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Data Transmission. The basics of media, signals, bits, carries, and modems (Part III). Fundamental Measures Of A Digital Transmission System. Propagation delay Determined by physics Time required for signal travel across medium

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Data Transmission


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    1. Data Transmission The basics of media, signals, bits, carries, and modems (Part III)

    2. Fundamental Measures Of A Digital Transmission System • Propagation delay • Determined by physics • Time required for signal travel across medium • Delay = propagation delay + transmission delay + queuing delay + processing delay • Throughput • The number of bits per second that can be transmitted • Related to underlying hardware bandwidth

    3. Relationship Between Digital Throughput And Bandwidth • Given by Nyquist’s theorem where • D is maximum data rate • B is hardware bandwidth • K is number of values used to encode data

    4. Application Of Nyquist’s Theorem • For RS-232 • K is 2 because RS-232 only uses two values, +15 or -15 volts, to encode data bits • D is • For phase-shift encoding • Suppose K is 8 (possible shifts) • D is • A signal can be periodic or aperiodic

    5. Noises • Noise: interference by any other (undesired) signals • Presence of noise can corrupt one or more bits • One example of noise -- “white noise”, can not be removed • Transmission impairments on digital transmission can lead to errors

    6. Shannon’s Theorem • Nyquist’s theorem • assumes a noise-free system • only works in theory • Shannon’s theorem corrects for noise

    7. Shannon’s Theorem (cont’d) • Gives capacity in presence of noise where • C is the effective channel capacity in bits per second • B is hardware bandwidth • S is the average power (signal) • N is the noise • S/N is signal-to-noise ratio: an indicator of the signal’s quality

    8. Application Of Shannon’s Theorem • Conventional telephone system • Engineered for voice • Bandwidth is 3000 Hz • signal-to-noise ratio is approximately 1000 • Effective capacity is • Conclusion: dialup modems have little hope of exceeding 30kbps

    9. The Bottom Line • Nyquist’s theorem means finding a way to encode more bits per cycle improves the data rate • Shannon’s theorem means that no amount of clever engineering can overcome the fundamental physics limits of a real transmission system

    10. Multiplexing • Fundamental to networking • Allow multiple channels/users share link capacity • Multiplexing prevents interference • Each destination receives only data sent by corresponding source

    11. Multiplexing Terminology • Multiplexor • device or mechanism • accepts data from multiple sources • sends data across shared channel • Demultiplexor • device or mechanism • extract data from shared channel • sends to correct destination

    12. Types Of Multiplexing • Time Division Multiplexing (TDM) • Only one item at a time on shared channel • Item marked to identify source • Each channel allowed to be carried during preassigned timeslots only • Examples: SONET/SDH, N-ISDN • Pros: fair, simple to implement • Cons: inefficient (i.e., empty slots when user has no data)

    13. Types Of Multiplexing (cont’d) • Frequency Division Multiplexing (FDM) • Multiple items transmitted simultaneously • Each channel is allocated a particular portion of the bandwidth (called bands). • Example: TV, radio • All (modulated) signals are carried simultaneously (as a composite analog signal)

    14. Types Of Multiplexing (cont’d) • Statistical Tine Division Multiplexing (STDM) • Each timeslot is allocated on a demand basis (dynamically). • Example: ATM • Pros: improved performance • Cons: requires buffering when aggregate input load exceeds link capacity

    15. Transmission Schemes • Baseband transmission • Uses only low frequencies • Encode data directly • Broadband transmission • Uses multiple carries • Can use higher frequencies • Achieves higher throughput • Hardware more complex and expensive

    16. Scientific Principle Behind FDM • Two or more signals that use different carrier frequencies can be transmitted over a single medium simultaneously without interference • Note: this is the same principle that allows a cable TV company to send multiple television signals across a single cable

    17. Wave Division Multiplexing • Facts • FDM can be used with any electromagnetic radiation • Light is electromagnetic radiation • When applied to light, FDM is called wave division multiplexing

    18. Summary • Various transmission schemes and media available • Electrical current over copper • Light over glass • Electromagnetic waves • Digital encoding used for data • Asynchronous communication • Used for keyboards and serial ports • RS-232 is standard • Sender and receiver agree on baud rate

    19. Summary (cont’d) • Modems • Used for long-distance communication • Available for copper, optical fiber, dialup • Transmit modulated carrier • Phase-shift modulation popular • Classified of digital communication system • Two measures of digital communication system • Delay • Throughput

    20. Summary (cont’d) • Nyquist’s theorem • Relates throughput to bandwidth • Encourages engineers to use complex encoding • Shannon’s theorem • Adjust for noise • Specifies limits on real transmission systems

    21. Summary (cont’d) • Multiplexing • Fundamental concept • Used at many levels • Applied in both hardware and software • Three basic types • Time-division multiplexing (TDM) • Frequency-division multiplexing (FDM) • Statistical time-division multiplexing (STDM) • When applied to light, FDM is called wave-division multiplexing

    22. Reading Materials • Chapter 5: Sections 5.8-5.11 • Chapter 6: Sections 6.6-6.11