Unit 8B: Motivation and Emotion: Emotions, Stress and Health - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Unit 8B: Motivation and Emotion: Emotions, Stress and Health
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Unit 8B: Motivation and Emotion: Emotions, Stress and Health

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  1. Unit 8B:Motivation and Emotion: Emotions, Stress and Health

  2. Unit Overview • Theories of Emotion • Embodied Emotion • Expressed Emotion • Experienced Emotion • Stress and Health Click on the any of the above hyperlinks to go to that section in the presentation.

  3. Theories of Emotion

  4. Theories of emotions • Emotion • Physiological arousal • Expressive behavior • Conscious experience • Common sense theory

  5. Theories of emotions • James-Lange theory

  6. Theories of emotions • Cannon-Bard theory

  7. Theories of emotions • Two-factor theory • Schachter-Singer

  8. Theories of emotions

  9. Embodied Emotion

  10. Emotions and the Autonomic Nervous System • Autonomic nervous system • Sympathetic nervous system • arousing • Parasympathetic nervous system • Calming • Moderate arousal is ideal

  11. Emotions and the Autonomic Nervous System

  12. Physiological Similarities Among Specific Emotions • Different movie experiment

  13. Physiological Differences Among Specific Emotions • Differences in brain activity • Amygdala • Frontal lobes • Nucleus accumbens • Polygraph

  14. Cognition and EmotionCognition Can Define Emotion • Spill over effect • Schachter-Singer experiment • Arousal fuels emotions, cognition channels it

  15. Cognition and EmotionCognition Does Not Always Precede Emotion • Influence of the amygdala

  16. Expressed Emotion

  17. Detecting Emotion • Nonverbal cues • Duchenne smile

  18. Gender, Emotion, and Nonverbal Behavior

  19. Gender, Emotion, and Nonverbal Behavior

  20. Culture and Emotional Expression

  21. Levels of Analysis for the Study of Emotion

  22. The Effects of Facial Expressions • Facial feedback

  23. Experienced Emotion

  24. Fear • Adaptive value of fear • The biology of fear • amygdala

  25. Anger • Anger • Evoked by events • Catharsis • Expressing anger can increase anger

  26. Happiness • Happiness • Feel-good, do-good phenomenon • Well-being

  27. HappinessThe Short Life of Emotional Ups and Downs • Watson’s studies

  28. HappinessWealth and Well-Being

  29. HappinessWealth and Well-Being

  30. HappinessTwo Psychological Phenomena: Adaptation and Comparison • Happiness and Prior Experience • Adaptation-level phenomenon • Happiness and others’ attainments • Relative deprivation

  31. HappinessPredictors of Happiness

  32. Stress and Health

  33. Introduction • Health psychology • Behavioral medicine

  34. Stress and Illness • Stress • Stress appraisal

  35. Stress and IllnessThe Stress Response System • Selye’s general adaptation syndrome (GAS) • Alarm • Resistance • exhaustion

  36. Stress and IllnessGeneral Adaptation Syndrome

  37. Stress and IllnessStressful Life Events • Catastrophes • Significant life changes • Daily hassles

  38. Stress and the Heart • Coronary heart disease • Type A versus Type B • Type A • Type B

  39. Stress and Susceptibility to Disease • Psychophysiological illnesses • Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI) • Lymphocytes • B lymphocytes • T lymphocytes • Stress and AIDS • Stress and Cancer

  40. The End

  41. Definition Slides

  42. Emotion = a response of the whole organism, involving (1) physiological arousal, (2) expressive behaviors, and (3) conscious experience.

  43. James-Lange Theory = the theory that our experience of emotion is our awareness of our physiological responses to emotion-arousing stimuli.

  44. Cannon-Bard Theory = the theory that an emotion-arousing stimulus simultaneously triggers (1) physiological responses and (2) the subjective experience of emotion.

  45. Two-factor Theory = the Schachter-Singer theory that to experience emotion one must (1) be physically aroused and (2) cognitively label the arousal.

  46. Polygraph = a machine, commonly used in attempts to detect lies, that measure several of the physiological responses accompanying emotion (such as perspiration and cardiovascular and breathing changes).

  47. Facial Feedback = the effect of facial expressions on experienced emotions, as when a facial expression of anger or happiness intensifies feelings of anger or happiness.

  48. Catharsis = emotional release. The catharsis hypothesis maintains that “releasing’ aggressive energy (through action or fantasy) relieves aggressive urges.

  49. Feel-Good Do-Good Phenomenon = people’s tendency to be helpful when already in a good mood.

  50. Well-being = self-perceived happiness or satisfaction with life. Used along with measures of objective well-being (for example, physical and economic indicators) to evaluate people’s quality of life.