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Plagiarism

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  1. Plagiarism • What is Plagiarism? • Quoting/Paraphrasing/General Indebtedness • Copying/allowing copying • Penalties • General knowledge • References or Bibliography? • How to reference • Examples

  2. Acknowledgement • For these notes I have relied heavily on the content and organisation of two web sites • Department of Optometry and Visual Science, City University. http://www.city.ac.uk/optometry/html/plagiarism.html • Kingston University, Student guide http://www.kingston.ac.uk/~kuweb/awards/acadmis-index.htm

  3. What is Plagiarism? • Passing off someone else’s ideas or words as if they were your own • Presenting the work of another as your own with proper acknowledgement • It applies equally to the work of other students as to published sources

  4. Quoting and Paraphrasing • Quoting • Allowed, you must • Put the quote in inverted commas • Give the source so that the reader could look it up • Paraphrasing • Putting someone else’s ideas into your own words • Should acknowledge the source in each paragraph • General Indebtedness • Careful here • If the ordering or argument reflect one source then this should be stated

  5. Copying/allowing copying • Copying work from other students = plagiarism • Allowing copying incurs similar penalties to plagiarism

  6. Penalties • From • 0% for assignment (resubmission with marks caped at minimum may be allowed) • To • Explusion

  7. General Knowledge • In general you should reference every fact except • When it is well known/generally accepted. So no need to reference facts such as: • 1939 – 1945 WW2 • Newton discovered gravity • But, you should reference anything the reader is likely to query/not know. Eg • Superconductivity was first discovered by Professor Heike in 1911 [1] In the references section you would list [1] David Fishlock A guide to Superconductivity 1969 McDonald & Co. p1

  8. References or Bibliography? • References • Anything cited in your or used in the preparation of your report • Bibliography • all papers, web sites, newspapers, periodicals or books that you have read during the preparation of your report • sources that have been useful to you but that are not directly referred to or quoted from in your report

  9. References section • See City University’s guide • http://www.city.ac.uk/library/research_support/citation.html

  10. Examples • You quote the first law of thermodynamics • Energy can neither be created nor destroyed; it can only change forms. • You read a book about the history of the Daily Mail for your British Media essay • You use part of a share ware routine for your java script coursework