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Drawing Conclusions. Drawing Conclusions. In this lesson you will learn how to draw conclusions from materials you read. Drawing Conclusions. The dictionary defines conclusion as “the judgment, decision, or opinion formed after an investigation or thought process.”. Drawing Conclusions.

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Drawing Conclusions
  • In this lesson you will learn how to draw conclusions from materials you read.
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Drawing Conclusions
  • The dictionary defines conclusion as “the judgment, decision, or opinion formed after an investigation or thought process.”
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Drawing Conclusions
  • You draw conclusions every day about incidents you witness, information you gather or about texts you read. If you see smoke filtering out of the kitchen and the smoke alarm is buzzing, what conclusion would you draw? There is a fire in the kitchen!
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Drawing Conclusions
  • The first decision you make when reading is to determine what type of material you are reading. What is the source? Is it fiction or fact? When you know the type or category of text, then you receive your first clues about what kind of conclusions can be determined.
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Drawing Conclusions
  • Let’s use the internet to practice finding out the type and source of reading materials.
  • Click on the website below and find out what type of resource it shows. Briefly scan the front page, and then go to the next page in this lesson.
  • www.nytimes.com
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Drawing Conclusions
  • What did you find? It was the online version of the New York Times, a daily newspaper from New York City. What could you conclude that you could read in this newspaper?
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Drawing Conclusions
  • You would find news articles, sports articles, classified ads, reviews of movies, editorials, features and photos. How did you draw this conclusion? Your personal knowledge and experience of having read other newspapers gives you the ability to conclude what you can probably read in the New York Times.
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Drawing Conclusions
  • It is easiest to draw conclusions from nonfiction or scientific sources. The facts are presented and are usually backed up with specific data. Drawing conclusions from fiction, poetry or other literature is not as easy and sometimes there can be more than one conclusion that is subject to debate.
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Drawing Conclusions
  • Let’s start with a simple type of conclusion – the main point of a story. You are going to read the Aesop Fable, The Hart and the Hunter to determine the moral point. As you read the story, look for clues on what the character is supposed to learn.
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Drawing Conclusions
  • The Hart was once drinking from a pool and admiring the noble figure he made there. “Ah,” said he, “where can you see such noble horns as these, with such antlers! I wish I had legs more worthy to bear such a noble crown; it is a pity they are so slim and slight.” At that moment a Hunter approached and sent an arrow whistling after him. Away bounded the Hart, and soon, by the aid of his nimble legs, was nearly out of sight of the Hunter. However, not noticing where he was going, he passed under some trees with branches growing low down and his antlers were caught. The hunter had time to come up. “Alas! Alas!” cried the Hart, “_______?_______”
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Drawing Conclusions
  • The last words of the Hart were: “We often despise what is most useful to us.” Was your answer similar to this idea?
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Drawing Conclusions
  • The Literature Game will test your conclusion making skills by giving you multiple choice questions on selections from three literature sources. The first is The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett. .
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Drawing Conclusions
  • The second Literature Game will test your conclusion making skills by giving you multiple choice questions on selections from Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain.
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Drawing Conclusions
  • A third Literature Game will test your conclusion making skills by giving you multiple choice questions on The Cremation of Sam McGee by Robert W. Service.
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Drawing Conclusions
  • Summary
  • This lesson has taught how to draw conclusions from different reading materials. You have practiced making conclusions from nonfiction, fiction and poetry.
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Drawing Conclusions
  • End of Lesson