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ELEVATING OUR FUTURE WORKFORCE

ELEVATING OUR FUTURE WORKFORCE

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ELEVATING OUR FUTURE WORKFORCE

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  1. ELEVATING OUR FUTURE WORKFORCE Minnesota Health & Housing Alliance March District Meeting

  2. MEMBERS REPORT BIGGEST CHALLENGES IN 2006-07 • Financial • Workforce • Regulatory • Transformation Source: 2007 MHHA Member Value Survey

  3. MEMBERS REPORT BIGGEST CHALLENGES IN 2006-07 • Staffing Issues (especially RN and CNA) • Recruiting Well-trained Staff • Retaining Staff (limited wages and benefits) Source: 2007 MHHA Member Value Survey

  4. NUMBER OF VACANT FTE POSITIONS IN CARE CENTERS Source: Long Term Care Imperative 2007 Legislative Survey

  5. ESTIMATED VACANT FTE POSITIONS IN CARE CENTERS Source: Long Term Care Imperative 2007 Legislative Survey

  6. PROJECTED POPULATION & WORKFORCE GROWTH Projected Growth in Workforce Projected Growth in the Population Age 60 and Over 2005-2025 Source: Minnesota State Demographic Center

  7. HEALTHCARE JOBS LEAD MINNESOTA’S FUTURE NEEDS Source: DEED, Employment Projections

  8. MINNESOTA HEALTHCARE CAREER TRENDS HISTORY

  9. PROJECTED GROWTH FOR TOP 15 HEALTHCARE OCCUPATIONS AGING SERVICES Source: MN Dept of Employment and Economic Development

  10. WHO PROVIDES CARE TO OLDER MINNESOTANS 1% drop in family caregiving = $30M in public funds. Minnesota Health & Housing Alliance – February 23, 2006 Source: Minnesota Department of Human Services

  11. RATIO OF CAREGIVERS TO OLDER ADULTS DROPPING Ratio of women 20-55 to people 85 and over Minnesota Health & Housing Alliance – February 23, 2005 Source: Minnesota State Demographer

  12. MINNESOTA BOSTS HIGH WORKFORCE PARTICIPATION

  13. NURSING SHORTAGE ONLY EXPECTED TO WORSEN

  14. A NURSING WORKFORCE APPROACHING RETIREMENT 46 45 Source: Minnesota Board of Nursing

  15. NURSING PROGRAMS GROW BUT DEMAND REMAINS HIGH The Minnesota State Colleges and University System (MNSCU) trains 78% of the state’s new nursing graduates 32 colleges and universities on 53 campuses in 46 communities

  16. MNSCU MISSION TO SUPPORT COMMUNITY NEEDS Between 2001 and 2005: 74% increase in nursing graduates! LPNs by 77% RNs by 69% Master’s prepared nurses by 150%

  17. AVERAGE HOURLY RN WAGES HOSPITALS vs CARE CENTERS Wage Gap Increased 57% in Five Years Gap=$11.49 Gap=$7.30 Source: MN Health Care Cost Information System, Long Term Care Imperative Compensation Survey

  18. AVERAGE HOURLY LPN WAGESHOSPITALS vs. CARE CENTERS Wage Gap Increased 113% in Five Years Gap = $0.77 Gap=$1.64 Source: MN Health Care Cost Information System, Long Term Care Imperative Compensation Survey

  19. AVERAGE HOURLY CNA WAGESHOSPITALS vs. CARE CENTERS Wage Gap Increased 91% in Five Years Gap=$3.47 Gap=$1.82 Source: MN Health Care Cost Information System, Long Term Care Imperative Compensation Survey

  20. PERCENT OF CARE CENTERS IN FINANCIAL CRISIS (Operating Margin of -5% or worse) Northwest 35.3% Northeast 50.0% East Central 19.4% West Central 34.6% Legend =<25% =26%-35% =35%-45% Metro 18.6% =>45% 30% of Facilities are in Crisis, 4% Higher than Last Year Southwest 30.0% Southeast 39.2% Source: Imperative Nursing Facility Survey Prepared by LarsonAllen

  21. Jobs at Risk: 3,227 Beds: 2,806 ALMOST 23,000 JOBS AT RISK DUE TO FINANCIAL CRISIS Jobs at Risk: 1,311 Beds: 1,615 Jobs at Risk: 2,142 Beds: 4,801 Jobs at Risk: 2,387 Beds: 3,000 Jobs at Risk: 5,854 Beds: 13,684 Jobs at Risk: 2,814 Beds: 4,078 Jobs at Risk: 5,007 Beds: 5,554

  22. THE INTEREST IS THERE! • Healthcare careers are the No. 1 choice for students leaving high school (not college-bound), and the third-highest path for those college-bound • 28% of current Minnesota high school students express interest in health occupations www.minnesotahosa.org

  23. INNOVATION IS OCCURING • Share the many changes in Care Centers • “Culture Change” helps bring focus to our core work and emphasize relationships • New relationships with and strategies for informal caregivers, volunteers (HCAM) and other non-traditional labor pools is vital

  24. INNOVATION IS OCCURING • Technology with the potential to revolutionize our missions • Pioneering design is transforming the spaces we live and work • Aging Services Careers – new job descriptions, responsibilities, training models, and opportunities for respect

  25. AGING SERVICESWORKFORCE INNOVATION: MHHA Workforce Solutions Council Drives Association Response

  26. TALENT

  27. WORKFORCE SOLUTIONS COUNCIL • Advance MHHA’s strategic initiative to “elevate the older adult services workforce of the future” • Focus on strategies for recruiting and inspiring talent in the field • Focus on retention strategies and best/promising practices in job satisfaction • Coordinate efforts with parallel initiatives

  28. CREATING SOLUTIONS

  29. CREATING SOLUTIONS • Career Exposure and Recruitment MHHA will explore the promotion of the many careers in older adult services to traditional and prospective employee audiences through a series of outreach initiatives and partnerships

  30. CREATING SOLUTIONS • Member Skill Building for Talent Retention MHHA will explore ways to maximize member knowledge through education, issue briefs and launch of an e-community clearinghouse focused on targeted workforce initiatives having the greatest impacts in the field

  31. CREATING SOLUTIONS • Launch of a New Employee Model MHHA will lead the creation and expansion of a new older adult services employee in Minnesota, facilitating development of provider knowledge, curriculum design, articulation and instructor agreements with higher education partners

  32. CREATING SOLUTIONS • Replication of New Training Models Breaking out of the bottleneck found in traditional higher education avenues, MHHA will explore alternative models for the training of key employee groups, with an emphasis in the field of nursing

  33. CREATING SOLUTIONS • Career Exposure and Recruitment • Member Skill Building for Talent Retention • Launch of a New Employee Model • Replication of New Training Models

  34. A NEW EMPLOYEE MODEL

  35. CHALLENGES • Identifying best/ promising practices in the field and emerging care delivery models • Providing standardizationandrecognition while allowing for customization • Developing new curriculum and articulation agreements with higher education • Identifying resources to lead efforts

  36. HEALTH SUPPORT SPECIALIST (HSS) • A pathway for organizations to move towards a “universal” worker model • Designed around a household model with self-leadteams

  37. HEALTH SUPPORT SPECIALIST (HSS) • Entry-level training program for newfrontline workers, taking into account the knowledge and training of existing staff • Theoretical instruction (386 hrs) combined with on-the-job learning (2500 hrs) • Customized to unique mission or other training curriculum for each organization

  38. A CLEAR CURRICULUM AND CAREER LADDER Health Support Specialist Employment and mentoring with a qualified journey worker from day one Entry Level

  39. ADVANCING THROUGH THE STEPS • Medical Terminology • Dietary Services (National Serv-Saf Certification) • Environmental Services (OSHA 10-hour industry card)

  40. ADVANCING THROUGH THE STEPS • CPR and First Aid Certificate • Advanced Dementia Care Certificate (Alzheimer’s Association) • Culture Change Certificate • Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) (Facility, Technical or Community College)

  41. ADVANCING THROUGH THE STEPS • Rehabilitative Aid (Facility Certificate) • Certified Medication Aid (Technical or Community College) Health Support Specialist Apprentices Advanced Health Support Specialist

  42. ADVANCING TO “JOURNEY WORKER” • Completion of all career ladder steps (Including on the job learning hours) • Completion of all facility requirements (Set by each organization) • Registered Apprenticeship Certificate through Program Sponsor (MHHA)

  43. HEALTH SUPPORT SPECIALIST (HSS) “The Registered Apprentice program has helped me to broaden my knowledge base to be able to serve our residents better.” Jennifer Steinkuhler Health Support Specialist Brewster Place, KA

  44. HEALTH SUPPORT SPECIALIST (HSS) • Kansas Registered Apprenticeship program • Development of curriculum, online distance education, funding sources • Grant awarded Jan. 1, 2007 to replicate • Recognized by US Department of Labor

  45. US DEPT. OF LABOR

  46. HEALTH SUPPORT SPECIALIST (HSS)

  47. FUNDING SOURCES • MHHA Foundation • CBJTG grant through Kansas • Workforce Investment Act (WIA) • Pell grants • Veterans assistance • Minnesota Scholarship Programs • Other special funding projects

  48. HEALTH SUPPORT SPECIALIST (HSS) Patricia Williams began her career in dietary services 13 years ago.

  49. HEALTH SUPPORT SPECIALIST (HSS) “Brewster Place encouraged me to go into the program to become more involved with resident care.

  50. HEALTH SUPPORT SPECIALIST (HSS) “It gave me the will to continue my education – put the learning bug in me.”