university of scouting 2009 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
University of Scouting 2009 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
University of Scouting 2009

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 24

University of Scouting 2009 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 151 Views
  • Uploaded on

University of Scouting 2009. LEAVE NO TRACE. What LNT is not. LNT is not a set of rules LNT is not enforced LNT is not a local idea or movement LNT is not a bunch of tree huggers. What LNT really is. LNT is a set of ethics LNT is a tool to help the environment

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'University of Scouting 2009' - lang


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
what lnt is not
What LNT is not
  • LNT is not a set of rules
  • LNT is not enforced
  • LNT is not a local idea or movement
  • LNT is not a bunch of tree huggers
what lnt really is
What LNT really is
  • LNT is a set of ethics
  • LNT is a tool to help the environment
  • LNT is designed to enjoy the outdoors
  • LNT is targeted to all ages
  • LNT is targeted to all outdoor activities
  • LNT is part of BSA
background and history
Background and history
  • “Westward in Eden” by Daniel Webster, 1861.
  • “Wilderness Act” US Congress, 1964.
  • Wilderness Watch group in Missoula, Montana.
  • “No Trace” developed by Tom Alt/Forest Service.
  • “Leave No Trace” developed by the Forest Service in Utah.
  • “Pack-it-in:pack-it-out”, “tread lightly”, “take only pictures, leave only footprints” and “give a hoot, don’t pollute” 1980’s slogans.
  • Bill Thomson, first “Leave No Trace” coordinator for the US Forest Service in 1990.
  • LNT becomes the nation’s official wilderness ethics program.
  • “Leave No Trace, Inc. is created in 1994.
  • In 2002 LNT changed its name to the Leave No Trace Center for Outdoor ethics.
how bsa and lnt are linked
How BSA and LNT are linked
  • LNT is a set of outdoor ethics
  • The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law.
how bsa and lnt are linked1
How BSA and LNT are linked
  • LNT is a set of outdoor ethics
  • The mission of the Boy Scouts of America is to prepare young people to make ethical and moral choices over their lifetimes by instilling in them the values of the Scout Oath and Law.
what is an ethic
What is an ethic????

Main Entry: eth·ic

Pronunciation: \’e-thik\

Function: noun

Etymology: Middle English ethik, from Middle French ethique, from Latin ethice, from Greek ēthikē, from ēthikos

Date: 14th century

1plural but sing or plural in constr: the discipline dealing with what is good and bad and with moral duty and obligation

2 a: a set of moral principles : a theory or system of moral values <the present-day materialistic ethic> <an old-fashioned work ethic> —often used in plural but singular or plural in construction <an elaborate ethics><Christian ethics> bplural but sing or plural in constr: the principles of conduct governing an individual or a group <professional ethics> c: a guiding philosophy d: a consciousness of moral importance <forge a conservation ethic>

3plural: a set of moral issues or aspects (as rightness) <debated the ethics of human cloning>

in other words
In other words…
  • We are expected to lead by example…
the se7en principles of lnt
The SE7EN principles of LNT
  • PLAN AHEAD AND PREPARE
  • TRAVEL AND CAMP ON DURABLE SURFACES
  • DISPOSE OF WASTE PROPERLY
  • LEAVE WHAT YOU FIND
  • MINIMIZE CAMPFIRE IMPACTS
  • RESPECT WILDLIFE
  • BE CONSIDERATE OF OTHER VISITORS
plan ahead and prepare
PLAN AHEAD AND PREPARE
  • Know the regulations and special concerns for the area you’ll visit.
  • Prepare for extreme weather, hazards, and emergencies.
  • Schedule your trip to avoid times of high use.
  • Visit in small groups. Split larger parties into groups of 4-6.
  • Repackage food to minimize waste.
  • Use a map and compass to eliminate the use of rock cairns, flagging or marking paint.
travel and camp on durable surfaces
TRAVEL AND CAMP ON DURABLE SURFACES
  • Durable surfaces include established trails and campsites, rock, gravel, dry grasses or snow.
  • Protect riparian areas by camping at least 200 feet from lakes, streams.
  • Good campsites are found, not made. Altering a site is not necessary.

In popular areas

  • Concentrate use on existing trails and campsites.
  • Walk single file in the middle of the trail, even when wet or muddy.
  • Keep campsites small. Focus activity in areas where vegetation is absent.

In pristine areas

  • Disperse use to prevent the creation of campsite and trails.
  • Avoid places where impacts are just beginning.
dispose of waste properly
DISPOSE OF WASTE PROPERLY
  • Pack it in, pack it out. Inspect your campsite and rest areas for trash or spilled food. Pack out all trash, leftover food, and litter.
  • Deposit solid human waste in catholes dug 6 to 8 inches deep at least 200 feet from water, camp, and trails. Cover and disguise the cathole when finished.
  • Pack out toilet paper and hygiene products.
  • To wash yourself or your dishes, carry water 200 feet away from streams or lakes and use small amounts of biodegradable soap. Scatter strained dishwater.
leave what you find
LEAVE WHAT YOU FIND
  • Preserve the past: examine, but do not touch, cultural or historic structures and artifacts.
  • Leave rocks, plants and other natural objects as you find there.
  • Avoid introducing or transporting non-native species.
  • Do not build structure, furniture, or dig trenches.
minimize campfire impacts
MINIMIZE CAMPFIRE IMPACTS
  • Campfires can cause lasting impacts to the backcountry. Use a lightweight stove for cooking and enjoy a candle lantern for light.
  • Where fire are permitted, use established fire rings, fire pans, or mound fires.
  • Keep fires small. Only use sticks from the ground that can be broken by hand.
  • Burn all the wood and coals to ash, put out campfire completely, then scatter cool ashes.
respect wild life
RESPECT WILD LIFE
  • Observe wildlife from a distance. Do not follow or approach them.
  • Never feed animals. Feeding wildlife damages their health, alters natural behaviors, and exposes them to predators and other dangers.
  • Protect pets at all times, or leave them at home.
  • Avoid wildlife during sensitive times: mating, nesting, raising young, or winter.
be considerate of other visitors
BE CONSIDERATE OF OTHER VISITORS.
  • Respect other visitors and protect the quality of their experience.
  • Be courteous. Yield to other users on the trail.
  • Step on the downhill side of the trail when encountering pack stock.
  • Take breaks and camp away from trails and other visitors.
  • Let nature’s sounds prevail. Avoid loud voices and noises.
leave no trace achievement award
Leave No Trace Achievement Award
  • Tiger cubs, Cub scouts and Webelos scouts
    • Discuss with your leader or parent/guardian the importance of the Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines.
    • On three separate outings, practice the frontcountry guidelines of Leave No Trace.
    • Boys in a Tiger Cub den complete the activities for Achievement 5, Let's Go Outdoors; boys in a Wolf den complete Requirement 7, Your Living World; boys in a Bear den complete Requirement 12, Family Outdoor Adventures; boys in a Webelos den earn the Outdoorsman activity badge.
    • Participate in a Leave No Trace-related service project.
    • Promise to practice the Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines by signing the Cub Scout Leave No Trace Pledge.
    • Draw a poster to illustrate the Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines and display it at a pack meeting.
leave no trace achievement award1
Leave No Trace Achievement Award
  • Cub scout leaders
    • Discuss with your den's Cub Scouts or your pack's leaders the importance of the Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines.
    • On three separate outings demonstrate and practice the frontcountry guidelines of Leave No Trace.
    • Participate in presenting a den, pack, district, or council awareness session on Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines.
    • Participate in a Leave No Trace-related service project.
    • Commit yourself to the Leave No Trace frontcountry guidelines by signing the Cub Scout Leave No Trace Pledge.
    • Assist at least three boys in earning Cub Scouting's Leave No Trace Awareness Award.
leave no trace achievement award2
Leave No Trace Achievement Award
  • Boy Scouts
    • Recite and explain in your own words the principles of Leave No Trace, and discuss how an ethical guideline differs from a rule.
    • On three separate camping/backpacking trips with your troop or team, demonstrate and practice the Leave No Trace skills appropriate to the trip.
    • Earn the Camping and Environmental Science merit badges.
    • Participate in a Leave No Trace-related service project that reduces or rehabilitates recreational impacts. Discuss with your troop or team which recreational impacts were involved with the project.
    • Give a 10-minute presentation on a Leave No Trace topic approved by your unit leader to a Scouting unit or other interested group.
    • Teach a Leave No Trace-related skill to a Scouting unit or other interested group.
leave no trace achievement award3
Leave No Trace Achievement Award
  • Venturers
    • Recite and explain in your own words the principles of Leave No Trace, and discuss how an ethical guideline differs from a rule.
    • On three separate camping/backpacking trips with your ship or crew, demonstrate and practice the Leave No Trace skills appropriate to the trip.
    • Earn the Camping and Environmental Science merit badges (or do No.3 under the Scouter requirements).
    • Participate in a Leave No Trace-related service project that reduces or rehabilitates recreational impacts. Discuss with your ship or crew which recreational impacts were involved with the project.
    • Give a 10-minute presentation on a Leave No Trace topic approved by your unit leader to a Scouting unit or other interested group.
    • Teach a Leave No Trace-related skill to a Scouting unit or other interested group.
leave no trace achievement award4
Leave No Trace Achievement Award
  • Scouter and Advisor
    • Recite and explain the principles of Leave No Trace.
    • On three separate camping/backpacking trips demonstrate and practice the principles of Leave No Trace.
    • Share with another Scout Leader/Advisor your understanding and knowledge of the Camping and Environmental Science merit badge pamphlets.
    • Actively assist (training, advice, and general supervision) a Scout/Venturer in planning, organizing, and leading a service project related to Leave No Trace.
    • Assist a minimum of three Scouts/Venturers in earning the Leave No Trace Awareness Award.
    • Plan and conduct a Leave No Trace awareness session for Scouts, Venturers, Scouters, or an interested group outside of Scouting.
review
Review

Leave No Trace is a set of principles for participation in outdoor recreation that seeks to minimize the impact on the natural environment. Proponents of Leave No Trace believe that individual impacts caused by recreation can accumulate to degrade the land. Therefore, the Leave No Trace message encourages people who spend time in the out-of-doors to behave in such a way that they can minimize unavoidable impacts and prevent avoidable impacts.

bibliography
Bibliography
  • http://www.blm.gov/
  • BACKPACKER, Leave No Trace. By Annette McGivney, 2003. ISBN 0-89886-910-2
  • http://www.lnt.org
  • http://www.fws.gov/
  • http://www.fs.fed.us/
  • http://www.wikipedia.org
  • http://www.scouting.org
  • http://www.usscouts.org
  • http://www.tcfroar.org/