Download
simple compound sentences n.
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Simple/Compound Sentences PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Simple/Compound Sentences

Simple/Compound Sentences

148 Views Download Presentation
Download Presentation

Simple/Compound Sentences

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript

  1. Simple/Compound Sentences Ms. Christie 2013-2014

  2. Sentences • Sentences are groups of words that have a subject and a predicate. • Sentences express a complete thought. • EX: Ms. Christie spills her coffee daily.

  3. Simple Sentences • A simple sentence has one complete subject and one complete predicate. • Complete Subject: Names whom or what the sentence is about. • Complete Predicate: Tells what the subject does or has or what the subject is or is like.

  4. Simple Sentences

  5. Simple Sentence Examples • Most students are super awesome humans. • Most students are super awesome humans. complete subject complete predicate

  6. Compound Sentences • A compound sentence is a sentence that contains two or more connected simple sentences. Each simple sentence in a compound sentence is called a main clause. • A main clause has a subject and predicate and can stand alone as a sentence.

  7. Compound sentences • Many people find baby pigs adorable, and many others enjoy dressing pigs in outfits. • Many people find baby pigs adorable, and many others enjoy dressing pigs in outfits.

  8. Compound sentence examples • Millions of people live in the cities, but many others reside in the suburbs. • Most people travel to work, and many of them use public transportation. • Helicopters can be used to monitor traffic conditions, or computers can more accurately predict traveling time.

  9. Comma rule • Which comma rule comes into play with compound sentences? • And-but-or? Put the comma before! • Millions of people live in the cities, but many others reside in the suburbs. • Most people travel to work, and many of them use public transportation. • Helicopters can be used to monitor traffic conditions, or computers can more accurately predict traveling time.

  10. Comma Rule Continued • If no ‘and-but-or’, use a semicolon to join sentences. • People take trains, buses, and cars; some even fly.

  11. Simple/compound practice • The state of Illinois lies below Wisconsin. • Simple • In 2001, a very important person graduated from Homer Junior High School. • Simple • She went on to become a teacher, and she came back to teach at Homer Junior High School. • Compound

  12. Way to go, mustangs!