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The Word Is Alive The Gospel of Luke. Chapter Thirteen Presented by Tony Gillon. Chapter Thirteen. Luke 9:51–19:27 - The Journey to Jerusalem (continues). Chapter Thirteen. Luke 9:51–19:27 - The Journey to Jerusalem (continues) Luke 9:51–13:21 -

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The Word Is Alive The Gospel of Luke


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the word is alive the gospel of luke

The Word Is AliveThe Gospel of Luke

Chapter Thirteen

Presented by Tony Gillon

chapter thirteen
Chapter Thirteen
  • Luke 9:51–19:27 -
  • The Journey to Jerusalem (continues)
chapter thirteen1
Chapter Thirteen
  • Luke 9:51–19:27 -
  • The Journey to Jerusalem (continues)
  • Luke 9:51–13:21 -
  • The first mention of the journey to Jerusalem
  • (continues/concludes)
the journey to jerusalem
The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Summary of Chapter Thirteen
  • A person’s suffering is not necessarily linked to their personal sin.
the journey to jerusalem1
The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Summary of Chapter Thirteen
  • A person’s suffering is not necessarily linked to their personal sin.
  • Healing on the Sabbath.
the journey to jerusalem2
The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Summary of Chapter Thirteen
  • A person’s suffering is not necessarily linked to their personal sin.
  • Healing on the Sabbath.
  • Comparisons with the Kingdom of God.
the journey to jerusalem3
The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Luke 13:1–5 – Repent or perish
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Luke 13:1–5 – Repent or perish
  • Jesus instructs his disciples that misfortune is not linked to personal sin but that all will die and face judgement. Therefore, they must know of the need to repent in this life.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 1 Now there were some present at that time who told Jesus about the Galilæanswhose blood Pilate had mixed with their sacrifices. 2 Jesus answered, Do you think that these Galilæans were worse sinners than all the other Galilæans because they suffered this way? 3 I tell you, no! But unless you repent, you too will all perish.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 4 Or those eighteen who died when the tower in Siloam fell on them — do you think they were more guilty than all the others living in Jerusalem? 5 I tell you, no! But unless you repent, you too will all perish.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • The incidents concerning Pilate killing the Galilæans and the fall of the tower in Siloam are not recorded elsewhere in scripture.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • The reference to these Galilæans is not clear.
  • Some believe they may be supporters of Judas of Galilee.
  • After him, Judas the Galilean appeared in the days of the census and led a band of people in revolt. He too was killed, and all his followers were scattered (Acts 5:37).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Whose blood Pilate had mixed is an incident about which nothing more is known but Pilate had apparently put people to death when they were trying to offer sacrifices.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Do you thinkworse sinners? Jesus’ rhetorical question reflects a popular view that tragedies and physical ailments were due to personal sin but his answer no denies any such connection in this case.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • The question reflects the assumption, customary in ancient Judaism, that suffering could be traced to sin.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Unless you repent, you too will perish:
  • Although Jesus regularly has compassion on those who suffer, here he draws a broader lesson: this tragic event is a warning that final judgment is coming to the entire world.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Unless you repent, you too will perish:
  • Although Jesus regularly has compassion on those who suffer, here he draws a broader lesson: this tragic event is a warning that final judgment is coming to the entire world.
  • The tower in Siloam was probably part of the wall of Jerusalem near the pool of Siloam.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Moreover, no man knows when his hour will come: As fish are caught in a cruel net, or birds are taken in a snare, so men are trapped by evil times that fall unexpectedly upon them (Ecclesiastes 9:12).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Luke 13:6–9 –
  • Parable of a fig tree in a vineyard
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Luke 13:6–9 –
  • Parable of a fig tree in a vineyard
  • In this parable we learn that people are being judged by their fruit. Those that are not fruitful, that is, have not come to God, will be cut down or find themselves in eternal separation. Jesus has come to extend the time before judgement comes but it is not an infinite time.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 6 Then he told this parable: A man had a fig-tree, planted in his vineyard, and he went to look for fruit on it, but did not find any. 7 So he said to the man who took care of the vineyard, ‘For three years now I’ve been coming to look for fruit on this fig-tree and haven’t found any. Cut it down! Why should it use up the soil?’
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 8 ‘Sir’, the man replied, ‘leave it alone for one more year, and I’ll dig round it and fertilise it. 9 If it bears fruit next year, fine! If not, then cut it down’.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 8 ‘Sir’, the man replied, ‘leave it alone for one more year, and I’ll dig round it and fertilise it. 9 If it bears fruit next year, fine! If not, then cut it down’.
  • This parable, which extends Matthew 3:10, symbolises Israel’s last opportunity to repent before experiencing God’s judgment.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Three years signifies that Israel has had enough time to repent.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Three years signifies that Israel has had enough time to repent.
  • Sirleave it alone for one more year. The period of grace and opportunity is extended but only for a limited time.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Dig round it implies loosening the soil so that water can flow easily to the roots. If the fig tree does not respond it will be cutdown.
  • God’s graciousness and patience should not be presumed upon.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Fertilise it:
  • This indicates the preaching of the Gospel so that people may hear and receive the word of God and be saved if they choose to accept the message it contains.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • God is the man who owns the fig tree, Jesus the dresser and the fig tree is Israel.
  • The Father has seen no fruit from calling his people to repentance for an extended period of time and has decided to cast them aside but the intercession of Christ offers the extension of a further period of time.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Normally, fig trees grow by the wayside:
  • Seeing a fig-tree by the road.
  • (Matthew 21:19).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • I will sing for the one I love a song about his vineyard: My loved one had a vineyard on a fertile hillside. He dug it up and cleared it of stones and planted it with the choicest vines. He built a watchtower in it and cut out a winepress as well. Then he looked for a crop of good grapes, but it yielded only bad fruit>(Isaiah 5:1-2).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Our baptism plants us in Christ’s vineyard, where he dresses us, feeds us, waters us and prunes us.
  • In return, he expects us to bear good fruit, not just leaves or blossom.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Three years could be the ministry of Jesus or the three periods of grace given to Israel: pre-Babylon in the Promised Land; the return after exile; and then the preaching of John the Baptist, followed immediately by the coming of the Messiah making the third and final offering.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Now I will tell you what I am going to do to my vineyard: I will take away its hedge, and it will be destroyed; I will break down its wall, and it will be trampled. I will make it a wasteland, neither pruned nor cultivated, and briers and thorns will grow there. I will command the clouds not to rain on it.
  • (Isaiah 5:5-6).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • If anyone does not remain in me, he is like a branch that is thrown away and withers; such branches are picked up, thrown into the fire and burned (John 15:6).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Although Christ is still primarily the dresser of the vine, much of the work is passed on to his disciples.
  • The prayer he gives in the parable is for an extension of time but not for an indefinite period, so time is of the essence for us.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • He cuts off every branch in me that bears no fruit, while every branch that does bear fruit he prunes so that it will be even more fruitful(John 15:2).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Luke 13:10–17 -
  • A crippled woman healed on the Sabbath
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Luke 13:10–17 -
  • A crippled woman healed on the Sabbath
  • Whereas the incidents recorded in Luke 6:1–5, the disciples picking heads of grain; and Luke 6:6–11, healing a shrivelled hand; 
  • involve Jesus’ Lordship over the Sabbath, this account involves the meaning of the Sabbath.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 10 On a Sabbath Jesus was teaching in one of the synagogues, 11 and a woman was there who had been crippled by a spirit for eighteen years. She was bent over and could not straighten up at all.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Crippled by a spirit:
  • Jesus was driving out a demon that was mute. When the demon left, the man who had been mute spoke, and the crowd was amazed (Luke 11:14).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 12 When Jesus saw her, he called her forward and said to her, Woman, you are set free from your infirmity. 13 Then he put his hands on her, and immediatelyshe straightened up and praised God.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Immediately is in contrast with the 18 years of disability and magnifies Jesus’ miracle-working power.
  • Immediately he received his sight and followed Jesus, praising God. When all the people saw it, they also praised God.
  • (Luke 18:43).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • She straightened up:
  • I am bowed down and brought very low; all day long I go about mourning (Psalm 38:6).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • She straightened up:
  • I am bowed down and brought very low; all day long I go about mourning (Psalm 38:6).
  • The LORD gives sight to the blind, the LORD lifts up those who are bowed down, the LORD loves the righteous (Psalm 146:8).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • She straightened up:
  • I am bowed down and brought very low; all day long I go about mourning (Psalm 38:6).
  • The LORD gives sight to the blind, the LORD lifts up those who are bowed down, the LORD loves the righteous (Psalm 146:8).
  • Consider what God has done: Who can straighten what he has made crooked? (Ecclesiastes 7:13).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 14 Indignant because Jesus had healed on the Sabbath, the synagogue ruler said to the people, There are six days for work. So come and be healed on those days, not on the Sabbath.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • A Synagogue ruleris often a board member of the synagogue or more likely a layman who presided over the affairs of the synagogue, including organising and teaching in synagogue services.
  • Many of them were Pharisees.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Because Jesus had healed on the Sabbath the ruler’s indignation was aroused, completely ignoring the woman’s being freed from 18 years of suffering.
  • Jesus was not violating any OT commandment but later Jewish traditions had added many more commandments and prohibitions that God had never given in his Word.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 15 The Lord answered him, You hypocrites! Doesn’t each of you on the Sabbath untie his ox or donkey from the stall and lead it out to give it water? 16 Then should not this woman, a daughter of Abraham, whom Satan has kept bound for eighteen long years, be set free on the Sabbath day from what bound her?
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • You hypocrites:
  • How can you say to your brother, ‘Brother, let me take the speck out of your eye’, when you yourself fail to see the plank in your own eye? You hypocrite, first take the plank out of your eye, and then you will see clearly to remove the speck from your brother’s eye. (Luke 6:42).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Hypocrites! You know how to interpret the appearance of the earth and the sky. How is it that you don’t know how to interpret this present time? (Luke 12:56).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Doesn’t each of you introduces a lesser to greater argument which we have encountered in Luke Chapters 11 & 12 in which the generally accepted practice of caring for animals on the Sabbath underscores the greater need to show such concern for a daughter of Abraham.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 17 When he said this, all his opponents were humiliated, but the people were delighted with all the wonderful things he was doing.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 17 When he said this, all his opponents were humiliated, but the people were delighted with all the wonderful things he was doing.
  • Although humiliated Jesus opponents will not see the error of their ways and turn to him. That people were delighted does not necessarily indicate that all turned to Jesus in faith.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Luke 13:18–21 -
  • The Parables of the mustard seed and the yeast
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Luke 13:18–21 -
  • The Parables of the mustard seed and the yeast
  • Luke concludes his first section on Jesus’ journey to Jerusalem, Luke 9:51–13:21, with two parables emphasising the arrival of the kingdom. They contrast the kingdom’s modest beginning and its glorious final state.
  • This passage can be confirmed by reading Matthew 13:31-33.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 18 Then Jesus asked, What is the kingdom of God like? What shall I compare it to? 19 It is like a mustard seed, which a man took and planted in his garden. It grew and became a tree, and the birds of the air perched in its branches.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • The seed became a tree refers to a large herbal plant that grows to the height of 8 to 12 feet or 2.4 to 3.7m.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • The birdsperched emphasises the surprising supernatural result in the growth of the tree.
  • The Kingdom of God would grow in this same way from apparent small beginnings.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • The birdsperched emphasises the surprising supernatural result in the growth of the tree.
  • The Kingdom of God would grow in this same way from apparent small beginnings.
  • With beautiful leaves and abundant fruit, providing food for all, giving shelter to the beasts of the field, and having nesting places in its branches for the birds of the air. (Daniel 4:21).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • The Pharisees wanted and expected cosmic signs to announce the coming of the Kingdom of God and failed to see that it came in a small and discrete way in the way the Christ came into the world the first time.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 20 Again he asked, What shall I compare the kingdom of God to? 21 It is like yeast that a woman took and mixed into a large amount of flour until it worked all through the dough.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • A minute quantity of yeast or leaven can permeate a large amount of dough to produce a large amount of bread.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • A minute quantity of yeast or leaven can permeate a large amount of dough to produce a large amount of bread.
  • Your boasting is not good. Don’t you know that a little yeast works through the whole batch of dough? Get rid of the old yeast that you may be a new batch without yeast — as you really are. For Christ, our Passover lamb, has been sacrificed.
  • (1 Corinthians 5:6–7)
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Some translations say ‘Three measures’fora large amount and this would have produced enough bread to feed 100 people.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • The example of yeast or leaven helps to describe how knowledge of the word of God reaches all parts of the world through the endeavours of disciples and the preparatory work of the Holy Spirit who precedes them:
  • But thanks be to God, who always leads us in triumphal procession in Christ and through us spreads everywhere the fragrance of the knowledge of him (2 Corinthians 2:4).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Luke 13:22–17:10 -
  • The second mention of the journey to Jerusalem
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Luke 13:22–17:10 -
  • The second mention of the journey to Jerusalem
  • This next section begins with a second mention of Jesus’ intention to go to Jerusalem, where he will die for the sins of his people.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Luke 13:22–30 - The narrow door
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Luke 13:22–30 - The narrow door
  • This account from Jesus’ ministry opens with a summary (v.22), a question (v.23), followed by a series of warnings (v.24, vv.25–27 and vv.28–29), and a concluding summary (v.30).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 22 Then Jesus went through the towns and villages, teaching as he made his way to Jerusalem.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Jesus wentteaching, as confirmed in Luke 4:15, 4:31–32 and 4:43–44, and made his way to Jerusalem.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Jesus wentteaching, as confirmed in Luke 4:15, 4:31–32 and 4:43–44, and made his way to Jerusalem.
  • As the time approached for him to be taken up to heaven, Jesus resolutely set out for Jerusalem. And he sent messengers on ahead, who went into a Samaritan village to get things ready for him; but the people there did not welcome him, because he was heading for Jerusalem (Luke 9:51-53).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 23 Someone asked him, Lord, are only a few people going to be saved? He said to them,
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 23 Someone asked him, Lord, are only a few people going to be saved? He said to them,
  • Jesus’ response to the question are only a few people going to be saved? does not speculate on God’s plans and actions but states what individuals should do to be saved.
  • Those who heard this asked, “Who then can be saved?” (Luke 18:26).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • This question may have been a trap.
  • If he answered yes he could be accused of being harsh, no could bring a charge of cheap salvation.
  • All Jews anticipated salvation by birthright. Would Jesus challenge this erroneous view publically>
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • It is interesting that, throughout church history many have debated ‘who’ is to be saved as opposed to considering ‘how’ it is to be achieved. Jesus again gives no direct answer to the question posed as he had come to guide our consciences not to gratify our curiosity!
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 24Make every effort to enter through the narrow door, because many, I tell you, will try to enter and will not be able to.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Make every effort to enter through the narrow door:
  • Those along the path are the ones who hear, and then the devil comes and takes away the word from their hearts, so that they may not believe and be saved (Luke 8:12).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Manywill try to enter and will not be able to:
  • There will come a time when the offer to turn to Christ will come to an end.
  • Those who come to Christ will find out that it was not by their will but the Father’s calling that they responded, even though the emphasis seems to be about our response.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Entering by the narrow door, or straight gate as some would have it, requires us to undergo a strict transformation.
  • Jesus answered, I tell you the truth, no-one can enter the kingdom of God unless he is born of water and the Spirit (John 3:5).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Jews expected to come to salvation by birthright but Jesus is teaching something new. It is not about who they are as a group but who they are as an individual and how their heart is towards God.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Jews expected to come to salvation by birthright but Jesus is teaching something new. It is not about who they are as a group but who they are as an individual and how their heart is towards God.
  • It is not as though God’s word had failed. For not all who are descended from Israel are Israel (Romans 9:6).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • The door of mercy and grace is the only entrance to the kingdom yet many people try to enter by other means, such as their work, their ethnicity, by belonging to a church, or through self-righteousness.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 25 Once the owner of the house gets up and closes the door, you will stand outside knocking and pleading, ‘Sir, open the door for us’. But he will answer, ‘I don’t know you or where you come from’.
  • 26 Then you will say, ‘We ate and drank with you, and you taught in our streets’.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 27 But he will reply, ‘I don’t know you or where you come from. Away from me, all you evildoers!
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 27 But he will reply, ‘I don’t know you or where you come from. Away from me, all you evildoers!
  • I don’t know you, away from me. Jesus is not only the Saviour but also the final Judge of all mankind.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • We have to remember that in the coming age, Christ will judge as God the Father’s representative, ruling the kingdom the Father has given him, so that each one may receive what is due for what he has done, whether good or evil.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • The aim of judgement:
  • To determine the measure of reward?
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • The aim of judgement:
  • To determine the measure of reward?
  • To determine who is lost and who is saved?
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • For we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ, so that each of us may receive what is due us for the things done while in the body, whether good or bad.
  • (2 Corinthians 5:10).
  • This would indicated both aims are in view.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • The first case.
  • The second case.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • The first case.
  • The second case.
  • Paul’s aim was to please Christ.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • The first case.
  • The second case.
  • Paul’s aim was to please Christ.
  • Genuine believers will pass Christ’s judgement.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 28 There will be weeping there, and gnashing of teeth, when you see Abraham, Isaac and Jacoband all the prophetsin the kingdom of God, but you yourselves thrown out.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Abraham, Isaac and Jacob:
  • But in the account of the burning bush, even Moses showed that the dead rise, for he calls the Lord ‘the God of Abraham, and the God of Isaac, and the God of Jacob’ (Luke 20:37).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • I say to you that many will come from the east and the west, and will take their places at the feast with Abraham, Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven (Matthew 8:11).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • I say to you that many will come from the east and the west, and will take their places at the feast with Abraham, Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven (Matthew 8:11).
  • The God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, the God of our fathers, has glorified his servant Jesus. You handed him over to be killed, and you disowned him before Pilate, though he had decided to let him go (Acts 3:13).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • ‘I am the God of your fathers, the God of Abraham, Isaac and Jacob’. Moses trembled with fear and did not dare to look.
  • (Acts 7:32).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • And all the prophets:
  • Therefore this generation will be held responsible for the blood of all the prophets that has been shed since the beginning of the world (Luke 11:50).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • And all the prophets:
  • Therefore this generation will be held responsible for the blood of all the prophets that has been shed since the beginning of the world (Luke 11:50).
  • And beginning with Moses and all the Prophets, he explained to them what was said in all the Scriptures concerning himself. (Luke 24:27).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • But this is how God fulfilled what he had foretold through all the prophets, saying that his Messiah would suffer (Acts 3:18).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • But this is how God fulfilled what he had foretold through all the prophets, saying that his Messiah would suffer (Acts 3:18).
  • Indeed, beginning with Samuel, all the prophets who have spoken have foretold these days (Acts 3;24).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • All the prophets testify about him that everyone who believes in him receives forgiveness of sins through his name.
  • (Acts 10:43).
  • Represent believing Israel in the Kingdom of God.
  • But those listening, who did not believe in Jesus, will be thrown out or excluded.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 29 People will come from east and west and north and south, and will take their places at the feast in the kingdom of God.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • East and west and north and south:
  • Those he gathered from the lands, from east and west, from north and south.
  • (Psalm 107:3).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • East and west and north and south:
  • Those he gathered from the lands, from east and west, from north and south.
  • (Psalm 107:3).
  • And repentance for the forgiveness of sins will be preached in his name to all nations, beginning at Jerusalem (Luke 24:47).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • But you will receive power when the Holy Spirit comes on you; and you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, and in all Judæa and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.
  • (Acts 1:8).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • It has been stated many times in scripture that God will save a remnant of Israel for himself.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • It has been stated many times in scripture that God will save a remnant of Israel for himself.
  • I am talking to you Gentiles. In as much as I am the apostle to the Gentiles, I make much of my ministry in the hope that I may somehow arouse my own people to envy and save some of them (Romans 11:13-14).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 30 Indeed there are those who are last who will be first, and first who will be last.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 30 Indeed there are those who are last who will be first, and first who will be last.
  • Will be first, will be last:
  • A disciple of Jesus should not measure his or her worth by comparing it with the accomplishments and sacrifices of others but should focus on serving from a heart of gratitude in response to God’s grace.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Luke 13:31–35 - Jesus’ sorrow for Jerusalem
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Luke 13:31–35 - Jesus’ sorrow for Jerusalem
  • As he warns his disciples about Herod Antipas and laments over Jerusalem, Jesus again emphasises that many Israelites will be excluded from the kingdom.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 31At that time some Pharisees came to Jesus and said to him, Leave this place and go somewhere else. Herod wants to kill you.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • At that timeor very hour ties the present account closely with the preceding.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • At that timeor very hour ties the present account closely with the preceding.
  • Herod is Herod Antipas the tetrarch of Galilee and Perea, where Jesus likely was teaching. Herod has been discussed in earlier passages.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 32 He replied, Go tell that fox, ‘I will drive out demons and heal people today and tomorrow, and on the third day I will reach my goal’.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 32 He replied, Go tell that fox, ‘I will drive out demons and heal people today and tomorrow, and on the third day I will reach my goal’.
  • Fox is a metaphor for Herod who had a reputation for being deceitful and cunning. 
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • I will drive out demons and heal:
  • At sunset, the people brought to Jesus all who had various kinds of sickness, and laying his hands on each one, he healed them. Moreover, demons came out of many people, shouting, “You are the Son of God!” But he rebuked them and would not allow them to speak, because they knew he was the Messiah (Luke 4:40–41).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Reach my goal. The present tense emphasise Jesus’ continuing ministry and his steady march towards the Cross.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Thethird day refers to the day of Jesus’ resurrection:
  • And he said, “The Son of Man must suffer many things and be rejected by the elders, the chief priests and the teachers of the law, and he must be killed and on the third day be raised to life” (Luke 9:22).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Jesus had work to do today, tomorrow and indeed beyond the glorious third day, and there is nothing that can prevent him from achieving that. This too should be our testimony.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 33 In any case, I must keep goingtoday and tomorrow and the next day — for surelyno prophet can die outside Jerusalem!
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 33 In any case, I must keep goingtoday and tomorrow and the next day — for surelyno prophet can die outside Jerusalem!
  • I must keep going. Jesus was committed to finishing his course.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Today and tomorrow indicate a limited time:
  • And the LORD said to Moses, Go to the people and consecrate them today and tomorrow.
  • (Exodus 19:10a).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • For surely Herod Antipas’ plotting (v.31) could not interfere with God’s plan.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • For surely Herod Antipas’ plotting (v.31) could not interfere with God’s plan.
  • No prophet can die outside Jerusalem:
  • Jesus did not mean that no prophet had ever died outside of Jerusalem for some had. For example: Ezekiel was martyred in the land of the Chaldeans, Micah was martyred by Jehoram in Ephraim, and Amos by Amaziah in Tekoa.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Jesus was indicating that Jerusalem held more dangers for a prophet than did men like Herod Antipas.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Jesus was indicating that Jerusalem held more dangers for a prophet than did men like Herod Antipas.
  • For by the earth, for it is his footstool; or by Jerusalem, for it is the city of the Great King (Matthew 5:35).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Great is the LORD, and most worthy of praise, in the city of our God, his holy mountain. Beautiful in its loftiness, the joy of the whole earth, like the heights of Zaphon is Mount Zion, the city of the Great King (Psalm 48:1–2).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • A brief history of Jerusalem.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • A brief history of Jerusalem.
  • Archelaus, during his barbarous 10 year reign, was considered a threat to the young Jesus.
  • But when he heard that Archelaus was reigning in Judæa in place of his father Herod, he was afraid to go there.
  • (Matthew 2:22).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 34O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, you who kill the prophets and stone those sent to you, how often I have longed to gather your children together, as a hen gathers her chicks under her wings, but you were not willing!
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  • O Jerusalem, Jerusalem Jesus bemoaned the fate of Jerusalem with its inhabitants at the time being around 25,000 to 30,000.
  • His lament, however, also applied to all of Israel since Jerusalem was the religious and political centre of the nation.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • As a hen gathers her chicks under her wings:
  • Like an eagle that stirs up its nest and hovers over its young, that spreads its wings to catch them and carries them aloft.
  • (Deuteronomy 32:11).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • As a hen gathers her chicks under her wings:
  • Like an eagle that stirs up its nest and hovers over its young, that spreads its wings to catch them and carries them aloft.
  • (Deuteronomy 32:11).
  • May the LORD repay you for what you have done. May you be richly rewarded by the LORD, the God of Israel, under whose wings you have come to take refuge (Ruth 2:12).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Keep me as the apple of your eye; hide me in the shadow of your wings (Psalm 17:8).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Keep me as the apple of your eye; hide me in the shadow of your wings (Psalm 17:8).
  • How priceless is your unfailing love, O God! People take refuge in the shadow of your wings (Psalm 36:7).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • Although the rejection of Jesus by many of the Jews was predicted in the OT, Jesus still feels great sorrow over their rejection, surely reflecting the heart of God as he contemplates the Jewish people rejecting his prophets and his Son.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • This lamentation occurs in Matthew 23:37-39 and is almost certainly the same one but was later on than Luke portrays it, as it was almost certainly given as Jesus arrived in Jerusalem for the last time.
  • Once again, Luke is more interested in themes than strict chronology.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • 35 Look, your house is left to you desolate. I tell you, you will not see me again until you say, ‘Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord’.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • You will not see me again until you say, ‘Blessed’ is the quoted blessing from Psalm 118:26.
  • It was chanted to incoming pilgrims on feast days.
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • “Blessed is the king who comes in the name of the Lord!” “Peace in heaven and glory in the highest!” (Luke 19:38).
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The Journey to Jerusalem
  • “Blessed is the king who comes in the name of the Lord!” “Peace in heaven and glory in the highest!” (Luke 19:38).
  • For I tell you, you will not see me again until you say, ‘Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord’ (Matthew 23:39).
  • Many interpreters understand this to be a prediction that a large number of Jews will trust in Jesus before his Second Coming.