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Response to Intervention for Positive Behaviour. Jean Bacon Positive Behaviour Support Consultant August 30, 2013 306-651-7304 jeanbacon@sasktel.net

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response to intervention for positive behaviour

Response to Intervention for Positive Behaviour

Jean Bacon

Positive Behaviour Support Consultant

August 30, 2013

306-651-7304 jeanbacon@sasktel.net

Based on the presentation: Responsiveness-to-Intervention & School-wide Positive behaviour Support (George Sugai, OSEP Center on PBIS, Center for behavioural Education and Research, University of Connecticut, 2008)

www.pbis.org www.cber.org

slide2

PURPOSE

Describe how response to intervention logic is represented in implementation of positive behavioural interventions & supports for EVERYONE in school.

  • RtI Context/Review
  • PBIS Basics
  • Applications & Examples
rti is an
RtI is an ….

approach or framework for redesigning & establishing teaching & learning environments that are effective, efficient, relevant, & durable for all students, families & educators.

  • NOT program, curriculum, strategy, intervention
  • NOT limited to special education
  • NOT new
slide6

Individual/Intensive Prevention & Intervention

Specialized

Individualized

Systems for Students with Intensive Needs

CONTINUUM OF

SCHOOL-WIDE

Academic &

Behaviour

SUPPORT

FEW

~5%

~15%

SOME

Targeted Prevention & Intervention:

Specialized Group

Systems for Students who are At-Risk

Univeral Prevention:

School-/Classroom-

Wide Systems for

All Students,

Staff, & Settings

ALL

~80% of Students

Academics and Social Behaviour

slide8

Review

Status and

Identify

Problems

Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Model

Develop and

Refine

Hypotheses

Evaluate and

Revise

Action Plan

Collect

and Use

Data

Discuss and

Select

Solutions

Develop and

Implement

Action Plan

Problem Solving Foundations

Horner & Todd

slide9

RTI

Continuum of Support for ALL

Few

Some

All

Dec 7, 2007

141 days
“141 Days!”

Intermediate/senior high school with 880 students reported over 5,100 office discipline referrals in one academic year. Nearly 2/3 of students have received at least one office discipline referral.

slide13

5,100 referrals =

76,500 min @15 min =

1,275 hrs =

159 days @ 8 hrs

big idea
BIG IDEA

Successful individual student behaviour support is linked to host environments or school climates that are effective, efficient, relevant, durable, & scalable.

(Zins & Ponti, 1990)

a canadian example
A Canadian Example

Ecole Central Middle School (CMS) AB implemented Bully Prevention – Positive Behaviour Support with a School-Wide PBS Approach.

  • Implementation of the school-wide approach at the beginning of the 2007-08 school year.
  • Implementation of Bully Prevention during the rest of that school year.
  • Students were included in each step of the implementation and contributed to the program by presenting to other students.
  • The year after, total problem behaviours decreased by 41%.

Promising Practices, Volume 3, Issue 1 Kelm/McIntosh

slide16

Staff Survey1. Have you noticed improved behaviours of students since we started PBIS?2. Do students know what the 3 behaviour expectations are?3. Do you think the PBIS lessons help students learn how to behave?

Promising Practices, Volume 3, Issue 1 Kelm/McIntosh

Ross & Horner, 2012

slide17

Integrated

Elements

Supporting Social Competence &

Academic Achievement

OUTCOMES

Supporting

Decision

Making

Supporting

Staff behaviour

DATA

SYSTEMS

PRACTICES

Supporting

Student behaviour

slide18

Four Integrated

Elements

Supporting Social Competence &

Academic Achievement

OUTCOMES

Supporting

Decision

Making

Supporting

Staff Behaviour

DATA

SYSTEMS

PRACTICES

Cultural/Contextual Sensitivity

Supporting Student Behaviour

(Sugai, 2011)

cultural contextual sensitivity
Cultural/Contextual Sensitivity
  • Is ensured through the use of processes that engage students, families, and communities to create practices that meet the diverse needs of specific students and their families.
  • Includes sensitivity to issues related to culture, gender, appearance, sexual orientation, abilities, and/or language.

(Sugai, 2011)

general implementation process
GENERAL IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS

Team

Agreements

  • School-wide agreements
  • District investment
  • 3-4 year training commitment
  • Local coordination, coaching, & evaluation

Data-based

Action Plan

Evaluation

Implementation

slide22

Sample Teaming Matrix

Are outcomes measurable?

what do we know about preventing violence
WHAT DO WE KNOW ABOUT PREVENTING VIOLENCE?
  • Surgeon General’s Report on Youth Violence (2001)
  • Coordinated Social Emotional & Learning (Greenberg et al., 2003)
  • Center for Study & Prevention of Violence (2006)
  • White House Conference on School Violence (2006)
  • Positive, predictable school-wide climate
  • High rates of academic & socialsuccess
  • Formal social skills instruction
  • Positive active supervision & reinforcement
  • Positive adult role models
  • Multi-component, multi-year school-family-community effort
slide24

SWPBS

Practices

School-wide

Classroom

  • Smallest #
  • Evidence-based
  • Biggest, durable effect

Family

Non-classroom

Student

slide25

A strategy designed to pro-actively:

    • Explicitly teach the students, regardless of their age, what we want them to know and do; and,
    • Reinforce their positive display of the behaviour, ensuring that the reinforcers are important from the view of the students, not the adults.
    • A Cool Tool
    • I do … We do … You do

(Scott, 2003)

reinforcement

SYSTEM

REINFORCEMENT
  • Cool Tool for Teaching a Procedure (Norm)
  • Procedure: What to do when another person is talking to the class.
  • What is taught:When others are talking to the whole class, we close our mouths and wait our turn to speak. We raise our hand so the teacher will know we want to say something.
  • How the rule is taught: A Cool Tool
  • Talk about the need for the rule.
  • Role play a non-example with another adult.
  • Role play a positive example with another adult or a student
  • Explain what will happen when positive examples of the rule are observed (e.g., Beans in a Bean Jar, Caught-You-Being-Good ticket, etc.)

(Scott, 2003)

Terry Scott, April 2008

reinforcement1

SYSTEM

REINFORCEMENT
  • Teaching a Procedure
  • How the rule is encouraged:
  • Before group discussions, remind students of the rule.
  • Stand near students who struggle with the rule.
  • 3. Compliment students who are following the rule.

(Scott, 2003)

Terry Scott, April 2008

slide28

School-wide

  • Leadership team
  • behaviour purpose statement
  • Set of positive expectations & behaviours
  • Procedures for teaching SW & classroom-wide expected behaviour
  • Continuum of procedures for encouraging expected behaviour
  • Continuum of procedures for discouraging rule violations
  • Procedures for on-going data-based monitoring & evaluation
slide29

2. NATURAL CONTEXT

1. SOCIAL SKILL

Expectations

3. behaviour EXAMPLES

slide30

Pre

Post

bernard elementary chilliwack school district positive behaviour support program
Bernard ElementaryChilliwack School DistrictPositive Behaviour Support Program

BC PBS Website, July 2012

slide35

School Rules

NOOutside Food

NOWeapons

NOBackpacks

NODrugs

NOBullying

slide38

Non-classroom

  • Positive expectations & routines taught & encouraged
  • Active supervision by all staff
    • Scan, move, interact
  • Precorrections & reminders
  • Positive reinforcement
define expectations by setting
Define Expectations by Setting
  • Transform broad school-wide expectations into specific, observable actions
  • Clear examples of what is and what is not expected
  • Take care in defining culturally responsive expectations

BC PBS Website, July 2012

slide41

Classroom

  • Classroom-wide positive expectations taught & encouraged
  • Teaching classroom routines & cuestaught & encouraged
  • Ratio of 6-8 positive to 1 negative adult-student interaction
  • Active supervision
  • Redirections for minor, infrequent behaviour errors
  • Frequent precorrections for chronic errors
  • Effective academic instruction & curriculum
slide43

1. SOCIAL SKILL

2. NATURAL CONTEXT

3. behaviour EXAMPLES

five components of self regulation baumeister vohs 2004
Five Components of Self-Regulation (Baumeister & Vohs, 2004)
  • Regulation of Arousal – The ability to attain, maintain, and change one’s level of arousal appropriately for a task or situation.
  • Emotional Regulation – The ability to control’s one’s emotion.
  • Behavioral Regulation – The ability to formulate a goal, monitor goal progress, & adjust one’s behaviors.
  • Social & Co-Regulation - The ability to manage social interactions, to co-regulate.
  • Academic self-regulation – To be aware of one’s academic strengths and weaknesses, and have a repertoire of strategies to tackle day to day challenges of academic tasks

- Louise Burridge & Brenda Whittam-Neary, SK Ministry of Education 2012

components of the classroom environment
Components of the Classroom Environment

- Louise Burridge & Brenda Whittam-Neary, SK Ministry of Education 2012

slide46

Family

  • Continuum of positive behaviour support for all families
  • Frequent, regular positive contacts, communications, & acknowledgements
  • Formal & active participation & involvement as equal partner
  • Access to system of integrated school & community resources
slide47

1. SOCIAL SKILL

2. NATURAL CONTEXT

Expectations

3. behaviour EXAMPLES

city rewards youths for following the law

YORKTON

Regina Leader-Post – February 4, 2009

City rewards youths for following the law
  • “The city of Yorkton is the only place in Saskatchewan where young people can be ticketed for following the law … the only city in the province implementing the Positive Ticketing program.”
  • “A lot of time we focus on the 2% of young people who may be getting into trouble and we don’t focus on the 98% that are doing really good things.” (Andrew Sedley, Health Promotion coordinator for the Sunrise HR.)
  • Richmond BC was one of the first cities to implement it and after 3 years … youth crime had decreased by 41%.
  • Yorkton looked at this as a way to build better relationships with
  • youth as well as reduce crime in the city.
slide49

Individual Student

  • Behavioural competence at school & district levels
  • Function-based behaviour support planning
  • Team- & data-based decision making
  • Comprehensive person-centered planning & wraparound processes
  • Targeted social skills & self-management instruction
  • Individualized instructional & curricular accommodations
slide50

4 Integrated

Elements

of PBIS

Social Competence,

Academic Achievement, and Safety

OUTCOMES

Supporting

Decision-

Making

Supporting

Staff Behaviour

DATA

SYSTEMS

Systems: Ways of organizing processes and procedures so everyone is on the same page and resources are used efficiently and effectively.

Practices, to the greatest extent possible, must be evidence-based; however, they must be adaptable to fit the local context (e.g., culture, community, demographics).

PRACTICES

Supporting

Student Behaviour

what does pbs look like
Universal

(SW-PBS or Primary)

>80% of students can tell you what is expected of them and give behavioral example because they have been taught, actively supervised, practiced, and acknowledged.

Positive adult-to-student interactions exceed negative.

Function-based behavior support is foundation for addressing problem behavior.

Data and team-based action planning and implementation are operating.

Administrators are active participants.

Full continuum of behavior support is available to all students.

Targeted and Intensive

(Secondary and Tertiary)

Team-based coordination and problem-solving occurs.

Local specialized behavioral capacity is built.

Function-based behavior support planning occurs.

Person-centered, contextually and culturally relevant supports are provided.

Division/Prvincial behavioral capacity is built.

Supports are instructionally oriented.

SW-PBS practices and systems are linked.

School-based comprehensive supports are implemented.

What Does PBS Look Like?
slide52

CONTINUUM of SWPBS

  • INTENSIVE PREVENTION & INTERVENTION
  • Function-based support
  • Wraparound/PCP
  • Special Education

Audit

Identify existing practices by tier

Specify outcome for each effort

Evaluate implementation accuracy & outcome effectiveness

Eliminate/integrate based on outcomes

Establish decision rules (RtI)

~5%

~15%

  • TARGETED PREVENTION & INTERVENTION
  • Check in/out
  • Targeted social skills instruction
  • Peer-based supports
  • Social skills club
  • UNIVERSAL PREVENTION
  • Teach & encourage positive SW expectations
  • Proactive SW discipline
  • Effective instruction
  • Parent engagement

~80% of Students

overview
Overview

Agreements

  • Values
  • Problem behaviours that are managed by the staff member only (minor) vs. problem behaviours managed by the staff member and the principal (major)
  • Processes for responding to problem behaviour
  • Processes for reinforcing expected behaviour
resources
Resources

Websites:

  • The website for the PBIS-SCP Canada Network (French and English)
    • http://pbisscpcanada.wordpress.com/pbis-scp-team/
  • British Columbia Positive Behaviour Support Website including the information for the Making Connections Conference
    • Richmond, BC November, 2013

First PBIS-SCP Canada Network Conference

    • bcpbs.wordpress.com
  • University of British Columbia Positive Behaviour Support website (includes the PBS newsletters “Promising Practices” among other resources)
    • promisingpractices.research.educ.ubc.ca

BC PBS Website, July 2013

resources1
Resources

Websites:

  • Technical Assistance Center for PBIS in Oregon
    • www.pbis.org
  • Maryland
    • http://www.pbismaryland.org/
  • Florida PBS
    • http://flpbs.fmhi.usf.edu/
  • Illinois PBIS
    • http://www.pbisillinois.org/
  • Technical Assistance Centre on Social Emotional Intervention for Young Children: Lots of great resources including the free download of the kit on display at the STF Summer Short Course
    • http://www.challengingbehavior.org/do/resources/teaching_tools/ttyc_toc.htm#turtle
  • Website for the Association for Positive Behavior Support
    • www.apbs.org

BC PBS Website, July 2013

slide56

Thank you! It’s Been a Treat!

www.pbis.orghttps://www.pbisapps.org/Applications/Pages/SWIS-Suite.aspx#swis

https://www.pbisapps.org/Pages/Default.aspx

Sugai etal., 2012