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National Adult Education College and Career Readiness Training Design Initiative Next Generation Assessment Presenters Bonnie Goonen - bv73008@aol.com Susan Pittman-Shetler - skptvs@aol.com. Focus of the Train-the-Trainer Session – Part 1. Rationale underlying new assessment tools

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National Adult Education College and Career Readiness Training Design Initiative


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    1. National Adult Education College and Career Readiness Training Design Initiative • Next Generation Assessment Presenters Bonnie Goonen - bv73008@aol.com Susan Pittman-Shetler - skptvs@aol.com

    2. Focus of the Train-the-Trainer Session – Part 1 Rationale underlying new assessment tools Key points for discussion during training sessions Webb’s Depth of Knowledge (DOK) and related tasks Insight into how you can begin to apply the information to build on instructional approaches Resources for trainer use during future sessions

    3. A new test in 2014: Why? • Changes occurring in the landscape of education and the workforce require a new kind of test • All to ensure that the adult education high school credential remains meaningful for adult learners, employers, and institutions

    4. The Task Ahead • 2014

    5. What are you doing to prepare for the implementation of college and career readiness standards? How are you preparing instructors for the increased rigor of the new assessment? What are your programmatic goals for change in 2013? 2014? What do you need to help you move forward? How will you make the difference?

    6. It’s All in the Planning!

    7. New Reality #1Our World Has Changed

    8. More Important in the 21st Century • Postsecondary education and training • Academic knowledge and skills • Practical literacies: The ability to use and apply the knowledge of math, language arts, science, civics etc. to meet real-world challenges. • Broader competencies: Critical thinking and problem solving, communications and collaboration, creativity, self-sufficiency etc.

    9. 63% of all jobs will require some college or better by 2018 Labor force Labor force Labor force Labor force 91 million 129 million 154 million 166 million Projections of Jobs and Education Requirements Through 2018. Center on Education and the Workforce (June 2010)

    10. What does the workplace need? Education, Job Openings, and Unemployment in Metropolitan America. (2012). Brookings Institute http://www.brookings.edu/research/papers/2012/08/29-education-gap-rothwell#M10420 Further evidence to support the need to educate adults so that they are well prepared for postsecondary education so that they can succeed in today’s workplace.

    11. Time Out for a Video

    12. Our Goal: Preparing Students • For the workplace by connecting skills required for entry-level positions in the 21st century workplace to our curriculum • For postsecondary education by connecting concepts learned to concepts necessary for successful entrance • For real-world situations by actively engaging students in contextualized reading, mathematics, problem-solving, and communication activities

    13. Are Students Prepared? • 60% of enrollees at community colleges need remediation (70% of those need math remediation) • National studies have shown that two-thirds of students who take remedial classes never graduate • Students needing one or more remedial math classes have a 90% drop-out rate • Employers estimate that 39% of high school graduates who have no further education are not prepared for their current job and that 45% are under prepared for advancement. Michael Kirst, Stanford University Study “Rising to the Challenge: Are high school graduates prepared for college and work?” Achieve, Inc., 2005

    14. Connections There is a strong correlation between education, training, career success, satisfaction in life, . . . and personal income.

    15. Purposes of the new GED® test Improved • To provide results leading to the award of a high school equivalency credential • To provide evidence of readinessto enter workforce training programs or postsecondary education • To provide actionable information about a candidate’s academic strengths and weaknesses

    16. Next Steps - Different Roles • What is the role of state staff in determining career and workplace needs? • What is the role of the program manager in determining how the needs of the workplace will be met through instruction? • What is the role of the teacher? • What is the role of the student?

    17. New Reality #2Technology is Essential

    18. New Realities • How many gadgets do you have? • mp3 or iPod • E-book reader • Tablet, such as an iPad • Laptop computer • Smart phone • Cell phone

    19. Would you really want to go back?

    20. Today’s Realities Technology is EVERYWHERE! • Today… • Most job postings are exclusively online • Most job applications are completed online • Most job responsibilities have a technology component built in • In the next decade… • Career opportunities will be created by technological advances

    21. Earning differentials of workers who use computers Source: Rainie, L. Digital differences and money. Pew Research Center (2012)

    22. Computer-based assessment . . . • Enables measurement of concepts and/or skills that cannot be fully or appropriately captured by paper based tests (Bennett 2002; Parshall, Harmes, Davey, & Pashley, 2010) • Improves measurement by increasing the precision or efficiency of the measurement process (Parshall, Spray, Kalohn, & Davey, 2001; van der Linden & Glas, 2000; Wainer, 1990)

    23. New Realities: Question Types

    24. Other Tools Computer Skills • Basic keyboarding • Cut • Copy • Paste • Undo/Redo • Insert • Enter – hard return • Spacing • Backspace • Highlight Directional Tools • Previous/Next • Close • Minimize • Page tabs Resource Tools • Virtual Calculator • Calculator Reference Page • Formula Page • AE Symbol • Item Review/Flagging Word Processing Skills

    25. Why Integrate Technology? • Helps motivate students, especially Millennials and Gen Xers • Builds collaboration skills for students • Requires higher-order thinking and problem-solving skills • Develops skills for postsecondary education and the workplace • Assists students in being successful on the high school completion assessment

    26. Technology in Today’s Classroom Teaching technology is no more optional than teaching students how to use a pencil.

    27. “If a teacher today is not technologically literate - and is unwilling to make the effort to learn more - it's equivalent to a teacher 30 years ago who didn't know how to read and write.” Karl Fisch (2007) In order to teach it, we have to do it!

    28. A Few Strategies to Get Started • Teach mouse and keyboarding skills • Integrate technology as a “normal” part of the curriculum • Look at technology as more than just an ability to use a computer • E-readers • Tablets • Smart phones • Incorporate different question types using the technology of the 2014 GED® test and other computer-based assessment tools

    29. Next Steps - Different Roles • What is the role of state staff in supporting the integration of technology state-wide? • What is the role of the program manager in integrating technology into the adult education program? • What is the role of the teacher? • What is the role of the student?

    30. New Reality #3Diverse Generations

    31. The Power of Four!

    32. Our current GED® test candidates 2011 GED Testing Program® Statistical Report

    33. What is a generation?

    34. Coming to a Center Near You! • ~40% of the population under 25 • 95% of 18-29 year olds use the Internet • 81% of teens play games online • 76% of online teens get news online • 53% have made purchases online • 41% use the web to get health information Pew Research Center (2009)

    35. New Realities Source: Zickuhr, K. & Smith, A. Digital differences. Pew Research Center (2012)

    36. New Realities Source: Zickuhr, K. & Smith, A. Digital differences. Pew Research Center (2012)

    37. What We Know • Teachers tend to teach • in their personal learning style • by the methods by which they were taught • by the generation in which they were born • Students prefer teachers who teach • the way they (the students) learn • by the techniques of the generation in which they were born

    38. Next Steps - Different Roles • What is the role of state staff in supporting the integration of differentiated instructional methods state-wide? • What is the role of the program manager in determining what differentiated curriculum/ strategies/methods are most effective for different generations? • What is the role of the teacher? • What is the role of the student?

    39. New Reality #4Students Must Have Higher-Order Thinking skills

    40. From Bloom to Webb – Cognitive Rigor Cognitive Rigor: Blending the Strengths of Bloom's Taxonomy and Webb's Depth of Knowledge to Enhance Classroom-level Processes http://standardsco.com/PDF/Cognitive_Rigor_Paper.pdf

    41. What is Depth of Knowledge (DOK)?

    42. Webb’s Depth of Knowledge Model Depth of Knowledge

    43. DOK is not about difficulty Difficulty is a reference to how many students answer a question correctly. • How many of you know the definition of exaggerate? DOK 1 – recall • If all the students know the answer, then it is easy. • How many of you know the definition of pellucid? DOK 1 – recall • If most do not know the definition, this question is difficult, but that alone does not change the DOK level.

    44. DOK is about complexity • The intended student learning outcome determines the DOK level. • Instruction and classroom assessments must reflect the DOK level of the intended learning outcome.

    45. Recall: DOK Level 1 • DOK 1 requires recall of information, such as a fact, definition, term, or performance of a simple process or procedure. • Answering a Level 1 item can involve following a simple, well-known procedure or formula.

    46. DOK Level 1 Examples • Recall facts • Apply a formula • Describe features or characteristics • Perform a process or set of procedures

    47. Sample Level 1 GED® Question Recall List

    48. Skills/Concepts: Level 2 • DOK 2 includes mental processing beyond recalling or reproducing a response. Items require students to make some decisions as to how to approach the question or problem. • These actions imply more than one mental or cognitive process/step.

    49. DOK Level 2 Examples • Identify and summarize information from a text • Compare and contrast • Explain cause-effect • Predict a logical outcome • Classify geometrical figures • Retrieve information from a graphic and use it to solve a problem requiring multiple steps

    50. Sample Level 2 GED® Question Comprehend Synthesize Describe (why)