interdisciplinary writing unit n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Interdisciplinary Writing Unit PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Interdisciplinary Writing Unit

Loading in 2 Seconds...

  share
play fullscreen
1 / 28
leigh

Interdisciplinary Writing Unit - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

100 Views
Download Presentation
Interdisciplinary Writing Unit
An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author. While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Interdisciplinary Writing Unit by: Lindsey Lamb

  2. Introduction • Grade level: 1st grade • Genre: Informational • Form: Letter • Content Area: Social Studies • Topic: Historical figures in American history (Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson)

  3. Pre-assessment • Prompt: What do you want to be when you grow up and why? • Time: • 10 minutes (jotting down ideas) • 30 minutes (writing paper) • Student materials: • wide ruled notebook paper • 2 sharpened pencils with erasers

  4. Pre-assessment • Step-by-step directions • Today, we are going to begin working on informational writing. Before we do anything, I want to see how well you can write. This is not going to be counted as a test grade, however, it will count toward your daily grade. This means that I want you to do your absolute best, but remember to have fun writing. This writing will help me to learn more about you! • I am going to give you 10 minutes to think about and write down a few ideas. You also need to give me several reasons for what you want to be when you grow up. After the 10 minutes are up, you will then begin to write. The very first thing you need to do is to write your name and the date on your paper. I will give you 30 minutes to write on this topic. When you think that you are finished, it would be a good idea to reread your paper to make sure that you fully answered the questions. Once I tell you to begin, I will not be able to answer any questions. Remember, this is for me to see how well you can write. Please work quietly so that everyone is able to work with no distractions. Does anyone have any questions before you get started? Okay, you may begin!

  5. Instructional Grouping • Teacher’s instructional needs • For all writing process stages, instruction will be taught to students as a whole class. This will be most beneficial for the teacher and students. As a whole group, the amount of time on task is greatly improved. All students will hear the same explanations at the same time. If students have any questions, the teacher’s answer will clarify the answer to the question and possibly answer another student’s question. By hearing other students ask questions, the students are learning from one another. • For revisions and editing, students will work with a peer to look at each other’s letter. Again, students are learning from one another.

  6. Grouping • Students’ need based on developmental levels • For prewriting and drafting, students will work individually. These two stages are very important, because this is when the student forms their ideas and puts the information together. Students with emotional/behavioral disorders could be seated in the front of the class, so that they are closer to the teacher and are less likely to be distracted. When students are working individually, without distractions, they will be able to concentrate on their own work. In addition, students with emotional/ behavioral disorders need constant positive reinforcement for staying on task when he/she is working independently (Georgia Department of Education, 2005). • For revisions and editing, students will be paired with a peer to give feedback on each other’s letters and learn from each other. This is called pair talking (Rojas, 2007, p.385).

  7. Grouping • Students’ needs based on cultural/linguistic needs • For all stages of the writing process, the English language learner will work individually in the beginning to see what skills she can make improvement with on her own. By forcing her to do individual work, there is less chance of forming a learned helplessness attitude. The teacher will be there to prevent frustration from occurring. Then she can choose to use the pair talking strategy (Rojas, 2007, p.385). This partner work will benefit the student in a couple of ways. The student will be able to practice her English with a student who is fluent in both Spanish and English, and she will learn more about the writing process from her peer every step of the way.

  8. Prewriting • Informational writing is used to share and inform people about a specific topic. • It is important to choose your topic (what you are writing about)and audience (who you are writing to) before you begin to prewrite. • The form of writing we are going to do is a letter.

  9. Prewriting • Prewriting stage- fill out a graphic organizer • A graphic organizer allows you to make notes of important things about someone or something that you have learned about. • You DO NOT have to write in complete sentences or worry about spelling, capitalization, or punctuation.

  10. Prewriting

  11. Prewriting

  12. Prewriting

  13. Prewriting • Accommodations/Modifications for students with differing developmental levels • Children with emotional/behavioral disorders could be seated in the front of the class so that they are closer to the teacher and are able to concentrate better. By being placed in the front of the classroom, there is less chance for distraction. In addition, students with emotional/behavioral disorder need constant positive reinforcement for staying on task when he/she is working independently (Georgia Department of Education, 2005).

  14. Prewriting • Accommodations/Modifications for students with differing cultural/linguistic backgrounds • One student is an English Language Learner. She is able to understand English, but is not able to read or write in English. She will have a personal Spanish/English dictionary at all times throughout the writing process. In order to keep the flow and get her information together, she can write in Spanish. After she has gotten the information written down, it will be easier to translate into English. Reading materials could be read a few nights before the assignment so that the student can become familiarized with those resources. When reading different resource materials at school, she will be paired with a peer that is fluent in Spanish to confer (Rojas, 2007, p. 363).

  15. Drafting • Drafting is when you use your completed graphic organizer to help you put all your information together in an organized way. • You are going to begin to form your letter, so try your best to use complete sentences. • 5 parts to a friendly letter http://www.abcya.com/friendly_letter_maker.htm

  16. Drafting

  17. Revising • Stage where we will be rereading and developing further the ideas from our draft. • This stage involves adding, deleting, substituting, and rearranging words, phrase, and sentences. • DO NOT worry about spelling, capitalization, and punctuation in this stage. • Be sure to use a different color pen. This pen will be used for revisions ONLY!!

  18. Revising

  19. Revising

  20. Editing • Stage where you reread your letter and correct punctuation, capitalization, and spelling errors. • Be sure to use a different color pen. This pen will be used for revisions ONLY!! • A Few important rules: • capitalize names of people, because those people are important • capitalize the first word in a sentence • at the end of every sentence, you must put an ending mark such as a period or question mark

  21. Editing

  22. Editing

  23. Publishing • Stage where you write the final copy of your letter. • All errors should be corrected, so all you have to do is rewrite the letter very neatly!

  24. Publishing

  25. Publishing

  26. References Daniels. (n.d.). Editing marks. Retrieved from http://www.msdanielsden.com/html/editing_marks.html Georgia Department of Education. (2005). Supporting participation in typical classroom activities for students with disabilities through the use of accommodations, modifications, and assistive technology solutions. Retrieved from http://www.gpat.org Lamb, L. (2011). Informational drafting rubric. Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State University. Valdosta GA. Lamb, L. (2011). Informational editing rubric. Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State University. Valdosta GA. Lamb, L. (2011). Informational Prewriting Rubric. Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State University. Valdosta GA. Lamb, L. (2011). Informational prewriting scoring guide. Retrieved & modified from http://coefaculty.valdosta.edu/troot/read7140/Writing_Assessments.htm Lamb, L. (2011). My drafting checklist. Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State University. Valdosta Ga. Lamb, L. (2011). My informational editing checklist. Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State University. Valdosta GA.

  27. References Lamb, L .(2011). My informational publishing checklist. Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State University. Valdosta GA. Lamb, L. (2011). My informational revising checklist. Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State University. Valdosta GA. Lamb, L. (2011). My Prewriting Checklist. Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State University. Valdosta GA. Lamb, L. (2011). My writing graphic organizer. Unpublished manuscript. Valdosta State University. Valdosta GA. Lamb, L. (2011). Revising and editing: Proofreader’s marks. Retrieved from http://www.valdosta.edu/~troot/eced4300/revising_&_editing.htm Unknown. (2010). Computer lab: language arts- type a friendly letter. Retrieved from http://www.abcya.com/friendly_letter_maker.htm Rojas, V.P. (2007). Strategies for success with English language learners. Alexandria, VA: Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development. Tompkins, Gail E. (2008). Teaching writing: Balancing process and product (5th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall

  28. Class Activity: Drafting • Today, you are going to be writing a draft of your letter. • You need to have your graphic organizer on your desk, along with clean notebook paper and a pencil. • Remember, you are writing a letter to me (the teacher) to tell me all about your famous friend, Harriet Tubman.