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Physics of Technology PHYS 1800. Lecture 23 First Law of Thermodynamics. PHYSICS OF TECHNOLOGY Spring 2009 Assignment Sheet. *Homework Handout. Physics of Technology PHYS 1800. Lecture 23 First Law of Thermodynamics. Review of Temperature and Heat. Describing Motion and Interactions.

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physics of technology phys 1800

Physics of TechnologyPHYS 1800

Lecture 23

First Law of Thermodynamics

physics of technology phys 18003

Physics of TechnologyPHYS 1800

Lecture 23

First Law of Thermodynamics

Review of Temperature and Heat

describing motion and interactions
Describing Motion and Interactions

Position—where you are in space (L or meter)

Velocity—how fast position is changing with time (LT-1 or m/s)

Acceleration—how fast velocity is changing with time (LT-2 or m/s2)

Force— what is required to change to motion of a body (MLT-2 or kg-m/s2 or N)

Inertia (mass)— a measure of the force needed to change the motion of a body (M)

Energy—the potential for an object to do work.(ML2T-2 or kg m2/s2 or N-m or J)

Work is equal to the force applied times the distance moved. W = F d

Kinetic Energy is the energy associated with an object’s motion. KE=½ mv2

Potential Energy is the energy associated with an objects position.

Gravitational potential energy PEgravity=mgh

Spring potential energy PEapring= -kx

Momentum— the potential of an object to induce motion in another object (MLT-1 or kg-m/s)

Angular Momentum and Rotational Energy— the equivalent constants of motion for rotation (MT-1 or kg/s) and (MLT-2 or kg m/s2 or N)

Pressure— force divided by the area over which the force is applied (ML-1T-1 or kg/m-s or N/m2 or Pa)

dennison s laws thermal poker or how to get a hot hand in physics
Dennison’s Laws Thermal Poker(or How to Get a Hot Hand in Physics)
  • 0th Law: Full House beats Two Pairs
  • 1st Law: We’re playing the same game (but with a wild card)
  • 2nd Law: You can’t win in Vegas.
  • 3rd Law: In fact, you always loose.
  • 0th Law: Defines Temperature
  • 1st Law: Conservation of Energy (with heat)
  • 2nd Law: You can’t recover all heat losses

(or defining entropy)

  • 3rd Law: You can never get to absolute 0.
slide6

Heat

  • What is heat?
  • What is the relationship between quantity of heat and temperature?
  • What happens to a body (solid, liquid, gas) when thermal energy is added or removed?

Thermal Energy

solid

Solid: Atoms vibrating in all directions about their fixed equilibrium (lattice) positions. Atoms constantly colliding with each other.

Liquid: Atoms still oscillating and colliding with each other but they are free to move so that the long range order (shape) of body is lost.

Gas: No equilibrium position, no oscillations, atoms are free and move in perpetual high-speed “zig-zag” dance punctuated by collisions.

liquid

gas

what is temperature
What is Temperature?
  • If two objects are in contact with one another long enough, the two objects have the same temperature.
  • This begins to define temperature, by defining when two objects have the same temperature.
    • When the physical properties are no longer changing, the objects are said to be in thermal equilibrium.
    • Two or more objects in thermal equilibrium have the same temperature.
    • This is the zeroth law of thermodynamics.
    • Corollary: Heat flows from hot to cold (DUH!!!)
temperature and heat
Temperature and Heat
  • When two objects at different temperatures are placed in contact, heat will flow from the object with the higher temperature to the object with the lower temperature.
  • Heat added increases temperature, and heat removed decreases temperature.
  • Heat and temperature

are not the same.

  • Temperature is a

quantity that tells us

which direction the

heat will flow.

Heatis a form of energy.

(Here comes

conservation of energy!!!)

physics of technology phys 18009

Physics of TechnologyPHYS 1800

Lecture 19

Temperature

First Law of Thermodynamics

joule s experiment and the first law of thermodynamics
Joule’s Experiment and the First Law of Thermodynamics
  • Rumford noticed that cannon barrels became hot during drilling.
  • Joule performed a series of experiments showing that mechanical work could raise the temperature of a system.
  • In one such experiment, a falling mass turns a paddle in an insulated beaker of water, producing an increase in temperature.
joule s experiment and the first law of thermodynamics11
Joule’s Experiment and the First Law of Thermodynamics
  • Joule’s experiments led to Kelvin’s statement of the first law of thermodynamics.
    • Both work and heat represent transfers of energy into or out of a system.
    • If energy is added to a system either as work or heat, the internal energy of the system increases accordingly.
  • The increase in the internal

energy of a system is equal

to the amount of heat added

to a system minus the

amount of work done by the

system.U = Q - W

joule s experiment and the first law of thermodynamics12
Joule’s Experiment and the First Law of Thermodynamics
  • This introduced the concept of the internal energy of a system.
    • An increase in internal energy may show up as an increase in temperature, or as a change in phase, or any other increase in the kinetic and/or potential energy of the atoms or molecules making up the system.
    • Internal energy is a property of the system uniquely determined by the state of the system.
  • The internal energy of the system is the sum of the kinetic and potential energies of the atoms and molecules making up the system. U = Q - W

solid

liquid

gas

physics of technology phys 180013

Physics of TechnologyPHYS 1800

Lecture 23

First Law of Thermodynamics

Specific Heat and Calorimetry

heat and specific heat capacity
Heat and Specific Heat Capacity
  • What happens when objects or fluids at different temperatures come in contact with one another?
    • The colder object gets hotter, and the hotter object gets colder, until they both reach the same temperature.
    • What is it that flows between the objects to account for this?
  • We use the term heat for this quantity.
  • Recall the 1st Law: U = Q - W
slide15

1000

1 x 270

Example:

If 1000 calories of heat is added to a glass of water (270 grams) initially at 20 ºC, what is its resultant temperature?

By definition: c = 1 calorie /gram .ºC

Q = c.m.ΔT

or ΔT = =

= 3.7 ºC

Tf = (Ti + ΔT) = 23.7 ºC

Note:In “metric” units 1000 calories would be required to raise temperature of 1kg of water by 1 ºC.

Q

c.m

Q = 1000 calories

m = 270 grams

Ti = 20 ºC

heat and specific heat capacity16
Heat and Specific Heat Capacity
  • Heat flow is a form of energy transfer between objects.
  • One-hundred grams of room-temperature water is more effective than 100 grams of room-temperature steel shot in cooling a hot cup of water.

How much heat does it take to raise the temperature of something?

  • Steel has a lower specific heat capacity than water.
  • The specific heat capacity of a material is the relative amount of heat needed to raise its temperature.
heat and specific heat capacity17
Heat and Specific Heat Capacity
  • The specific heat capacity of a material is the quantity of heat needed to change a unit mass of the material by a unit amount in temperature.
    • For example, to change 1 gram by 1 Celsius degree.
    • It is a property of the material, determined by experiment.
    • The specific heat capacity of water is 1 cal/gC: it takes 1 calorie of heat to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water by 1C.
  • We can then calculate how much heat must be absorbed by a material to change its temperature by a given amount:

Q = mcT where Q = quantity of heat

m = mass

c = specific heat capacity

T = change in temperature

examples of different specific heat capacities
Examples of Different Specific Heat Capacities:

High

Low

High

Water (and hydrogen gas) have very high specific heats.

slide19

If the specific heat capacity of ice is 0.5 cal/gC°, how much heat would have to be added to 200 g of ice, initially at a temperature of -10°C, to raise the ice to the melting point?

  • 1,000 cal
  • 2,000 cal
  • 4,000 cal
  • 0 cal

m = 200 g

c = 0.5 cal/gC°

T = -10°C

Q = mcT

= (200 g)(0.5 cal/gC°)(10°C) = 1,000 cal

(heat required to raise the temperature)

physics of technology phys 180020

Physics of TechnologyPHYS 1800

Lecture 23

First Law of Thermodynamics

Changes of Phase

phase changes and latent heat

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

+

Phase Changes and Latent Heat
  • When an object goes through a change of phase or state, heat is added or removed without changing the temperature. Instead, the state of matter changes: solid to liquid, for example.
  • The amount of heat needed per unit mass to produce a phase change is called the latent heat.
    • The latent heat of fusion of water corresponds to the amount of heat needed to melt one gram of ice.
    • The latent heat of vaporization of water corresponds to the amount of heat needed to turn one gram of water into steam.

Solid

slide22

If the specific heat capacity of ice is 0.5 cal/gC°, how much heat would have to be added to 200 g of ice, initially at a temperature of -10°C, to completely melt the ice?

  • 1,000 cal
  • 14,000 cal
  • 16,000 cal
  • 17,000 cal

Lf = 80 cal/g Q = mLf

= (200 g)(80 cal/g) = 16,000 cal

(heat required to melt the ice)

Total heat required to raise the ice to 0 °C and then to melt the ice is:

1,000 cal + 16,000 cal =17,000 cal= 17 kcal

slide23

A hot plate is used to transfer 400 cal of heat to a beaker containing ice and water; 500 J of work are also done on the contents of the beaker by stirring. What is the increase in internal energy of the ice-water mixture?

W = -500 J

Q = 400 cal

= (400 cal)(4.19 J/cal)

= 1680 J

U = Q - W

= 1680 J - (-500 J)

= 2180 J

  • 900 J
  • 1180 J
  • 1680 J
  • 2180 J
slide24

A hot plate is used to transfer 400 cal of heat to a beaker containing ice and water; 500 J of work are also done on the contents of the beaker by stirring. How much ice melts in this process?

Lf= 80 cal/g

= (80 cal/g)(4.19 J/cal)

= 335 J/g

U = mLf

m = U/ Lf

= (2180 J) / (335 J/g)

= 6.5 g

  • 0.037 g
  • 0.154 g
  • 6.5 g
  • 27.25 g
physics of technology phys 180025

Physics of TechnologyPHYS 1800

Lecture 23

First Law of Thermodynamics

Behavior of Ideal Gases

gas behavior and the first law
Gas Behavior and The First Law

Consider a gas in a cylinder with a movable piston.

If the piston is pushed inward by an external force, work is done on the gas, adding energy to the system.

  • The force exerted on the piston by the gas equals the pressure of the gas times the area of the piston:
  • F = PA
  • The work done equals the force exerted by the piston times the distance the piston moves:
  • W = Fd = (PA)d = PV
gas behavior and the first law27
Gas Behavior and The First Law
  • If the gas is being compressed, the change in volume is negative, and the work done is negative.
    • Work done on the system is negative.
    • Negative work increases the energy of the system.
  • If the gas is expanding, positive work is done by the gas on its surroundings, and the internal energy of the gas decreases.
ideal gas behavior
Ideal Gas Behavior
  • An ideal gas is a gas for which the forces between atoms are small enough to be ignored.
    • For an ideal gas, absolute

temperature is directly

related to the average

kinetic energy of the

molecules of the system.

    • Most gases behave

approximately as

ideal gases.

  • If the process is adiabatic, no heat flows into or out of the gas.
  • Even though no heat is added, the temperature of a gas will increase in an adiabatic compression, since the internal energy increases.
ideal gas behavior29
Ideal Gas Behavior
  • In an isothermal process, the temperature does not change.
    • The internal energy must be constant.
    • The change in internal energy, U, is zero.
    • If an amount of heat Q is added to the gas, an equal amount of work W will be done by the gas on its surroundings, from U = Q - W.
  • In an isobaric process, the pressure of the gas remains constant.
    • The internal energy increases as the gas is heated, and so does the temperature.
    • The gas also expands, removing some of the internal energy.
    • Experiments determined that the pressure, volume, and absolute temperature of an ideal gas are related by the equation of state:

PV = NkTwhere N is the number of molecules

and k is Boltzmann’s constant.

what process makes a hot air balloon rise
What process makes a hot-air balloon rise?
  • When gas is heated in a hot-air balloon, the pressure, not the temperature, remains constant.
  • The gas undergoes an isobaric expansion.
  • Since the gas has expanded, the density has decreased.
  • The balloon experiences a buoyant force because the gas inside the balloon is less dense than the surrounding atmosphere.
physics of technology phys 180031

Physics of TechnologyPHYS 1800

Lecture 23

First Law of Thermodynamics

Heat Transfer

the flow of heat
The Flow of Heat
  • There are three basic processes for heat flow:
    • Conduction
    • Convection
    • Radiation
the flow of heat33
The Flow of Heat
  • What process makes a car’s interior heat up when parked in the sun?
  • Why are houses insulated with material in the walls instead of just empty space?
  • Why is this insulated material often foil-backed?
  • Is a light-colored roof or a dark-colored roof more energy efficient?
the flow of heat35
The Flow of Heat
  • In conduction, heat flows through a material when objects at different temperatures are placed in contact with one another.
the flow of heat36
The Flow of Heat

(Conduction Contd.)

  • The rate of heat flow depends on the temperature difference between the objects.
  • It also depends on the thermal conductivity of the materials, a measure of how well the materials conduct heat.
  • For example, a metal block at room temperature will feel colder than a wood block of the exact same temperature.
  • The metal block is a better thermal conductor, so heat flows more readily from your hand into the metal.
  • Since contact with the metal cools your hand more rapidly, the metal feels colder.
the flow of heat37
The Flow of Heat
  • In convection, heat is transferred by the motion of a fluid containing thermal energy.
    • Convection is the main method of heating a house.
    • It is also the main method heat is lost from buildings.
the flow of heat38
The Flow of Heat
  • In radiation, heat energy is transferred by electromagnetic waves.
    • The electromagnetic waves involved in the transfer of heat lie primarily in the infrared portion of the spectrum.
    • Unlike conduction and convection, which both require a medium to travel through, radiation can take place across a vacuum.
    • For example, the evacuated space in a thermos bottle.
    • The radiation is reduced to a minimum by silvering the facing walls of the evacuated space.
blackbody radiation problem
Blackbody Radiation Problem

Raleigh

Boltzmann

Wein

slide40

Nobel Prizes and Blackbody Radiation

Wein 1911 Wein’s Law

Planck 1918 QM Idea of Photons

Einstein 1921 QM and Black bodies

Hess 1936 Cosmic Radiation

Wilson & Penzais 1978 Cosmic Background Radiation

NASA 2006 Cosmic Background Radiation

Einstein

blackbody radiation problem41

lmax

Energy density (J/cm3)

Wavelength (mm)

All bodies at T>0 K emit EM radiation. This process is called blackbody radiation. The hotter the body, the more intensity and the higher the average frequency of the emitted light.

Observations:

Blackbody Radiation Problem

Blackbody radiation spectrum depends only on the temperature of the surfaces of the object.

Stephan-Boltzmann Law:

Wien’s law

The peak wavelength is

heat transfer and the greenhouse effect
Heat Transfer and the Greenhouse Effect

What heat-flow processes are involved in the greenhouse effect?

physics of technology
Physics of Technology

Next Lab/Demo: Fluid Dynamics

Temperature

Thursday 1:30-2:45

ESLC 46

Ch 9 and 10

Next Class: Wednesday 10:30-11:20

BUS 318 room

Review Ch 10