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WELCOME TO MIGRANT 101 PowerPoint Presentation
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WELCOME TO MIGRANT 101

WELCOME TO MIGRANT 101

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WELCOME TO MIGRANT 101

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  1. WELCOME TO MIGRANT 101 Presented by Georgia’s Regional Migrant Office Coordinators Alice Matthews Margarita Muñoz Israel Cortez

  2. GEORGIA’S MIGRANT EDUCATION PROGRAM SERVICE AREAS Region 2- Israel Cortez Southern Pine Migrant Education Agency Coordinator Georgia Department of Education 221 N. Robinson St., Lenox, GA 31637 (229) 546-3249 Office (866 ) 505-3182 Toll-Free (404) 272-8780 Cell (229) 546-3251 Fax jcortez@doe.k12.ga.us John Wight, Program Manager 1854 Twin Towers East - 205 Jesse Hill Jr. DriveAtlanta, GA 30334(404) 463-1857 - Office(404) 821-9741 - Cell(770) 408-4202 - Faxjwight@doe.k12.ga.us Region 3- Alice Matthews Piedmont Migrant Education Agency Coordinator Georgia Department of Education 1414 Twin Towers West- 205 Jesse Hill Jr. Drive SE Atlanta, GA 30334 (404) 232-1677 Office (800) 648-0892 Toll-Free (404) 272-5622 Cell almatthews@doe.k12.ga.us Region 1- Margarita Muñoz Live Oak Migrant Education Agency Coordinator Georgia Department of Education 201 West Lee St., Brooklet, GA 30415 (912) 842-5400 Office (800) 621-5217 Toll-Free (404) 272-8762 Cell (912) 842-5440 Fax mmunoz@doe.k12.ga.us

  3. TOPICS FOR TODAY • Program Support: The Who and What of Migrant Education (Federal, • State and Regional Support Staff Roles and Goals) • Identification and Recruitment • Pro-Active Program Planning: Comprehensive Needs Assessment, Supplemental Services, Implementation Plans, and the Budget • Parents Want to Know and Help: • Parent Advisory Council Meeting Basics • Data, Evaluation, the Forms, and the Migrant Portal: Documentation Doesn’t Have to Be a Bad Word … Document Success!

  4. The purpose of the MEP in Georgia (and the United States) is to ensure that migrant children fully benefit from the same free public education provided to all children and that the unmet education-related needs resulting from their migrant lifestyle are met. 2012 Georgia Title I Conference Matthews, Munoz, and Cortez

  5. GEORGIA MIGRANT EDUCATION PROGRAM FOUR (4) GOAL AREAS Goal 1: Migrant students in grades 4 through 8 will improve CRCT scores in reading/English language arts and math. Goal 2: Migrant students in grades 9 through 12 will improve End of Course Test, Georgia High School Graduation Test, and Georgia High School Writing Test outcomes, ultimately increasing the graduation rate.

  6. GEORGIA MIGRANT EDUCATION PROGRAM FOUR (4) GOAL AREAS • Goal 3: The Georgia Migrant Education Program will add to the current number of educational and/or healthcare opportunities for migrant OSY by identifying or developing five additional new opportunities over the next three years. • Goal 4: The Georgia Migrant Education Program will add to the current number of educational opportunities that will promote school readiness and parental engagement by developing or identifying five additional new educational opportunities over the next three years.

  7. Georgia Migrant Education Program’s Three Service Areas Region 3 Region 1 Region 2

  8. GA MIGRANT EDUCATION PROGRAM 3 Regional Offices 70 Direct - Funded Districts 9,448 Students 110 Consortium Districts

  9. Migrant Students: Multiple Risk Factors for Becoming a Drop-Out

  10. WHAT IS THE ROLE OF THE LOCAL MIGRANT EDUCATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION & STAFF? • Attend Technical Assistance Regional/State Workshops (three are mandatory); throughout the year to stay up-to-date, plus to form/renew collaborative efforts with other districts; • Identify and recruit new migrant participants in an ongoing process and re-sign previous students at the beginning of the academic year, plus complete/review Certificates of Eligibility (COEs); • Involve migrant parents as often as possible (Parent Advisory Council (PAC), Planning Committees, Comprehensive Needs Assessment (CNA) and Other School/Community Events);

  11. WHAT IS THE ROLE OF THE LOCAL MIGRANT EDUCATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION & STAFF? • Conduct a CNA and then create Implementation Plans (IPs) to address the needs; Evaluate the impact of the IPs on students and achievement; • Prioritize service for Priority for Service (PFS) students (Identify students and complete paperwork in timely manner); • Provide academic and support services as needed through the IPs and maintain thorough records (student service calendars) to support the Supplemental Service Spreadsheet;

  12. WHAT IS THE ROLE OF THE LOCAL MIGRANT EDUCATION PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION & STAFF? • Review and correct Current Enrollment Reports, Complete Change of Information Forms, and Departure Forms (when a student moves out of a school system); • Be mindful of the budget (draw-downs in timely manner, supplement vs. supplant, plus all expenditures must be reasonable, necessary, allocable to the grant & supplemental); • Prep for monitoring (on-site & self); and • DOCUMENT, DOCUMENT, DOCUMENT

  13. IDENTIFICATION AND RECRUITMENT Regional Recruiters train and assist district staff to identify and recruit eligible migrant families. This includes the completion of Certificates of Eligibility (COEs). Families are deemed eligible when they meet a specific set of criteria and the COE has been signed all they way through to the Regional Coordinator or State ID&R Coordinator. Migrant staff from each school district attend mandatory training sessions three times per year to attain or maintain ID&R proficiency levels.

  14. MIGRANT EDUCATION PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL SERVICES • Supplemental Instruction/Tutoring (e.g., inclusion, after school, summer) • Local After-School Programs (Collaboration and 100% migrant) • Migrant Head Start (e.g., Kiddie Kastle) • Early Childhood Development (preschool instruction at home or school) • Adolescent Outreach and Career Counseling • Educational Summer Programs for Middle & High School Students (Summer Leadership Academy at ABAC, UGA Leadership Without Limits, Close-Up) • Local Migrant Summer School (may include Pre-K, academic and enrichment programs) • Referrals to ABAC HEP/CAMP Programs (High School Equivalency Program/College Assistance Migrant Program) • Categorical Qualification for Free & Reduced School Lunch

  15. SERVICE DELIVERY PLAN • Georgia’s Service Delivery Plan, published in June 2009, is based on the findings from the 2008 CNA. • State priorities, programs, and initiatives are designed in support of these findings. • LEAs set priorities, programs, and initiatives based on a local CNA, with an eye toward always following the state Service Delivery Plan.

  16. CONDUCTING A COMPREHENSIVE NEEDS ASSESSSMENT (CNA) Select an individual to lead the local CNA process; Conduct a migrant CNA meeting (can be part of another CNA meeting as long as migrant student needs are addresses separately); Invite the stakeholders; Develop a Migrant Student Profile that describes a typical migrant student in the district – Listed below are some suggested measures to include in the Migrant Student Profile: Priority for Services numbers and characteristics Age/grade distributions Gender Ethnic heritage Home language School enrollment, attendance, and exit trends English proficiency status • Mobility patterns • Geographic location • Reading and math achievement scores • Graduation rates • Participation in intervention programs • Participation in early childhood programs 2012 Georgia Title I Conference Matthews, Munoz, & Cortez

  17. DATA TO USE IN YOUR LOCAL CNA 2012 Georgia Title I Conference Matthews, Munoz, & Cortez

  18. WHAT TO DO WITH THE DATA IN YOUR NEEDS ASSESSMENT? Where do the “gaps” (between migrant students and non-migrant students) exist? Do they mirror the state’s? Prioritize the needs of migrant students in the system (don’t feel as though you must address every need identified – you should address the most important for your system). Make program-planning decisions based on “gap” information, always checking priorities against the state’s SDP. Use to guide the spending of migrant funds (budget). 2012 Georgia Title I Conference Matthews, Munoz, & Cortez

  19. SUPPLEMENT VS. SUPPLANT • The federal supplement, not supplant provision is intended to ensure that services provided under Title I, Part C are used to supplement (increase the level of services) and not supplant (replace) services that would otherwise be provided to participating migrant students with state and local funds if MEP funds were not available. • Any program activity required by state law, State Board of Education (SBOE) rule, or local board policy may not be funded with MEP funds. • State or local funds may not be decreased or diverted for other uses merely because of the availability of MEP funds. • The district must maintain documentation that clearly demonstrates the supplementary nature of MEP funds. This must include documentation that the activity, as well as the funds, are supplemental.

  20. SHOW ME THE MONEYAND OTHER STUFF WE NEED !!! The CNA helps prioritizethe needs of migrant children, because there are never enough resources (support services and money) to cover all needs.

  21. BEGIN WITH YOUR PRIORITY FOR SERVICE (PFS) STUDENTS The Migrant Education Program is mandated by Section 1304 (d) of NCLB to provide priority services to children who meet both of the following criteria: • Disrupted schooling (change in school district; > 10 days absent from school) • At risk of failing to meet academic content and achievement standards expected of all students (e.g., failing grades or overage for grade, ELL-LEP (ESOL), below proficiency on state-local assessments)

  22. IMPLEMENTATION PLANS WHO DO YOU PLAN TO SERVE? EXAMPLE: ELEMENTARY, AFTER-SCHOOL MATH TUTORING FOR 15 PFS AND 8 NON-PFS STUDENTS WHAT ARE THEIR NEEDS/GAPS? HOW DO YOU PLAN TO MEET THOSE NEEDS? WHAT ARE YOUR MEASURABLE GOALS? EXAMPLE: __% of all students who attend __% of the sessions will increase their scores on a teacher designed pre-post test by __%

  23. THE BUDGET PROCESS IMPLEMENTATION PLANS (IP) ARE THE DRIVING FORCE BEHIND BUDGETS • IPs should address educational projects for Pre-Schoolers, In-school students, Out-of-School Youth (OSY) & Drop Outs (DO). Rememberthat local programs have to represent local demographics. If 70% of migrant participants are OSY/Pre-K, the LEA should prioritize this group when planning services. • Funding is earned by all three categories.

  24. THE BUDGET PROCESS SPENDING THE MONEY Please remember that all expenditures must be reasonable, necessary, allocable to the grant & supplemental. When you are monitored, all purchase orders will be reviewed to see if they meet these 3 criteria and if they reflect the focus of your Implementation Plans.

  25. PARENTS WANT TO KNOW AND HELP INCLUSION FOR PARENTS Whenever possible, invite migrant parents to participate in all school activities, committees, and planning groups. The most effective communication is in the parents’ first language and provided in multiple methods (letters, phone calls, and home visits).

  26. GEORGIA MIGRANT PARENT INVOLVEMENTParent Advisory Council Meeting Basics

  27. GEORGIAPARENT ADVISORY COUNCIL MEETINGS 2012-2013 Regional PAC Meetings • Friday, September21, 2012 • Friday, January 25, 2013 • Friday, April19, 2013 State PAC Meetings • Saturday, October20, 2012 • Saturday, February 2, 2013 • Saturday, May 4, 2013

  28. MORE INFORMATION AND RESOURCES • GA DOE MEP website with links to other resources: http://public.doe.k12.ga.us/ci_iap_migrant.aspx • National Migrant Education Information & Resources: www.escort.org • Opportunities for Success for OSY: www.osymigrant.org • NCLB: required documents in multiple languages www.transact.com • U.S. Dept. of Education, Office of Migrant Education: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/oese/ome/index.html • Migrant Farmworkers Harvest of Hope Foundation: www.harvestofhope.net

  29. MIGRANT 101 SUMMARY IDENTIFY, RECRUIT AND SERVE

  30. REVIEW OF TOPICS FOR TODAY • Program Support: The Who and What of Migrant Education (Federal, State and Regional Support Staff Roles and Goals) • Identification and Recruitment • Pro-Active Program Planning: Comprehensive Needs Assessment, Supplemental Services, Implementation Plans, and the Budget • Parents Want to Know and Help • Parent Advisory Council Basics • Data, Evaluation, the Forms, and the Migrant Portal

  31. AVAILABLE MIGRANT PROGRAM TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE Resource Manuals (Data, ID&R, and Regional) Regional Workshops On-site Technical Assistance (Monitoring Prep & Programmatic) Cell/Office Phones, e-mail, Webinars, and Conference Calls State Conferences, Optional National Forums and Conferences

  32. QUESTIONS? Thank you for coming today… Alice, Margarita, and Israel Please Contact Your Regional Migrant Office For Further Assistance

  33. GEORGIA’S MIGRANT EDUCATION PROGRAM SERVICE AREAS Region 2- Israel Cortez Southern Pine Migrant Education Agency Coordinator Georgia Department of Education 221 N. Robinson St., Lenox, GA 31637 (229) 546-3249 Office (866 ) 505-3182 Toll-Free (404) 272-8780 Cell (229) 546-3251 Fax jcortez@doe.k12.ga.us John Wight, Program Manager 1854 Twin Towers East - 205 Jesse Hill Jr. DriveAtlanta, GA 30334(404) 463-1857 - Office(404) 821-9741 - Cell(770) 408-4202 - Faxjwight@doe.k12.ga.us Region 3- Alice Matthews Piedmont Migrant Education Agency Coordinator Georgia Department of Education 1414 Twin Towers West- 205 Jesse Hill Jr. Drive SE Atlanta, GA 30334 (404) 232-1677 Office (800) 648-0892 Toll-Free (404) 272-5622 Cell almatthews@doe.k12.ga.us Region 1- Margarita Muñoz Live Oak Migrant Education Agency Coordinator Georgia Department of Education 201 West Lee St., Brooklet, GA 30415 (912) 842-5400 Office (800) 621-5217 Toll-Free (404) 272-8762 Cell (912) 842-5440 Fax mmunoz@doe.k12.ga.us