • Do not add a NEW program to what you already do
        • All students know what “respect” means
  • Avoid deviancy training: (do NOT teach bullying)
  • Teach a school-wide signal for “stop”
  • Teach all students what to do if asked to “stop”
teach a three step skill that can be used in all places at all times keep it simple
Teach a Three-Step Skill that can be used in all places at all times. Keep it simple

If you encounter behavior that is NOT respectful

Stop -------- Walk -------- Talk

Say and Show

“STOP”

Walk Away

  • Talk to an Adult
slide46

1.88

.88

3.14

Baseline

Acquisition

Full BP-PBS Implementation

Rob

School 1

Number of Incidents of Bullying Behavior

Bruce

Cindy

School 2

Scott

Anne

School 3

Ken

72%

School Days

slide47

19% decrease

28% increase

BP-PBS, Scott Ross

slide48

22% decrease

21% increase

BP-PBS, Scott Ross

key messages
Key Messages
  • Bully prevention starts by establishing a positive school-wide social culture.
  • Bully prevention involves empowering students to withhold rewards for bullying.
  • Add the smallest changes that generate the largest effects
  • Always collect data on both fidelity and impact.
slide50

Why Embed Expectations

into Curriculum?

  • Behavior curriculum does not have to be separate
  • Helps to eliminate time crunches
  • Provides a rationale for student- helps students to see how the expectations fit into everyday life
  • Meets best practices approach
    • Hands on activities
    • Meets all learning styles (oral, visual, kinesthetic)
    • Higher order learning activates (synthesize, analyze, etc.)
slide51

Embedding Expectations into

Current Daily Curriculum

  • Social Studies
    • Have students research different cultures to find out how they define “Respectful”
    • Talk about how different historical events occurred because of conflict and come up with solutions on how the conflict could have been resolved
slide52

Embedding Expectations into

Current Daily Curriculum

  • Language Arts and Reading
    • Use a novel that has an expectation as a theme
    • Discuss characters in a novel and how they did not show respect, then have the students write the story with the character showing respect
    • Have the students develop their own expectations and/or rules and then have them write a persuasive essay or debate why theirs should be used instead of the school’s
slide53

Embedding Expectations into

Current Daily Curriculum

  • Fine Arts (Music, Art, Computers, Graphics)
  • When choosing a school play, choose one with a theme centered around one of the school expectations or write your own play
  • Have the students compose a song/rap with the expectation
  • Have students come up with a campaign for promoting expectations to the entire student body
slide54

Embedding Expectations into

Current Daily Curriculum

  • Science and/or Math
  • Have students develop a hypothesis about what they think are the top behavior problems at school. Have them survey students, parents, & teachers; make graphs; and reach a conclusion about the hypothesis
  • Have the students count the number of tickets redeemed monthly for prizes & graph them. You can include ratio of number of tickets to student, # of tickets per teacher, etc.
teaching behavioral expectations

Select Expectations

  • Define Expectations
  • Teach Expectations
  • Embed Expectations
  • Revisit Expectations
  • 3-5 Expectations
  • Teaching Matrix
  • Teaching Plans (by location)
    • Teaching Schedule
  • Curriculum Integration
  • Booster Training Plan
Teaching Behavioral Expectations
on going reward of appropriate behavior
On-going Reward of Appropriate Behavior
  • Every faculty and staff member acknowledges appropriate behavior.
      • 5 to 1 ratio of positive to negative contacts
  • System that makes acknowledgement easy and simple for students and staff.
  • Different strategies for acknowledging appropriate behavior (small frequent rewards more effective)
      • Beginning of class recognition
      • Raffles
      • Open gym
      • Social acknowledgement
are rewards dangerous
Are Rewards Dangerous?
  • “…our research team has conducted a series of reviews and analysis of (the reward) literature; our conclusion is that there is no inherent negative property of reward. Our analyses indicate that the argument against the use of rewards is an overgeneralization based on a narrow set of circumstances.”
    • Judy Cameron, 2002
    • Cameron, 2002
    • Cameron & Pierce, 1994, 2002
    • Cameron, Banko & Pierce, 2001
  • “The undermining effect of extrinsic reward on intrinsic motivation remains unproven”
          • Steven Reiss, 2005
  • Akin-Little, K. A., Eckert, T. L., Lovett, B. J., & Little, S. G. (2004). Extrinsic reinforcement in the classroom: Bribery or best practices. School Psychology Review, 33, 344-362

Use of rewards in

Education

slide58

“What the Worlds Greatest Managers Do Differently” -- Buckingham & Coffman 2002, GallupInterviews with 1 million workers, 80,000 managers, in 400 companies.

  • Create working environments where employees:
      • 1. Know what is expected
      • 2. Have the materials and equipment to do the job correctly
      • 3. Receive recognition each week for good work.
      • 4. Have a supervisor who cares, and pays attention
      • 5. Receive encouragement to contribute and improve
      • 6. Can identify a person at work who is a “best friend.”
      • 7. Feel the mission of the organization makes them feel like their jobs are important
      • 8. See the people around them committed to doing a good job
      • 9. Feel like they are learning new things (getting better)
      • 10. Have the opportunity to do their job well.
activity
Activity
  • How do we acknowledge the social behavior of students?
    • 1. Individual students
    • 2. Groups/Classrooms
    • 3. Whole school
classroom systems 10 core elements
Classroom Systems: 10 core elements
  • Classroom expectations
  • Classroom routines taught
  • Active supervision
  • Positive environment (5:1 pos to neg ratio)
  • Functional physical layout
  • Maximize academic engagement
  • High rate of student academic success (85%)
  • Varied modes of instruction
  • Predictable responses to problem behavior
  • Efficient system for requesting assistance
good morning class
“Good morning, class!”

Teachers report that when students are greeted by an adult in morning, it takes less time to complete morning routines & get first lesson started.

consequence systems
Consequence Systems
  • Policy and Logic
  • Problem behavior definitions
  • Discipline referral form
  • Guidelines for responding to problem behavior
      • Is there a common rule for when to send a student to the office?
      • Are there “levels” of response/ Flow chart of actions?
  • Data system
      • Regular reporting to full faculty
      • Active use of data for decision-making by those who collect the data.
slide64

General Procedure for Dealing with Problem Behaviors

Observe problem

behavior

Is

behavior

major?

Find a place to talk with student(s)

NO

YES

Ensure safety

Problem solve

Write referral &

Escort student to office

Problem solve

Determine

consequence

Determine

consequence

Follow procedure

documented

Follow

documented

procedure

Does

student

have 3?

NO

YES

Follow

through with

consequences

Send

referral to

office

File necessary

documentation

File necessary

documentation

Follow up

with student

within a

week

data system for decision making
Data System for Decision-making
  • Efficient system to summarize and report the data
slide67

Ask:

What is our current “pattern?”

What is typical?

What is possible?

What is needed?

75th Percentile

Median

25th Percentile

key expectations of effective data systems
Key expectations of effective data systems
  • Clear definitions for problem behavior
  • Office discipline referral form that takes no more than 15 sec to complete
  • Data entry requires no more than 30s per ODR
  • Data summary produces Big 5 Graphs easily
        • ODR per day
        • ODR per problem behavior
        • ODR per location
        • ODR per student
        • ODR per time of day
  • Data are reported to staff regularly (monthly) and use for decision-making regularly (weekly)
activity consequences and data
Activity: Consequences and Data
  • Do we have a rule/guideline for what behavior should be managed in class versus sent to office?
      • Operational definitions, Levels?
  • Do we have an efficient system for submitting office discipline referrals?
  • Build the flow chart defining discipline decision rules?
  • What data do faculty see about student behavior on a regular (monthly) basis? What do we need to use discipline data for decision-making?
implementation elements
Implementation Elements
  • Team Training:
      • 3-4 Events per year over a 2-3 year period
      • Teams: Administrator, 3-7 individuals, district coach
  • Coaching/Trainer capacity
      • District coach
      • District/County trainers
  • Leadership Team
      • Policies, Hiring, Annual Eval, Orientation,
  • Evaluation
      • Fidelity, and Impact
how is swpbis implemented
HOW IS SWPBIS Implemented?
  • Nine Implementation Steps
    • Build commitment
    • Establish implementation team
    • Self-Assess for local adaptation of SWPBS
    • Define and teach expectations
    • Establish system for recognizing positive behavior
    • Establish consequences for problem behavior
    • Establish classroom management structure
    • Collect and use data for decision-making
    • Establish function-based support for students with more severe support needs.
slide72

Visibility

Political

Support

Funding

Policy

Leadership Team

Active Coordination

Training

Coaching

Behavioral

Expertise

Evaluation

Local School/District Teams/Demonstrations

implementation stages

2 – 3 Years

Implementation Stages
  • Exploration
  • Installation
  • Initial Implementation
  • Full Implementation
  • Innovation
  • Sustainability

Implementation occurs in stages:

Fixsen, Naoom, Blase, Friedman, & Wallace, 2005

using self assessment of fidelity
Using Self-Assessment of Fidelity
  • To make real change, you need a repeated self-assessment process.
      • “Are we doing the core features?”
  • Three options:
      • Research Quality: School-wide Evaluation Tool (SET)
      • Progress monitoring: Team Implementation Checklist (TIC)
      • Annual Self-Assessment: Benchmark of Quality (BoQ)
why consider swpbis
WHY CONSIDER SWPBIS
  • SWPBIS possible?
  • SWPBIS is needed in our school?
  • SWPBIS benefits our students, staff, families?
    • Reduction in problem behavior
    • Increased attendance and academic engagement
    • Improve academic performance
    • Reduction in referrals to special education
    • Improve family involvement in school
    • Improved perception of school as a “safe environment”
    • Improved perception of teacher efficacy
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I write to you today as a former Jackson Elementary school student who wishes to convey her fondest of gratitude toward a fantastic school. As I grow older and move from state to state, I never forget my roots and where my future began….           Though I had only attended Jackson for roughly four years during kindergarten, first, second, and third grade, I realize now that those years were just as important as any other and I am proud to say that I was once a Jaguar.    Without further ado, I would like to state that nine years later I still remember your kindness, your positivity, and most of all the three R's: Respect yourself, Respect others, and Respect property.Those three lessons have stuck with me throughout the years, from age eight to seventeen, and have bettered me as a human being.    In essence, I simply dropped by to express my thanks, and to reassure the staff of Jackson Elementary that their hard work does not go to waste, and that even the simplest of actions or words can spur on a revolution.Thank you very much for giving me the opportunity to live my life to its fullest.Sincerely,

High School Student writing to her grade school principal

summary
Summary
  • School-wide PBIS is a whole-school approach for building the social culture and behavior supports needed to make the school a more effective social and academic setting for all.

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  • Is SWPBIS needed in your school?
  • Is SWPBIS the most effective option for your school?
  • Are you willing to invest the 2-3 years to put this in place with high fidelity and impact?
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Values

Science

Practices that affect quality of life

Practices that work

PBIS

Vision

Practices that are practical, durable and available