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  1. Smarter Balanced 101

  2. CCSS/Goals • All students college and career ready in literacy and mathematics no later than end of high school • Encourage a highly literate population of learners, able to think critically and responsibly. • Become responsible citizens of the world.

  3. Defining the Common Core State Standards

  4. Defining • College and Career Ready

  5. What will our students need to: Know? Do ?

  6. Reading Risk CA Mapping State Proficiency Standards onto NAEP Scales, IES August 2011

  7. ProficiencyGrade 4 Reading 2009

  8. Reading Risk CA Mapping State Proficiency Standards onto NAEP Scales, IES August 2011

  9. ProficiencyGrade 8 Reading 2009

  10. Math Risk CA Mapping State Proficiency Standards onto NAEP Scales, IES August 2011

  11. ProficiencyGrade 4 Mathematics 2009

  12. Math Risk CA Mapping State Proficiency Standards onto NAEP Scales, IES August 2011

  13. ProficiencyGrade 8 Mathematics 2009

  14. California Reading & Math Rigor Risk Scholastic Inc.

  15. Defining • College and Career Ready

  16. Four Keys to College and Career Readiness Source: https://www.epiconline.org/readiness/solution.dot

  17. Achievement Level Descriptors

  18. Smarter Balanced Achievement Levels:Alignment with PARCC & NAEP • Smarter Balanced — Level 3 is College Content-Ready • PARCC—Level 4 is College Ready

  19. College Content Readiness • Smarter Balanced recognizes that college readiness encompasses a wide array of knowledge, skills, and dispositions only some of which will be measured by Smarter Balanced assessments. As a result, Smarter Balanced narrowed the focus of the “college readiness” definition to “content readiness” in the core areas of ELA/literacy and Mathematics.

  20. ELA Content Readiness Definition Students who perform at the College Content- Ready level in English Language Arts and Literacy demonstrate reading writing, listening and research skills necessary for introductory courses in a variety of disciplines. They also demonstrate subject area knowledge and skills associated with readiness for entry-level, transferrable, credit-bearing English and composition courses.

  21. Math Content Readiness Definition Students who perform at the College Content- Ready level in Mathematics and Literacy demonstrate foundational mathematics and quantitative reasoning necessary for introductory courses in a variety of disciplines. They also demonstrate subject area knowledge and skills associated with readiness for entry-level, transferrable, credit-bearing mathematics and statistic courses.

  22. Policy Framework for Grade 11 Achievement Levels

  23. Policy Framework for Grade 11 Achievement Levels

  24. Policy Framework for Grade 11 Achievement Levels

  25. Achievement Level Descriptors Can be found at: http://www.smarterbalanced.org/achievement-level-descriptors-and-college-readiness/

  26. Backward Design • “To begin with the end in mind means to start with a clear under-standing of your destination. It means you know where you’re going…so the steps you take are always in the right direction.”

  27. Shifts in ELA/Literacy Instruction • Building knowledge through content-richnonfiction • Reading, writing,and speaking grounded in evidence from text, both literary and informational • Regular practice with complex text and its academic language

  28. Progression Charts

  29. Standard Progression (K-2) RI.K.7: With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the text in which they appear (e.g., what person, place, thing, or idea in the text an illustration depicts). RI.1.7: Use the illustrations and details in a text to descibe its key ideas. -Minus: with prompting and support RI.2.7: Explain how specific images (e.g., a diagram showing how a machine works) contribute to and clarify a text.

  30. Standard Progression (3-5) RI.3.7: Use information gained from illustrations (e.g., maps, photographs) and the words in a text to demonstrate understanding of the text (e.g., where, when, why, and how key events occur). RI.4.7: Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears. RI.5.7: Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently.

  31. Standard Progression (6-8) RI.6.7: Integrate information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue. RI.7.7: Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version of the text, analyzing each medium's portrayal of the subject (e.g., how the delivery of a speech affects the impact of the words). RI.8.7: Evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of using different mediums (e.g., print or digital text, video, multimedia) to present a particular topic or idea.

  32. Standard Progression (9-12) RI.9-10.7: Analyze various accounts of a subject told in different mediums (e.g., a person's life story in both print and multimedia), determining which details are emphasized in each account. RI.11-12.7: Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in different media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem.

  33. Deconstructing the Standards “By studying the wording of the standard to determine precisely what students need to know and to be able to do, educators become acutely aware of what it is they are to teach and later assess.” --Larry Ainsworth

  34. Literacy Example • RL.3.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, distinguishing literal from nonliteral language.

  35. Deconstruction Questions What is the standard asking students to do? What is the standard asking students to know? If applicable, how is the student asked to demonstrate?

  36. Knowledge Taxonomy • Awareness • Comprehension • Application • Analysis • Synthesis • Evaluation

  37. Application Model • Knowledge in one discipline • Application within discipline • Application across disciplines • Application to real-world predictable situations • Application to real-world unpredictable situations

  38. Students gather and store bits of knowledge/information and are expected to remember or understand this acquired knowledge. Application 3 A Acquisition Comprehension 2 Low-level Knowledge Awareness 1 1 Knowledge in one discipline 2 Apply knowledge in one discipline

  39. A Quadrant name label define select identify list memorize recite locate record definition worksheet list quiz test workbook true-false reproduction recitation Verbs Products

  40. Students use acquired knowledge to solve problems, design solutions, and complete work. Application 3 B Application Comprehension 2 Awareness 1 Low-level Application 3 Apply knowledge across disciplines 5 Apply to real-world unpredictable situation 4 Apply to real-world predictable situation

  41. B Quadrant apply sequence demonstrate interview construct solve calculate dramatize interpret illustrate scrapbook summary interpretation collection annotation explanation solution demonstration outline Verbs Products

  42. Students extend and refine their knowledge so that they can use it automatically and routinely to analyze and solve problems and create solutions. Evaluation 6 C Assimilation Synthesis 5 Analysis 4 High-level Knowledge Application 3 1 Knowledge in one discipline 2 Apply knowledge in one discipline

  43. C Quadrant sequence annotate examine report criticize paraphrase calculate expand summarize classify diagram Products Verbs essay abstract blueprint inventory report plan chart questionnaire classification diagram discussion collection annotation

  44. Students think in complex ways and apply acquired knowledge and skills, even when confronted with perplexing unknowns, to find creative solutions and take action that further develops their skills and knowledge. Evaluation 6 D Adaptation Synthesis 5 Analysis 4 High-level Application Application 3 3 Apply knowledge across disciplines 4 Apply to real-world predictable situation 5 Apply to real-world unpredictable situation

  45. D Quadrant evaluate validate justify rate referee infer rank dramatize argue conclude evaluation newspaper estimation trial editorial radio program play collage machine adaptation poem debate new game invention Verbs Products

  46. 2 Second Rule The “two-second rule” is used by a driver who wants to maintain a safe following distance at any speed. A driver must count two seconds from when the car in front of him or her passes a fixed point, such as a tree, until the driver passes the same fixed point. Drivers use this rule to determine the minimum distance to follow a car traveling at the same speed. A diagram representing this distance is shown. As the speed of the cars increases, the minimum following distance also increases. Explain how the “two-second rule” leads to a greater minimum following distance as the speed of the cars increases. As part of your explanation, include the minimum following distances, in feet, for cars traveling at 30 miles per hour and 60 miles per hour.

  47. Cognitive Rigor and Depth of Knowledge • The level of complexity of the cognitive demand. • Level 1: Quad A Recall and Reproduction • Requires eliciting information such as a fact, definition, term, or a simple procedure, as well as performing a simple algorithm or applying a formula. • Level 2: Quad B Basic Skills and Concepts • Requires the engagement of some mental processing beyond a recall of information. • Level 3: Quad C Strategic Thinking and Reasoning • Requires reasoning, planning, using evidence, and explanations of thinking. • Level 4: Quad DExtended Thinking • Requires complex reasoning, planning, developing, and thinking most likely over an extended period of time.