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The Current State of Cooking in Ireland: The Relationship between Cooking Skills and Food Choice. John Lydon & Máirtín Mac Con Iomaire. This Research investigated. The attitudes of Irish people to food to ascertain whether the acquisition of cooking skills influences food choice.

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The Current State of Cooking in Ireland: The Relationship between Cooking Skills and Food Choice


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    1. The Current State of Cooking in Ireland:The Relationship betweenCooking Skills and Food Choice John Lydon & Máirtín Mac Con Iomaire

    2. This Research investigated The attitudes of Irish people to food to ascertain whether the acquisition of cooking skills influences food choice Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    3. Rationale • Caraher et al. (1999) found that cooking skills play an important part in healthy eating as a vehicle for lower-paid people to achieve a healthy diet and is an essential life-skill. Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    4. We will cover: • Current state of health in the Nation • Cooking skills in the maintenance of health • Findings • Conclusion • Recommendations Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    5. Irish Diet The North/South Ireland Food Consumption Survey (2000) report indicated that the Irish diet: • less than optimum, with iron, calcium and folic acid intakes inadequate in women of childbearing age • micronutrient intakes were adequate due mainly to the consumption of vitamin and mineral supplements • food intakes are calorie dense, yet nutrient deficient, • with increased risk of chronic degenerative diseases Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    6. Irish Diet • The frequency of obesity in the population is at an all time high (IHF, 2007) • Since 1990 obesity has increased in Ireland by 67% (NSIFCS, 2000) • A pilot study in Dublin showed that almost two in every three people tested were at risk of developing Type-2 diabetes (VHI, 2009) Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    7. Irish Diet • 10,000 people die each year from cardiovascular disease (CVD) • including coronary heart disease (CHD), stroke and other circulatory diseases. CVD is the most common cause of death in Ireland, accounting for 36% of all deaths’ (IHF, 2009) Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    8. Irish Diet • Processed foods are heavily consumed by adults in the 15–24 year age brackets, who have grown up primarily on a diet of convenience food (Mintel, 2006) • The reheating of these products is not classified as cooking in the true meaning of the word Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    9. Irish Diet • Imperative that individuals become more knowledgeable about food in order to maintain or improve health (Germov & Williams, 1999) Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    10. Cooking Skills • Cooking is all empowering in that it gives back the propensity to individuals and families to have a varied and balanced diet (Caraher et al., 1999; Caraher & Lang, 1999) • They found that people wanted to expand their skill base but found it challenging because they had not developed the skills to experiment with cooking Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    11. Cooking Skills • Crotty (1999) hypothesises that the acquisition and knowledge of food preparation skills is a means that can guard against what he calls ‘food insufficiency’ Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    12. Means of Learning to Cook • In the home • In school Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    13. Sample • Respondents were drawn from staff and students from Athlone Institute of Technology • According to the theory of probability, this geographically heterogeneous sample is representative of the region and therefore the country as a whole (Oppenheim, 1992) Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    14. Country of Origin Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    15. Age of Respondents Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    16. Home Cooking Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    17. How Often Would You? Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    18. How Often Would You? Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    19. How Often Would You? Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    20. How Often Would You? Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    21. How Often Would You? Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    22. What is your main reason for purchasing convenience food? Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    23. How health conscious are you about the food you eat? Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    24. How often do you cook in a week? Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    25. Conclusions • Achieving a healthy balanced diet remains a challenge for many people at all levels of Irish society, but it is particularly important for those that cannot cook • The reliance on convenience food may mean an unconscious over-consumption of fats, salts and sugar • Continued consumption of convenience foods without the necessary knowledge of food preparation reduces awareness of a healthy diet Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    26. Conclusions • Changing family dynamics mean that parents are not cooking from fresh raw ingredients possibly due to work commitments • Educators need to make this subject more attractive and accessible to all students • Without having previous experience, those wishing to learn cooking skills may be left without a knowledge base from which to build Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    27. Conclusions • Many researchers are concerned that this may lead to a de-skilling of cooking skills • There is growing reliance upon pre-prepared food in the preparation of family meals • Despite the current recession and possibility of being out of work, people may be lacking the inclination or time to cook meals from scratch • Lack of practice will certainly affect cooking competence Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    28. The findings suggest that: • It is time to re-examine the significance of cooking with regard to health and health promotion • If health promoters realistically wish to increase the Irish population’s compliance with dietary guidelines then a positive support structure for domestic cooking skills is essential Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    29. Recommendations • Develop a strategy that addresses secondary school students’ low involvement in Home Economic programmes once the junior certificate cycle is complete • Curriculum should enable the acquisition of key skills – changing family circumstances should be taken in to account • Those psychomotive skills that require time to develop should be catered for in the programme Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]

    30. Summary: • Current state of health in the Nation • Cooking skills in the maintenance of health • Findings • Conclusion • Recommendations Lydon & Mac Con Iomaire [2011]