Theatre in the Golden Age of Athens - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

lev
theatre in the golden age of athens n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Theatre in the Golden Age of Athens PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Theatre in the Golden Age of Athens

play fullscreen
1 / 16
Download Presentation
Theatre in the Golden Age of Athens
122 Views
Download Presentation

Theatre in the Golden Age of Athens

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Theatre in the Golden Age of Athens By Melinda Neale Greek theatre at Epidaurus

  2. Beginnings • Greek theatre history began with festivals honoring the Gods, specifically Dionysus. • God of wine and fertility. • Men would perform dialogues of song and dance to welcome Dionysus.

  3. Stage Setup • Theatrical performances were held in large open air structures with a distinct setup. • They were originally made to hold religious ceremonies but as theatre became more important, the religious aspects dwindled. • Consists of Orchestra, Skene and Audience

  4. Orchestra • Circular performance space • Located in front of Proscenium • Elevated platform where backdrops were hung and actors performed • “Dancing Place” • Entry ways called parados

  5. Skene • “Tent” or “hut” located behind proscenium • Retangular in shape • Backstage area where actors changed • Also served to represent play’s location • Usually set in house or palace

  6. Audience • Rising from orchestra • Also called koilon • Semi-circle shape • People sat on tiers of benches • Built up side of hill • Aided in acoustics • Divided in 2 diazoma • Upper and lower • Front seats called proedria • Reserved for officials and priests

  7. Actors • Always males • Approximately 1-3 actors per play • Wore different masks to represent different characters • Usually made of linen, wood or leather • Human and animal hair also used • Most important part of costume • Protagonist were played by members of society with great levels of respect • Well paid

  8. Chorus • Sang narration of the play • Also wore masks • Different from actors • 12-15 members • Considered “mouthpiece of society and morality” • Suffered along with heroes • Very active part of play

  9. Structure of Plays • Prologue: Spoken by 1 or 2 characters prior to appearance of chorus. Usually provides background story for performance. • Parodos: First song sung by chorus upon entering orchestra. Accompanied by dance. • Episodes: Acts of play • Stasimon: Ode and dance performed by chorus at end of each episode. Reflects on what audience has just seen • Exodos: End of play. Processional song which often provided words of wisdom to audience.

  10. Theatrical Forms • Tragedy • Comedy • Satyr

  11. Tragedy • Based on conflict • Tensions at work: • Murder and Revenge • Crime and Retribution • Pride and Humility • Courage and Cowardess • Explores physical and moral depths to which human life can descend • Subject was typical death, and lessons living can learn from the dead • Focused on friction between individual and community • Will of the Gods • Conflicts manifests itself in flaw (weakness) of protagonist • Brings character in conflict • Tragedy is most well known form of Greek Theatre

  12. Playwrights of Greek Tragedy • Sophocles • Oedipus Rex • Electra • Eurpides • Medea • Bacchae • Aeschylus • Prometheus Bound

  13. Comedy • Amusing/light-hearted play • Designed to make audience laugh • Freely ridiculed public figures and Gods • Foreigners and women particular subjects • Most knowledge comes from vase paintings and plays written by Aristophanes • Only 11 out of 44 fully remain

  14. Satyr • Deliberate absurdity • Based on Greek mythology • Mock drunkenness • Bad sexuality • Pranks and gags • Generally had aspects of tragedy • Solemnity of tragedy noticeably absent • Amusing effects • Didn’t depend on action (like comedy) • Depended on how chorus played off action