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NYC DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION

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  1. NYC DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION The Borough Jail Plan: Increasing community access to a right-sized city jail system. Spring 2009 NYC Department of Correction: March 2009

  2. The New York City Department of Correction • NYC-DOC is a jail system with over 100,000 admissions each year and an average daily population of about 14,000 people. • 12,000 of these 14,000 people are currently housed in 9 different facilities on Rikers Island. • 80% of the people in our custody are being held by the Department as their cases are processed (“detainees”); only about 20% are serving sentenced time (of one year or less). • The department transports over 1,500 of these detained people per day to courts in the 5 boroughs. • The average length of stay for all people in the city jail system is 45 days; 50% of our people leave within 10 days or less. • Friends and family members make over 317,000 visits to people in our facilities each year, over 268,000 to people on Rikers. NYC Department of Correction: March 2009

  3. The Borough Jail Plan • Close and demolish 75% of beds in temporary housing areas on Rikers Island (4,600 beds). • Replace some of these beds with safe, modern, accessible jail space and reducetotal capacity by more than 3,000 beds, (from 20,757 to 17,755). • Reduce bed capacity on Rikers Island by almost 4,000 beds (from 17,421 to 13,878 beds) and move people closer to their communities by • Reopening and expanding the Brooklyn House. • Opening a New Bronx Jail. NYC Department of Correction: March 2009

  4. The Problem with Rikers Island • Rikers Island is difficult to access for families, lawyers and service providers. • Transporting detainees from Rikers Island to the court is much less efficient than housing them near the court. • It is more expensive to build and maintain similar jails on Rikers Island than in the boroughs. Over a thirty year lifecycle, our Borough Jail plan is $400 million less expensive than the Rikers Island alternative. • The single access bridge leaves the entire criminal justice system susceptible to disruption by any group or natural disaster. • The island’s infrastructure is already overtaxed: • Most of the expansion is on landfill, which comprises 80% of Rikers Island. • Water mains break frequently due to landfill ground settlement, making jail capacity vulnerable to immediate closure. As a result, the sewage system is also deficient. • Airport height restrictions limit the island to inefficiently designed jails with long corridors and illogical, difficult-to-secure perimeters. NYC Department of Correction: March 2009

  5. New York City is in the middle of an effort to reduce its jail capacity by more than 3,000 beds. 6% Decrease (-1,243 Beds) 15% Decrease (-3,042 Beds) 20,797 19,554 17,755 NYC Department of Correction: March 2009

  6. Thousands of jail beds in temporary housing units on Rikers are scheduled for demolition; over 1,200 have already been demolished. DOC must replace some of this capacity—it should be replaced in the boroughs, NOT on Rikers Island. NYC Department of Correction: March 2009

  7. Why We Need a Brooklyn Jail • A jail located in the community provides better access for families, lawyers and service providers. • Access to support from family and friends can be critical in encouraging people to take advantage of programs and begin to prepare for successful reentry. • Research has shown that family involvement can significantly enhance the chances of successful reentry and reduce the risk of recidivism.[1] • To reduce the reliance on Rikers Island and maintain a jail in Brooklyn’s civic center, close to the courts. • Brooklyn people make up 26% of the City’s admissions and 33% of its discharges. • About 73,600 individual court deliveries were made to Brooklyn last year from Rikers Island, making it operationally more sensible to house them in Brooklyn. • Expansion of BKHOD will cost 50% less than construction of equivalent space on Rikers Island, and will reduce transportation costs. • Presents an opportunity to add retail space to existing jail front, meet community needs, further neighborhood redevelopment and improve pedestrian traffic. NYC Department of Correction: March 2009

  8. The expanded Brooklyn jail will allow DOC to house more Brooklyn inmates closer to their families and communities. Brooklyn residents make up 28% of the City’s admissions. Yet Brooklyn facilities currently have capacity for only 4% of individuals in DOC custody Brooklyn House of Detention NYC Department of Correction: March 2009

  9. Why We Need a Bronx Jail • Ajail located in the community provides better access for families, lawyers, and service providers. • To reduce the reliance on Rikers Island and maintain a jail closer to Bronx courts. • Bronx people make up 22% of the City’s admissions and 27% of its discharges. • About 63,300 individual court deliveries were made to the Bronx last year from Rikers Island, making it operationally more sensible to house them in the Bronx. • A new facility maximizes these benefits and improves operational efficiency, lowering jail costs. • The Bronx Jail project could also provide community benefits and/or address unmet community needs. NYC Department of Correction: March 2009

  10. NYC DOC Community Releases to the Bronx, FY 2005 The new Bronx jail will allow DOC to house more Bronx inmates closer to their families and communities. Yet Bronx facilities currently have capacity for only 4% of individuals in DOC custody Bronx residents make up 21% of the City’s admissions. New Jail Site NYC Department of Correction: March 2009

  11. BRONX LOCATION To RIKERS ISLAND To New Bronx Jail Site Reduction in Travel Time Mott Haven (E. 138th Street and 3rd Avenue) 1 hour, 14 minutes (2 trains, 2 buses) 36 minutes (1 train, 1 bus) -51% Hunts Point (Hunts Point Ave and Bryant Ave) 1 hour, 29 minutes (2 trains, 2 buses) 17 minutes (1 bus) -81% Melrose (The Hub; 3rd avenue and 149th street) 1 hour, 10 minutes (1 train, 2 buses) 40 minutes (1 train, 1 bus) -43% East Tremont (E. Tremont Ave and Boston Road) 1 hour, 21 minutes (3 trains, 1 bus) 43 minutes (1 train, 1 bus) -47% Grand Concourse/Yankee Stadium (E. 161st street and Grand Concourse) 1 hour, 10 minutes (2 trains, 1 bus) 39 minutes (1 bus) -44% The new Jails will provide speedier access and visitation for families, lawyers, and community-based service providers On average, the new Bronx jail site is 53% closer to many Bronx communities than Rikers Island. • Family involvement while in jail helps people stay out after jail. • Good social services in jail and after help people stay out of jail. • Rikers Island is difficult to access • Brooklyn families will experience similar travel time savings. NYC Department of Correction: March 2009

  12. Borough Jail Plan:Current Status • Brooklyn: the jail is open and operating with 32 resident inmates and approximately 400 inmates going to and from court daily. • The contract for the design of the Brooklyn House addition is now with the Comptroller. When the contract is registered, DOC will work with the architects to prepare the environmental review documents. • DOC will obtain all necessary approvals before beginning construction. • The Bronx: DOC working with DDC and its consultant to prepare the environmental review documents for the new jail in the Bronx. • Scoping documents should be issued and a scoping hearing scheduled next month. • Expect to commence the ULURP process by the end of the calendar year. NYC Department of Correction: March 2009