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Moral purpose of leadership. Who’s who in leadership?. Levels of Leadership. Level 1 - Highly capable individual. This person makes productive contributions through his or her talent, knowledge, skills, and good work habits. Levels of Leadership.

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moral purpose of leadership

Moral purpose of leadership

Who’s who in leadership?

levels of leadership
Levels of Leadership
  • Level 1 - Highly capable individual. This person makes productive contributions through his or her talent, knowledge, skills, and good work habits.
levels of leadership3
Levels of Leadership
  • Level 2 - Contributing team member. This person makes productive contributions to the group for the overall achievement of group objectives and works effectively with others.
levels of leadership4
Levels of Leadership
  • Level 3 - Competent manager. This person can organize people and resources towards the effective and efficient pursuit of pre-planned objectives.
levels of leadership5
Levels of Leadership
  • Level 4 - Effective leader. This person sees the vision of the organization. He or she commits to it because of the urgency of the vision and is able to raise performance standards to a new level.
levels of leadership6
Levels of Leadership
  • Level 5 - Executive. This person builds greatness into the people and the organization by his or her humility and professional will.
levels of leadership7
Levels of Leadership
  • The level 5 leader builds greatness through discipline
    • Disciplined people
    • Disciplined thought
    • Disciplined action
culture of discipline
Culture of Discipline
  • Disciplined people - first WHO then WHAT.
culture of discipline9
Culture of Discipline.
  • Disciplined thought
    • Confront the brutal facts - but don’t lose hope
culture of discipline10
Culture of Discipline.
  • Disciplined thought
    • Hedgehog concept
      • What is your PASSION - your core values?
culture of discipline11
Culture of Discipline.
  • Disciplined thought
    • Hedgehog concept
      • What are you BEST - unique talents?
culture of discipline12
Culture of Discipline.
  • Disciplined thought
    • Hedgehog concept
      • What is your RESOURCE ENGINE - fuel that drives your superior performance?
culture of discipline13
Culture of Discipline
  • Disciplined action - create a culture of discipline.
culture of discipline14
Culture of Discipline.
  • “When you have disciplined people, you don’t need hierarchy. When you have disciplined thought, you don’t need bureaucracy. When you have disciplined action, you don’t need excessive controls”

(Fullan, 2003, p. 9)

self imposed roadblocks to school leadership
Self imposed roadblocks to school leadership
  • Skewed perceptions of limitations
    • Play it safe and avoid confrontation
    • Indifference
    • Unprepared for change
      • Teachers don’t want to change T/F?
      • System doesn’t want to change T/F?
self imposed roadblocks to school leadership16
Self imposed roadblocks to school leadership
  • “If only” blaming the system for school failures.
    • Dependence on the system to solve problems
    • If only I had ____ our problems would be solve attitude
    • Internal battle to change the context - you can’t grow roses in concrete.
self imposed roadblocks to school leadership17
Self imposed roadblocks to school leadership
  • Loss of moral compass
    • The loss of our original purpose leaves an emptiness in our job
    • Why am I here? What can I leave behind?
self imposed roadblocks to school leadership18
Self imposed roadblocks to school leadership
  • Not taking charge of one’s own development
    • Places of learning
    • People of learning
    • Culture of learning
    • Principal must be the lead learner
    • Role of the internet
self imposed roadblocks to school leadership19
Self imposed roadblocks to school leadership
  • The responsibility virus -This virus is the most powerful barrier to school leadership
    • Over responsibility - I don’t need you. I am responsible for success. CHARGE!
    • Under responsibility - It’s your responsibility. RETREAT!
    • Victimization attitude - someone else needs to help us - woe to us!
self imposed roadblocks to school leadership20
Self imposed roadblocks to school leadership
  • The Kurdish Virus- victimization attitude - someone else needs to help us - woe to us!
system imposed roadblocks to school leadership
System imposed roadblocks to school leadership
  • Over-centralization (control) vs.. Decentralization (chaos) - there is no recognition on the part of the government that the principal can mediate to solve problems independent of itself.
system imposed roadblocks to school leadership22
System imposed roadblocks to school leadership
  • The role of the principal is unknown. He must be able to lead a complex learning organization.
system imposed roadblocks to school leadership23
System imposed roadblocks to school leadership
  • System doesn’t support leadership development for the school’s leadership team - at all levels!
system imposed roadblocks to school leadership24
System imposed roadblocks to school leadership
  • Neglecting the legacy
    • Leaders are chosen for the wrong reasons and are expected to work miracles
    • What sustainable leadership are we leaving behind?
system imposed roadblocks to school leadership25
System imposed roadblocks to school leadership
  • Neglecting a system change strategy
    • Improving infrastructure
    • Increasing accountability
    • Multiple programs are not quick fixes, but rather a band aid on a bigger problem
system imposed roadblocks to school leadership26
System imposed roadblocks to school leadership
  • Neglecting a system change strategy
    • How does our strategy for change relate to student learning?
hierarchy of moral purpose
Hierarchy of moral purpose
  • “Moral purpose of the highest order is having a system where all the students learn, the gap between high and low performance becomes greatly reduced, and what people learn enables them to be successful citizens and workers in a morally based knowledge society”

(Fullan, 2003, p. 29)

hierarchy of moral purpose28
Hierarchy of moral purpose

Individual

School

Region

Society

hierarchy of moral purpose29
Hierarchy of moral purpose
  • Individual - caring for individuals, students, teachers is the starting point, but it is not enough to create a reaction for sustainable change
hierarchy of moral purpose30
Hierarchy of moral purpose
  • School - change can only occur when the principal creates a safe, trusting, supportive, and stable environment
hierarchy of moral purpose31
Hierarchy of moral purpose
  • Strong cultures are produced by relational trust that works inside and outside the school to produce results
hierarchy of moral purpose32
Hierarchy of moral purpose
  • Builds confidence in staff so that they can tackle new and uncertain issues
hierarchy of moral purpose33
Hierarchy of moral purpose
  • Encourages joint problem solving among teachers (takes time)
hierarchy of moral purpose34
Hierarchy of moral purpose
  • Mutual support and rewards for teaching beyond the book
hierarchy of moral purpose35
Hierarchy of moral purpose
  • Trust becomes a moral resource for the long term process of reform that demands sustained adult effort to maintain the vision and purpose of the school
nine improvement strategies of high performing high poverty schools in texas
Nine improvement strategies of high performing-high poverty schools in Texas
  • Setting high expectations for all students
  • Sharing leadership and staying engaged
  • Encouraging collaboration among staff
  • Using assessment data to support student success
nine improvement strategies of high performing high poverty schools in texas37
Nine improvement strategies of high performing-high poverty schools in Texas
  • Keep the focus on students
  • Address barriers to learning
  • Reinforce classroom learning at home by engaging families
nine improvement strategies of high performing high poverty schools in texas38
Nine improvement strategies of high performing-high poverty schools in Texas
  • Employing systems for identifying interventions
  • Defining special education as the path to success in the general education program
hierarchy of moral purpose39
Hierarchy of moral purpose
  • Regional
    • School leaders have an obligation to change the context in their own schools and beyond by collaborating with counterparts in other schools, regions, and countries. This acts as a powerful change agent
hierarchy of moral purpose40
Hierarchy of moral purpose
  • This requires a big picture approach as opposed to a microscopic view of your context - leaders need to see both
  • Sharing information for lateral and vertical change - can’t wait for the system to get its act together
hierarchy of moral purpose41
Hierarchy of moral purpose
  • Society
    • School leaders need to know how things work at the top, even if it is changing all the time
    • Sharing information develops a deep, tough culture that is ready for change
how to beat the system
How to beat the system
  • The journey of the individual - taking a risk
    • Competence trust
    • Contractual Trust
    • Communication Trust
how to beat the system43
How to beat the system
  • Competence trust
    • Respect people’s knowledge, skills, and abilities
    • Respect people’s judgment
    • Involve others and seek their input
    • Help people learn new skills
how to beat the system44
How to beat the system
  • Contractual trust
    • Manage expectation
    • Establish boundaries
    • Delegate appropriately
    • Encourage servant leadership
    • Honor agreements
    • Be consistent
how to beat the system45
How to beat the system
  • Communication trust
    • Share information
    • Tell the truth
    • Admit mistakes
    • Give and receive constructive feedback
    • Maintain confidentiality
    • Speak honorably
how to beat the system46
How to beat the system
  • The journey of the individual - fear of failure!
    • Old values that grow fear
    • New Values that grow opportunity by learning from our mistakes
how to beat the system47
How to beat the system
  • Old values that grow fear
    • Always needing to win
    • Maintaining control
    • Avoiding embarrassment
    • Staying in the box
how to beat the system48
How to beat the system
  • New values that grow opportunities by learning from our mistakes
    • Informed choices
    • Internal commitment
    • Open testing
    • Being authentic
how to beat the system49
How to beat the system
  • The journey of the system - strategy
    • Redefine leadership using the four levels of moral purpose
how to beat the system50
How to beat the system
  • The journey of the system - strategy
    • Recognize the goal of continuing development by decentralizing
how to beat the system51
How to beat the system
  • The journey of the system - strategy
    • Get the school size right
      • Primary 350 or less
      • High school 600 or less
how to beat the system52
How to beat the system
  • The journey of the system - strategy
    • Leaders develop leaders on all levels
how to beat the system53
How to beat the system
  • The journey of the system - strategy
    • Improve the teaching profession - high performing people of discipline
summary
Summary
  • Let go of the status quo -

”Where there is no vision, the people perish”

  • What can I do to meet the moral imperative?
references
References
  • Fullan, M., (2003). The moral imperative of school leadership. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin Press
  • Fullan, M., (2005). Facilitators guide: Moral imperative of school leadership. Thousand Oak, CA: Corwin Press