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Welcome to Mr. B’s Homeroom ! - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


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Welcome to Mr. B’s Homeroom !. About Me. Lance Patrick Blanford Born January 7 th , 1984 Engaged to Rachel Cochran One-year-old daughter, Laken Presly Blanford Graduated from University of Kentucky Currently seeking Masters in Special Education from Campbellsville University

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about me
About Me
  • Lance Patrick Blanford
  • Born January 7th, 1984
  • Engaged to Rachel Cochran
  • One-year-old daughter, LakenPreslyBlanford
  • Graduated from University of Kentucky
  • Currently seeking Masters in Special Education from Campbellsville University
  • From Bardstown, Ky
  • Favorite Pastime – Play with my daughter and exercise
  • Favorite Food – Ice Cream
motivating question
Motivating Question
  • How can I ensure that students receive the necessary classroom structure that will allow them to not only learn the core content, but will also teach them discipline, respect and responsibility that will, in turn, assist them in becoming successful members of society?
a cooperative process
A Cooperative Process
  • Educators should guide children through the process of learning. This process should be a cooperative process between the student and the teacher. The teacher can lay the groundwork for this cooperative process by making it a priority to understand students’ diverse learning styles and behaviors.
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Classroom

Expectations

classroom expectations
Classroom Expectations
  • These expectations should ensure students’ safety and protect students’ rights, especially their right to an appropriate education.
  • It is critical that these expectations are developed early on in the school year. The expectations should then be implemented fairly and consistently.
foundational principles as they apply to education
Foundational Principles As They apply to Education
  • Freedom –Students should have the freedom to accept and embrace the person they are without criticism or ridicule.
  • Justice – Students should be subject to fair classroom expectations. If necessary, modifications should be made.
  • Equality – Students have a right to an equal opportunity to learn.

“Does not mean treating every student the same” – Forrest Gathercoal

development of classroom expectations
Development of Classroom Expectations
  • Develop expectations early.

“Classroom studies have shown that the level of order created during the first few days of school reliably predicts the degree of student engagement and disruption for the rest of the year (Emmer, Evertson, and Anderson, 1980).

development of classroom expectations1
Development of Classroom Expectations

2) Facilitate conversation on how foundational principles apply to student safety, classroom order, and academic success.

  • What is harassment and bullying? Why should harassment and bullying be against classroom rules?
  • Why is it important to respect school property? Others property? Your Property?
  • Why is it important to come to class prepared and on time?
  • Why is it important that all students receive an appropriate education free from interruptions?
development of classroom expectations2
Development of Classroom Expectations

3) Based on the conversation, have students develop their own classroom expectations.

  • Break the class up into groups and assign each group a topic and ask them to construct a classroom expectation on that topic.
  • Groups will present expectation to class and explain how it relates to the foundational principles.
development of classroom expectations3
Development of Classroom Expectations

4) Students will revise expectation or vote to adopt the classroom expectation.

  • If students agree that the expectation is fair, positive, and appropriate, they will vote to adopt it.
development of classroom expectations4
Development of Classroom Expectations

5) Students and parents sign agreement to classroom expectations.

  • After the list of expectations is complete students and parents will sign that they agree with the expectations. This will increase student and parent buy-in which will make the expectations more effective.
development of classroom expectations5
Development of Classroom Expectations

6) Post classroom expectations.

  • List of expectations will be posted in a prominent place in the classroom, so that they serve as a reminder and motivator to students for the rest of the year.
slide18

Intervention and

Consequences

intervention and consequences
Intervention and Consequences
  • First Offense –
    • Warning
    • Behavior Modification Questions
      • What class/teacher expectation did you break?
      • What class/teacher expectation did you break?
      • Why is it important to follow that expectation?
      • What is your plan to change/stop the behavior?
      • What will happen if you do not meet this expectation again?
      • B-Bucks may be deducted.
intervention and consequences1
Intervention and Consequences
  • Second Offense –
    • Loss of privileges may occur. (limited/no recess, assigned seating, etc)
    • Depending on severity of infraction in-class isolation, in-school intervention, or after school detention may be issued.
    • B-bucks will be deducted.
intervention and consequences2
Intervention and Consequences
  • Third Offense –
    • Loss of privileges will occur.
    • In-class isolation, in-school intervention, or after-school detention may be issued.
    • B-bucks will be deducted.
    • Note may be sent home to parent.
intervention and consequences3
Intervention and Consequences
  • Fourth Offense –
    • If all other teacher attempts prove to be unsuccessful, a parent will be contacted and parent/teacher conference will be scheduled to discuss inappropriate behavior and a plan to correct the behavior will be established
    • In-class isolation, in-school intervention, or after-school detention may be issued.
    • B-bucks will be deducted.
what are b bucks
What are B-Bucks?
  • A B-Buck is fake classroom currency that the students will be awarded for classroom conduct, academic achievement, and following the Golden Rule. The students will be able to purchase educational materials and novelty items from the B-Store using their B-Bucks.
slide24

A Safe, Productive and

Accommodating

Environment

a safe productive and accommodating environment
A Safe, Productive and Accommodating Environment

This type of environment is critical to maximizing student behavioral and academic effort.

a safe productive and accommodating environment1
A Safe, Productive and Accommodating Environment
  • Preferential Seating

Students will be assigned seating in order to reduce distractions, increase student engagement, and assist in academic success.

a safe productive and accommodating environment2
A Safe, Productive and Accommodating Environment
  • Increase Organization/Decrease Distractions

Classroom decorations and materials are organized so that the environment remains structured, distractions are limited, and the students’ attention can be maintained.

a safe productive and accommodating environment3
A Safe, Productive and Accommodating Environment
  • Classroom Layout

The classroom has been designed to limit distractions and maximize student engagement. Students will be able to interact with the teacher and other classmates with ease. Students will be able to clearly see lessons and presentations conducted on the whiteboard.

slide29

The End

“Guidelines and decisions based on democratic principles and consequences grounded in a professional relationship help bring students to a principled level of thinking. This reasoned and considerate approach to rules and consequences provides students with a paradigm they take to other social situations. There is a significant difference between learning obedience through rules and consequences designed to force behavioral changes and learning civil responsibility through the empowering language and discourse of professional educators. A democratic school experience is about developing learning goals with students designed to enhance character and courage which will hopefully provide them a presence of mind for living a life of equability and self-control.” - Forrest Gathercoal

slide30

Resources

  • Alberto, Paul A., and Anne Troutman. Applied Behavior Analysis for Teachers. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Education Inc., 2009.
  • "Classroom Arrangement Checklist." TeacherVision . 2012. 23 Jan. 2012. <http://www.teachervision.fen.com/classroom-management/printable/7240.html>.
  • "Caring and Control: Create a Safe, Positive Environment." Teaching Channel. 2012. 19 Jan. 2012. <https://www.teachingchannel.org/videos/caring-and-control-create-a-safe-positive-classroom?fd=0>.
  • Doyle, W. (1990). Themes in teacher education research. In W. R. Houston (Ed.), Handbook of Research on Teacher Education, (pp. 3-23). NY: MacMillian.
  • Emmer, E., Evertson, C., & Anderson, L. (1980). Effective management at the beginning of the school year. Elementary School Journal, 80, 219-231.
  • Gathercoal, Forrest . "Professional Educators and Democratic Classrooms."Judicious Discipline. 5 Mar. 2011. 16 Jan. 2012. <http://www.dock.net/gathercoal/judicious_discipline.html>.
  • Gump, P. V. (1982). "School Settings and Their Keeping." In Helping Teachers Manage Classrooms, edited by D. Duke. Alexandria, Va.: Association for Supervision and Cumculum Development.
  • Jones, Vern, and Louise Jones. Comprehensive Classroom Management. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Education Inc., 2010.
  • Mather, N. . "Behavior Modification in the Classroom." LDonline. 2010. 18 Jan. 2012. <http://www.ldonline.org/article/6030/>.
  • Mcleod, S. A. (2007). Simply Psychology; . Retrieved 4 February 2012, from http://www.simplypsychology.org/operant-conditioning.html
  • Thorson, S. (2003). Listening to students: Reflections on secondary classroom management. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
  • Weinstein, C. (1979). The physical environment of the school: A review of the research. Review of Educational Research, 49(4), 577-610.