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One of America’s best-known culinary figures isn’t a real person at all; she was created in 1921 by the company that would later become General Mills. This figurehead had a radio show and has updated her look several times. Who is she?. Martha Stewart Betty Crocker Sara Lee Aunt Jemima.

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martha stewart betty crocker sara lee aunt jemima

One of America’s best-known culinary figures isn’t a real person at all; she was created in 1921 by the company that would later become General Mills. This figurehead had a radio show and has updated her look several times. Who is she?

Martha Stewart

Betty Crocker

Sara Lee

Aunt Jemima

the golden arches fatburger white castle jack in the box

Among the earliest fast-food hamburger chains was this Kansas establishment, which opened in 1921. Its name described the shape of its building.

The Golden Arches

Fatburger

White Castle

Jack in the Box

tang an instant orange juice that hit supermarket in shelves in 1959 became popular when it

Tang, an instant orange “juice” that hit supermarket in shelves in 1959, became popular when it:

Was served with airplane breakfasts

Was approved by the FDA

Went to the moon.

Was included in school lunches

slide4

In 1985, the Coca-Cola Company made a Major formula change, but disappointed consumers didn’t “Catch the Wave”, as the new slogan suggested. The change was:

Adding calories to Diet Coke

Removing the trace of cocaine that was in the original formula

Reducing the amount of caffeine

Introducing New Coke

belgian waffles ice cream sandwiches ice cream cones crepes suzette

Ernest Hamwi is credited with an invention conceived at the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904. As the story goes, an ice cream vendor ran out of cups, and Hamwi came to the rescue, using his thin pastries to make:

Belgian waffles

Ice cream sandwiches

Ice cream cones

Crepes suzette

fettuccine alfredo gnocchi spaghetti os pasta marinara

Which pasta dish was invented in Rome in 1914 and later became famous when honeymooners Douglas Fairbanks and Mary Pickford frequented the restaurant where it was created?

Fettuccine Alfredo

Gnocchi

Spaghetti Os

Pasta Marinara

chapter one
Chapter One

Welcome to the Restaurant and foodservice industry!

Prostart year 1

overview of foodservice and restaurant industry
Overview of Foodservice and Restaurant Industry

$550 billion dollars annually

More than 945,000 foodservice and restaurant operators

More than 13 million people employed (9% of the job market)

the restaurant and food service industry

Restaurants

    • Quick Service (Fast Food)
    • Fine-Dining
    • Casual
    • Theme Restaurants
    • Buffets
    • Cafeterias
  • Catering & Banquets
    • Menu chosen by host of the event
    • Caterers may have their own facility or cater off-site
    • Off-site catering involves preparing the food in one location and taking it to the event location
  • Retail
    • Eaten in the store or taken home
    • Grocery stores, Convenience stores, specialty shops
    • Vending Machines
  • Stadiums:
    • Food in stands to luxury suites
  • Airline and Cruise Ships
    • Airlines offer snacks to 7-course meals on transatlantic flights
    • Cruise ships offer food 24/7 ranging from quick-service to elegant fine-dining
The Restaurant and Food Service Industry

Commercial Restaurant & Foodservice Segment

Noncommercial Foodservice Segment

the restaurant and food service industry1

Schools and Universities

    • Provide on-campus food services to students and staff
  • Military Bases and ships
    • Provide food services to personnel
    • Also offered at clubs; i.e. Officers Club
  • Healthcare
    • Hospitals, long-term range care offer foodservices
  • Business and Industries
    • Convenience to employers
    • Benefit to employees in manufacturing or service industries
  • Clubs and Member-based facilities
    • Includes golf clubs, city, alumni, and athletic clubs
    • Offered as a convenience to its members
    • Brings in additional revenue
  • Business done in two ways
    • Contract Feeding
    • Self-Operators
The Restaurant and Food Service Industry

Commercial Restaurant & Foodservice Segment

Noncommercial Foodservice Segment

the big picture the hospitality industry

Average sales over $1 million dollars

  • Travel and Tourism definition
    • The combination of all of the services that people need and will pay for when they are away from home
  • Tourism defined
    • Travel for recreational, leisure, or business purposes
  • In 2005, tourism was the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd largest employer in 29 states
    • 7.3 Million people to take care of 1.19 billion trips took within the United States
The BIG Picture: The Hospitality Industry

Travel and Tourism

Transportation

Hospitality

the big picture the hospitality industry1

Hospitality is defined as

    • The services that people use and receive when they are away from home
  • Three Segments of Hospitality
  • Foodservice
    • Hotels
    • Restaurants
    • Retail Establishments
  • Lodging
    • Hotels
    • Motels
    • Resorts
  • Event Management
    • Stadiums
    • Expositions
    • Trade shows
The BIG Picture: The Hospitality Industry

Travel and Tourism

Transportation

Hospitality

the big picture the hospitality industry2

In the 1800s, the invention of the railroad help transport people faster to more places

    • By the 1920s-people traveled by car
    • 1950s- commercial airlines
  • Today's transportation
    • Airplanes
    • Trains
    • Charter services
    • Buses
    • Cars
    • Ships
The BIG Picture: The Hospitality Industry

Travel and Tourism

Transportation

Hospitality

the history of hospitality and foodservice

400 B.C. through 300 B.C.

Ancient Greece

  • Rarely dinned out
  • Got together socially for banquets, at private clubs and other establishments
    • Private clubs called “lesche (LES-kee)”
  • Meals were considered a time to nourish the soul and body
    • People ate while reclining on couches, listening to music, poetry and dancing

Ancient Rome

  • Settled around the Mediterranean Sea
  • Meals served in the home
  • Desired exotic foods and spices which increased trade
  • Rome became wealthy and spent money lavishing their friends and those in the lower social standing
The History of Hospitality and Foodservice

Ancient Greece and Rome(400BC-300BC)

The Middle Ages

Renaissance - French Revolution

Colonial North America

Industrial Revolution

The Gilded Age

The 20th Century

the history of hospitality and foodservice1

417 A.D.-1300 A.D.

  • People moved from a nomadic group of hunting and gathering to that of a farming community
    • This change was religion
  • Feudal society where landowners lived in relative comfort
    • Unlike the banquets of the Greeks and Romans, the medieval dinner had one purpose: to eat
  • Travel was extremely dangerous
  • The next 200 years, Europe was isolated from the rest of the world until 1095 A.D.
The History of Hospitality and Foodservice

Ancient Greece and Rome

The Middle Ages(417-1300)

Renaissance - French Revolution

Colonial North America

Industrial Revolution

The Gilded Age

The 20th Century

the history of hospitality and foodservice2

Renaissance 1500 A.D -1700 A.D.

  • French Revolution 1789 A.D.-1799 A.D.
  • The use of exotic spices increased the spice trade between Venice and India
  • Haute Cuisine was developed
  • Coffee houses introduced women to public establishments and made it appropriate to eat in public
  • Guilds in France were developed to increase the state’s control on the economy
    • Guilds could control their own specialties preventing others from making and selling the same items
    • Two cooking guilds were the “roasters” and “caterers”
  • 1765 the restorante was invented; origin of our modern word restaurant
  • After the French Revolution, within 30 years, Paris had over 500 restaurants.
The History of Hospitality and Foodservice

Ancient Greece and Rome

The Middle Ages

Renaissance - French Revolution(1500-1700; 1789-1799)

Colonial North America

Industrial Revolution

The Gilded Age

The 20th Century

the history of hospitality and foodservice3

1600-1700s

  • First colonist were city dwellers and not trained to farm
  • Boston and New York were centers of trade
  • 1634, Cole’s tavern in Boston opened
    • Offered food and lodging to travelers; hospitality industry is born
  • However, once colonists settled down they rarely traveled more than 25 miles from their home
The History of Hospitality and Foodservice

Ancient Greece and Rome

The Middle Ages

Renaissance - French Revolution

Colonial North America(1600-1700)

Industrial Revolution

The Gilded Age

The 20th Century

the history of hospitality and foodservice4

1750-1890s

  • Cottage Merchants-families that lived and worked together to make goods
    • Wool and linen for cloth
  • Factories sprouted up near large cities
    • Opened by orphan children; England outlawed such practice
    • Merchants turned back to farming
  • People migrated to cities to work at factories
    • Lead to overcrowding and unsanitary conditions
    • Horse and Buggy public transportation
  • Business hubs
    • Lodging
    • Dining for workers to go from work to lunch and work to dinner quickly
  • Railroad invention 1825
    • Inns, taverns, and foodservice facilities grew
The History of Hospitality and Foodservice

Ancient Greece and Rome

The Middle Ages

Renaissance - French Revolution

Colonial North America(1600-1700)

Industrial Revolution(1750-1890)

The Gilded Age

The 20th Century

the history of hospitality and foodservice5

1850-1890s

  • Enlightenment-scientific revolution
    • Concepts were measured in profit and production
    • Low pay for workers, BIG pay for industrial leaders
  • High society dined out in style
    • Restaurants with 18 course meals were not uncommon
  • Gold Rush of 1848
    • Those who struck rich wanted to experience the fine dining of high society
    • More fine restaurants quickly opened; yet most couldn’t stay afloat
  • Cafeterias opened to serve food quickly and cheap without servers
  • In the 1800s, the chef uniform was redesigned to white to symbolize cleanliness and different sizes of hats to show the ranks of chefs and cooks
The History of Hospitality and Foodservice

Ancient Greece and Rome

The Middle Ages

Renaissance - French Revolution

Colonial North America(1600-1700)

Industrial Revolution

The Gilded Age(1850-1890)

The 20th Century

the history of hospitality and foodservice6

1900-1999

  • More jobs meant more people eating out
  • The Great Depression of the 1930s
    • Hotels and restaurants started to close
    • Yet quick-service (Fast Food) restaurants were able to open
      • White Castle opened its doors in 1921
  • World War II
    • Lodging industry grew
    • After the war, 1940-1950 the quick-service industry grew rapidly
      • KFC and McDonalds opened its doors during World War II
  • The invention of the car made it possible for people to travel more and eat out at different places
  • 1958 brought in commercial airlines and foodservice in the sky
The History of Hospitality and Foodservice

Ancient Greece and Rome

The Middle Ages

Renaissance - French Revolution

Colonial North America(1600-1700)

Industrial Revolution

The Gilded Age

The 20th Century(1900-1999)

the 20 th century

Marie-Antoine Careme

    • Define the art of Grande Cuisine
    • Born to a poor family in France in 1784.
      • Abandoned as a child and found work as a kitchen boy, worked his way up through the kitchen
    • Noted for refined recipes and trained chefs
  • Georges August Escoffier
    • Refined Grand Cuisine into Classical Cuisine
    • 1898 Opened with Cesar Ritz, the London Savory Hotel
    • Categorized sauces into 5 grand (mother) sauces
      • Named dishes after famous people or events
    • Noted for his code of conduct and dress for kitchen staff
      • Kitchen Brigade system
The 20th Century

Famous Chefs

Marie-AntonieCareme

Georges August Escoffier

food service raitings
Food Service Raitings

Zagat Survey

Michelin Guide

  • Consumer Based
  • Rated on
    • Food
    • Décor
    • Service
    • Cost
  • In book form or on the Internet
  • http://www.zagat.com/locations
  • European starting in the US
  • Rated 1-3 stars on
    • Quality
    • Mastery of Flavors
    • Cooking Mastery
    • Personality of Cuisine
    • Value for Price
    • Consistency
    • http://www.michelintravel.com/michelin-guides/
how does foodservice work

Catering

    • Within hotels, independent companies and restaurants
How does Foodservice Work?

Catering

Retail

Stadiums

Convention Centers

National and State Parks

Theme Parks

Shopping

Monuments, Museums, and Zoos

how does foodservice work1

Retail

    • Restaurants in department stores, take-out sections in groceries
How does Foodservice Work?

Catering

Retail

Stadiums

Convention Centers

National and State Parks

Theme Parks

Shopping

Monuments, Museums, and Zoos

how does foodservice work2

Stadium

    • Large crowds, little time
    • Junk food to fine dining
How does Foodservice Work?

Catering

Retail

Stadiums

Convention Centers

National and State Parks

Theme Parks

Shopping

Monuments, Museums, and Zoos

how does foodservice work3

Convention Centers

    • A convention is a gathering of people who have something in common
    • Expositions (Expos) are large shows open to the public that highlight a particular type of product or service
    • Trade Shows are restricted to those that are involved in that industry being featured
How does Foodservice Work?

Catering

Retail

Stadiums

Convention Centers

National and State Parks

Theme Parks

Shopping

Monuments, Museums, and Zoos

how does foodservice work4

National and State Parks

    • Operated by the National Park Service
      • Yellowstone, Glacier, Sequoia, Everglades, Yosemite, Grand Canyon
    • Natural wonders, camping, hiking, boating, swimming
How does Foodservice Work?

Catering

Retail

Stadiums

Convention Centers

National and State Parks

Theme Parks

Shopping

Monuments, Museums, and Zoos

how does foodservice work5

Theme Parks

    • Exhibits, rides, and other attractions
    • Foodservice, lodging, and transportation
    • Sometimes national chains are featured inside the park (ex: McDonalds at Six Flags)
    • Fine Dining, Theme Restaurants
How does Foodservice Work?

Catering

Retail

Stadiums

Convention Centers

National and State Parks

Theme Parks

Shopping

Monuments, Museums, and Zoos

how does foodservice work6

Shopping

    • Malls and Outlet Malls
      • Quick Service – Casual Dining
    • Mall of America
      • 80+ food establishments
    • Department Stores
      • Cafes or full service
    • Discount Chains
      • Quick Service
How does Foodservice Work?

Catering

Retail

Stadiums

Convention Centers

National and State Parks

Theme Parks

Shopping

Monuments, Museums, and Zoos

how does foodservice work7

Monuments, Museums, and Zoos

    • Monuments
      • Concessions, restaurants
    • Museums
      • Fine Dining, cafeterias
    • Zoos
      • Variety of food service
How does Foodservice Work?

Catering

Retail

Stadiums

Convention Centers

National and State Parks

Theme Parks

Shopping

Monuments, Museums, and Zoos

how does foodservice work8

Additional Sectors:

    • Health Services
    • Schools and Universities
    • Military
    • Corrections
    • Lodging
How does Foodservice Work?

Catering

Retail

Stadiums

Convention Centers

National and State Parks

Theme Parks

Shopping

Monuments, Museums, and Zoos

foodservice careers
Foodservice Careers

Front-of-the-house

Back-of-the-house

Managers, assistant managers, banquet managers, maitre d’s, hostesses, bar staff, serving staff, busers.

Chefs, line cooks, pastry chefs, sous chef, dishwashers, menu planner, bookkeepers, dietitians.

what does the job entail
What does the job entail?

Manager

Server

Host/Hostess

Executive Chef

Sous Chef

Line Cook

why do people travel
LeisureWhy do people travel??

Business

Job related travel

Majority of guests for most hotels are on business

Work space, telephones, computer work stations, meeting rooms, comfortable beds

Consistency

Entertainment, education and adventure

Fun, shopping, dining, events, relaxing, family services, spa services, activities

Location is important

cultural and historic tourism
Cultural and Historic Tourism

Tours are available

Paris France, Washington D.C., Colonial Williamsburg, Beijing China

Learn about cultures – live among people

environmental tourism
Environmental Tourism

Natural Beauty

Photography, hiking, biking mountain climbing, camping, canoeing

Grand Canyon, Niagara Falls

recreational tourism
Recreational Tourism

Swim, lie in the sun, ski, play golf, play tennis, see shows, gamble

Vail Colorado, Las Vegas Nevada, Miami Florida

amenities
Amenities

Restaurants

Parking Garages

Boutiques

Barber shops

Dry Cleaners

Florists

Swimming pools

Room service

Cable Television

Pay per view

Bathrobes

Gift shops

Kitchens

Computer modems

Spa

Recreational activities

luxury properties
Luxury Properties

Top of the line, comfort & elegance

Spacious rooms, well decorated, luxurious extras

Ritz-Carlton & the Four Seasons

full service properties
Full Service Properties
  • Cater to travelers in search of a wide range of conveniences.
  • Larger rooms, well trained staff

Swimming pools,

room service fitness

centers, business

services

  • Hyatt and Westin
mid priced facilities
Mid-priced Facilities

Travelers who want comfortable, moderately priced accommodations.

On premise food and beverage service, simple décor.

Holiday Inn and Radisson

economy lodging
Economy Lodging

Clean, low priced accommodations, traveling salespeople, senior citizens and families with modest incomes.

Small staff, limited amenities, budget prices.

Motel 6 & Travelodge

all suite properties
All Suite Properties

Apartment style

Sitting area, dining area, small kitchen

Lots of room, especially for families

Marriott Suites & Comfort Suites

resorts
Resorts

Singles, families, couples, senior citizens

Golf, tennis, scuba, swimming

Destination – Mountains or Beach

Club Med and Disneyworld Resorts

bed and breakfasts
Bed and Breakfasts

Quaint, quiet accommodations with simple amenities.

Privately owned homes

Serves Breakfast

Owner usually lives on the property

hotel rating organizations
Hotel Rating Organizations

AAA

Mobil Travel

Guides

5 Diamond Rating

Management, staff, housekeeping, maintenance, room décor, furnishings, bathrooms, guest services, facilities, soundproofing, security, parking, exterior appearance.

5 Star Rating

Quality of building, furnishing, maintenance, housekeeping, overall service

star descriptions
Star Descriptions
  • Five Star Hotels:
    • These exceptional properties provide a memorableexperience through virtually flawless service and the finest of amenities. Staff areintuitive, engaging and passionate, and eagerly deliver service above and beyond theguests’ expectations. The hotel was designed with the guest’s comfort in mind, withparticular attention paid to craftsmanship and quality of product. A Five Star property is adestination unto itself.
  • Four Star Hotels:
    • These properties provide a distinctive setting, and the guestwill find many interesting and inviting elements to enjoy throughout the property.Attention to detail is prominent throughout the property, from design concept to qualityof products provided. Staff are accommodating and take pride in catering to the guest’sspecific needs throughout their stay.
  • Three Star Hotels:
    • These well-appointed establishments have enhanced amenities that provide travelers with a strong sense of location, whether for style or function. They may have a distinguishing style and ambience in both the public spaces and guest rooms; or they may be more focused on functionality, providing guests with easy access to local events, meetings or tourism highlights.
  • Two Star Hotels:
    • The Two Star hotel is considered a clean, comfortable and reliable establishment that has expanded amenities, such as a full-service restaurant.
  • One Star Hotels:
    • The One Star lodging is a limited-service hotel or inn that is considered a clean, comfortable and reliable establishment.
property management system
Property Management System

PMS software

Scheduling – rooms, spa services, restaurant reservations, event planning

Database Maintenance – guest preferences, vendor information, housekeeping records

Accounting and Sales – all financial transactions

Works with Expedia and Orbitz