Physical Activity Initiatives with Older Adults - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

kyra-boone
physical activity initiatives with older adults n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Physical Activity Initiatives with Older Adults PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Physical Activity Initiatives with Older Adults

play fullscreen
1 / 89
Download Presentation
Physical Activity Initiatives with Older Adults
191 Views
Download Presentation

Physical Activity Initiatives with Older Adults

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Physical Activity Initiatives with Older Adults A Canadian Perspective Whistler, B.C. December 10, 2001

  2. Our Challenges • “It is surely a great criticism of our profession that we have not organized a critical summary, by specialty of sub-specialty, adapted periodically, of all relevant randomized controlled trials.” • Archie Cochrane

  3. Our Challenges • Clear Lake Agreement by Federal, Provincial, & Territorial Ministers responsible for fitness, active living, recreation set a joint target to reduce physical inactivity in Canadians by 10% from 1998-2003

  4. Active Old Age • Director General of the World Health Organization described gains in life expectancy as one of humanity’s greatest achievements • Living a full life to reach a healthy, happy and active old age is our aspiration

  5. Between Friends

  6. Not Aging but Saging …Wise Beyond Your Years • It might not affect you now, but it will. • Growing older is inevitable.

  7. Dignity, Respect, Independence and Control • The importance of older people being able to maintain control and autonomy in their lives must not be lost

  8. Definition of Older Adult • Self-defining (Active Living Coalition for Older Adults) • Varies depending upon initiative • 50-55+ for many initiatives (Physical Activity Guide)

  9. Aging Population - Facts • Being physically active reduces the risk of heart disease, fall and injuries, obesity, high blood pressure, adult-onset diabetes, osteoporosis, stroke, depression, colon cancer and premature death • One-third of older adults face an increased risk of loss of mobility and functional capacity, thereby decreasing their functional independence

  10. Aging Population Facts • 1 in 10 Canadians is an older adult • This number will double by 2021 • The greatest health risk for older adults is sedentary living (WHO, 1997) • Among adults 55 + only 34% of men and 29% of women are physically active • Among adults 74+ only 29% of men and 19% of women are physically active

  11. The Older Adult Audience • 50% of seniors report physical activity of 15 min. or more at least 12/month • Almost 2/3 of those aged 80+report needing no help with daily tasks • Only 16% of older adults use the Internet • Once online Canadian seniors use the Internet on average 12 hours weekly

  12. The Older Adult Audience • 1/3 of Canadian seniors live in rural areas and small towns, the rest in urban areas • 93% of seniors live in private households • 20% of Canadians 65+ have post-secondary diploma or degree • 60% did not finish high school • Considerable number have difficulty with reading

  13. By 2041…. • 46% have a disability but for most part continue to enjoy and active lifestyle in their communities • For those born in 1998 life expectancy increased to 92 for men and 100 for women • By 2041 number of Canadians over 80 will quadruple

  14. Why Older Adults are not as Physically Active • Accessibility • Safety • Security • Support • Motivational issues • Must be addressed to encourage, support and ensure that opportunities exist that facilitate involvement in Active Living

  15. Aging and Communication • Visual acuity • Hearing acuity • Agility & Mobility • Social/emotional changes

  16. Barriers to Reaching Older Adults • Physical changes of aging • Stereotypes, outdated assumptions about older adults lifestyles, interests, capabilities • Communication materials and media not suited to audience

  17. Initiatives • Physical Activity Guide for Older Adults • -individuals & leaders, practitioners • Moving through the Years – A Blueprint for Action for Active Living and Older Adults • Policy, decision makers • Evidence Based Clinical Guidelines for Osteoporosis • Physicians (Specialists/ GP,FP), Other Allied Health Professionals

  18. Canada’s Physical Activity Guide for Older Adults • The Guide and the accompanying handbook are the Canadian standard for physical activity and older adults • Based on prototype of Physical Activity Guide for Canadians and Canada’s Food Guide • Bilingual (French & English)

  19. Canada’s Physical Activity Guide for Older Adults • Developed over 3 years • Done in partnership with the Active Living Coalition for Older Adults (ALCOA), Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology and Health Canada • Launched in May 1999 • Multi-disciplinary national advisory committee which included older adults • Focus testing with both older adults and health professionals in urban and rural settings

  20. Canada’s Physical Activity Guide for Older Adults • Guide and Handbook underwent numerous reviews by a group of scientific experts • Guide and handbook used by leaders, health providers and program delivers • Guide includes tips to getting started, how much activity is enough, health benefits, and examples of endurance, flexibility, strength and balance activities to choose from • Launched in conjunction with the “Blueprint for Action”

  21. Canada’s Physical Activity Guide for Older Adults Challenges • Retain scientific validity • Retaining balance between consumer wants & needs and what science says • Marketing of message had to be simple, realistic, believeable, and inspiring • Attaining the outcomes & benefits while making goal attractive & attainable • Carry a message to audience that was clear and user friendly

  22. Canada’s Physical Activity Guide for Older Adults Challenges • Simple Messages: Age is no barrier • Be Active, Your Way, Every Day for Life • Every little bit helps, but more is better • Add it up principle • Moderate physical activity most days for 30-60 minutes • Choice of activities from each of three activity groups: • Endurance, Flexibility, Strength & Balance

  23. Canada’s Physical Activity Guide for older adults • Science based facts (benefits/risks) • Why do this and what is in it for you • Variety & Safety concerns (start where you can) • Overcoming barriers • Pull out Guide to put on refrigerator • Sample calendar/planning sheet • Stories/Real people (not cartoons) • Next steps planner

  24. Canada’s Physical Activity Guide for older adults - Barriers • I feel too tired to get started • I don’t want to exercise? I’ve worked hard all my life, not its time to relax • I have arthritis or stiff joints? • I have osteoporosis? • I have concerns about my heart? I’m afraid that physical activity will do more harm than good

  25. Canada’s Physical Activity Guide for older adults - Barriers • I don’t have much time…so which activity is best? • I am unsteady on my feet? • I am afraid to go out in winter?

  26. What’s Different • Size of print • Benefits right up front • Real people • Practical user friendly suggestions • Talk about barriers (tell it like it is) • Safety • Refers individuals to their physician or health professional

  27. What’s Different • Lots of white space • Bold headings • Clear Language • Stories of real people

  28. Key Learning from the Guide • Senior friendliness is an attitude based on considering seniors’ needs and respecting seniors’ contributions • Physicians are credible influencers of individual’s health behaviours for older adults • Design communication with your clients not for them.

  29. Canada’s Physical Activity Guide for Older Adults • An excellent example of how consensus statements and research can be translated into simple clear messaging for the target audience

  30. Canada’s Physical Activity Guide for Older Adults • Outcomes • Over 50 National organizations endorsed the Guide • Over 2 million copies have been printed and distributed

  31. College of Family PhysiciansKey Influencers • Adopted a Physical Activity and Health Strategy • Developed a unique video on active ageing • Physicians learn more about barriers to PA • Describes new counseling & training tools • New Practice-based Small Group Learning Module on PA & older adults • For info email pmaturano@cfpc.ca

  32. Moving Through The Years:A Blueprint for Action Goal to update 1991 original Blueprint • Fondation en Adaptation Motrice, ALCOA and Health Canada conducted survey in 22 communities across Canada and over 20 NGO’s • Over 450 individuals consulted (over half of whom were older adults) • Launched in 1999 in International Year of Older Persons

  33. Moving Through The Years:A Blueprint for Action • A national framework for plan of action • Provides a collective direction for current and future initiatives • A tool for planned change • ALCOA asked to serve as the keeper of the Blueprint to ensure its uptake • Serves as a base for ALCOA’s goals and objectives

  34. Active Living Coalition for Older Adults • In 1993 three older adult national bodies came together (National Walking Campaign, Secretariat for Fitness for the Third Age, The Older Adult Active Living Association) • Became Active Living Coalition for Older Adults (ALCOA) • Mandate to bring together national organizations & researchers working with older Canadians in Active Living

  35. Moving Through The Years:A Blueprint for Action • Nine Guiding Principles based on the vision of : • An active society where all older Canadians are leading active lifestyles thereby contributing to their physical and overall well-being.

  36. Moving Through The Years:A Blueprint for Action • Principle 1 • It is recognized that active living is essential for daily living and a cornerstone of health and a quality of life.

  37. Moving Through The Years:A Blueprint for Action • Principle 2: • There is a need for more positive attitudes toward aging, with realistic images that depict older adults as respected, valued, and physically active members of society.

  38. Moving Through The Years:A Blueprint for Action • Principle 3: • Older adults should be encouraged to participate in decision-making and leadership positions, in all phases of program/service development and delivery.

  39. Moving Through The Years:A Blueprint for Action • Principle 5: • Issues, needs and interests of older adults in their community need to be identified, and accessible, affordable active living activities and programs designed to meet these needs.

  40. Moving Through The Years:A Blueprint for Action • Principle 6: • While it is recognized that both aging and learning are a life-long process, it is appreciated that for some, pre-retirement years may be a key time to re-focus on active living and well-being.

  41. Moving Through The Years:A Blueprint for Action • Principle 7: • Canada is a society for all ages: Programs and services should be developed which accommodate older adults’ choice to be with others.

  42. Moving Through The Years:A Blueprint for Action • Principle 8: • There is a need to identify, support, and share research priorities that apply to active living and aging.

  43. Moving Through The Years:A Blueprint for Action • Principle 9: • There is a need for education and promotion of the health benefits of active living as a way of life for older adults

  44. Areas of emphasis for active living and older adults • Increase public awareness about the benefits of active living • Develop competent leaders in active living who can meet the needs & interests of older adults • Ensure resources and social supports needed to be active are in place • Strengthen delivery systems and improve levels of cooperation, coordination, and communication among organizations

  45. Areas of emphasis for active living and older adults • Encourage and enable older adults to advocate for the right to a quality of life that includes physical activity • Identify, support, and share research priorities and results on aging and active living • Continually monitor and evaluate programs, services and outcomes to ensure that active living needs, interests, and concerns of older adults are met

  46. Blueprint Implementation Summit • In 1999 Blueprint implementation Summit held • Over 50 national and provincial organizations attended along with other stakeholders • Resulted in five priority areas: • Leadership Development • Shared Research in Plain Language • Marketing and Communications • Influencing Policy • Coordination and Capacity Building

  47. Leadership Development • ALCOA providing strategic leadership • Develop a network of community presenters to conduct workshops with older adults • Develop strong delivery system at the community level through the members of ALCOA • Presenting to seniors groups and organizations to promote the Guide and the Blueprint and to highlight local opportunities in each community to be active

  48. Communicating Research in Plain Language • ALCOA Research Update Launched May 2001 • Goal to interpret current leading edge research into user friendly, plan language format • Included in Research Update is a special Active Living Tips sheet for older adults • Copies available

  49. Marketing & Communications • Includes ALCOA’s website, newsletter, electronic listserv, national spokesperson and a framework for affecting change • Provides an opportunity to share information, network, learn and reach older adults with consistent active living messages

  50. Influencing Policy • ALCOA partners with key member groups and stakeholders • ALCOA to develop information to members of parliament/policy and decision makers to influence and promote the priority of active living opportunities for older adults