correction des r sultats exp rimentaux lors du processus de criblage haut d bit n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Correction des résultats expérimentaux lors du processus de criblage à haut débit PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Correction des résultats expérimentaux lors du processus de criblage à haut débit

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 39

Correction des résultats expérimentaux lors du processus de criblage à haut débit - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 66 Views
  • Uploaded on

Correction des résultats expérimentaux lors du processus de criblage à haut débit. Vladimir Makarenkov Université du Québec à Montréal ( UQAM ) Montréal, Canada. Talk outline. What is HTS ? Hit selection Random and systematic error Statistical methods to correct HTS measurements:

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Correction des résultats expérimentaux lors du processus de criblage à haut débit' - kiora


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
correction des r sultats exp rimentaux lors du processus de criblage haut d bit

Correction des résultats expérimentaux lors du processus de criblage à haut débit

Vladimir Makarenkov

Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

Montréal, Canada

talk outline
Talk outline
  • What is HTS ?
  • Hit selection
  • Random and systematic error
  • Statistical methods to correct HTS measurements:
    • Removal of the evaluated background
    • Well correction
  • Comparison of methods for HTS data correction and hit selection
  • Conclusions
what is hts
What is HTS?
  • High-throughput screening (HTS) is a large-scale process to screen thousands of chemical compounds to identify potential drug candidates (i.e. hits).

Malo, N. et al., Nature Biotechnol. 24, no. 2, 167-175 (2006).

what is hts1
An HTS procedure consists of running chemical compounds arranged in 2-dimensional plates through an automated screening system that makes experimental measurements.What is HTS?
what is hts2
What is HTS?
  • Samples are located in wells
  • The plates are processed in sequence
  • Screened samples can be divided into active (i.e. hits) and inactive ones
  • Most of the samples are inactive
  • The measured values for the active samples are substantially different from the inactive ones
hts technology
HTS technology

Automated plate handling system and plates of SSI Robotics

classical hit selection
Classical hit selection
  • Compute the mean value  and standard deviation  of the observed plate (or of the whole assay)
  • Identify samples whose values differ from the mean  by at least c (where c is a preliminary chosen constant)
  • For example, in case of an inhibition assay, by choosing c = 3, we select samples with values lower than  - 3
random and systematic error
Random error : a variability that randomly deviates all measured values from their “true” levels. This is a result of random influences in each particular well on a particular plate (~ random noise).

Usually, it cannot be detected or compensated.

Systematic error : a systematic variability of the measured values along all plates of the assay.

It can be detected and its effect can be removed from the data.

Random and systematic error
sources of systematic error
Various sources of systematic errors can affect experimental HTS data, and thus introduce a bias into the hit selection process (Heuer et al. 2003), including:

Systematic errors caused by ageing, reagent evaporation or cell decay. They can be recognized as smooth trends in the plate means/medians.

Errors in liquid handling and malfunction of pipettes can also generate localized deviations from expected values.

Variation in incubation time, time drift in measuring different wells or different plates, and reader effects.

Sources of systematic error
random and systematic error1
Random and systematic error
  • Examples of systematic error (computed and plotted by HTS Corrector):
  • HTS assay, Chemistry Department, Princeton University : inhibition of the glycosyltransferase MurG function of E. coli., 164 plates, 22 rows and 16 columns.

Hit distribution by rows and columns of Assay 1 computed for 164 plates.

Hits were selected with the threshold m-1.

raw and evaluated background an example
Raw and evaluated background: an example
  • Computed and plotted by HTS Corrector
systematic error detection tests comparison
Systematic error detection tests comparison

Simulation 1. Plate Size: 96 wells – Cohen’s Kappa vs Error Size (from Dragiev et al., 2011)

Systematic error size: 10% (at most 2 columns and 2 rows affected). First column: (a) - (c): a = 0.01; Second column: (d) - (f): a = 0.1. Systematic Error Detection Tests: () t-test and () K-S test.

systematic error detection tests comparison1
Systematic error detection tests comparison

Simulation 2, Plate Size: 96 wells, Cohen’s Kappa vs Hit Percentage (from Dragiev et al., 2011)

Systematic error size: 10% (at most 2 columns and 2 rows affected). First column: cases (a) - (b): a = 0.01; Second column: cases (c) - (d): a = 0.1. Systematic Error Detection Tests: () t-test, () K-S test and () goodness-of-fit test.

data normalization called z score normalization
Data normalization (called z-score normalization)
  • Applying the following formula, we can normalize the elements of the input data:
  • where xi - input element, x'i - normalized output element,  - mean value,  - standard deviation, and n – total number of elements in the plate.

The output data conditions will be x’=0 and x’=1.

evaluated background
Evaluated background
  • An assay background can be defined as the mean of normalized plate measurements, i.e.

where :

x'i,j - normalized value in well i of plate j,

zi - background value in well i,

N - total number of plates.

removing the evaluated background main steps
Removing the evaluated background: main steps
  • Normalization of the HTS data by plate
  • Elimination of the outliers
  • Computation of the evaluated background
  • Elimination of systematic errors by subtracting the evaluated background from the normalized data
  • Selection of hits in the corrected data
hit distribution after the correction
Hit distribution after the correction
  • HTS assay, Chemistry Department, Princeton University : inhibition of the glycosyltransferase MurG function of E. coli., 164 plates, 22 rows and 16 columns.

Hit distribution by rows in Assay 1 (164 plates): (a) hits selected

with the threshold m-1;(b) hits selected with the threshold m-2

well correction method main ideas
Well correction method: main ideas
  • Once the data are plate normalized, it is possible to analyze their values in each particular well along the entire assay
  • The distribution of inactive measurements along a fixed well should be zero-mean centered (if there is no systematic error) and the compounds are randomly distributed along this well
  • Values along each well may have ascending and descending trends that can be detected via a polynomial approximation
example of systematic error in the mcmaster dataset
Example of systematic error in the McMaster dataset

Hit distribution surface for a McMaster dataset (1250 plates - a screen of compounds that inhibit the Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase). Values deviating from the plate means for more than 1 standard deviation (SD) were taken into account during the computation. Well, row and column positional effects are shown.

well correction method an example
Well correction method: an example
  • McMaster University HTS laboratory screen of compounds to inhibit the Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase.
  • 1250 plates with 8 rows and 10 columns.
well correction method main steps
Well correction method: main steps
  • Normalize the data within each plate (plate normalization)
  • Compute the trend along each well using polynomial approximation
  • Subtract the obtained trend from the plate normalized values
  • Normalize the data along each well (well normalization)
  • Reexamine the hit distribution surface
hit distribution for different thresholds for the raw and corrected mcmaster data
Hit distribution for different thresholds for the raw and corrected McMaster data

Hit distributions for the raw (a, c, and e) and well-corrected (b, d, and f) McMaster datasets (a screen of compounds that inhibit the Escherichia coli dihydrofolate reductase; 1250 plates of size 8x10) obtained for the thresholds:

(a and b) : m - 1s

(c and d) : m – 1.5s

(e and f) : m - 2s

simulations with random data constant noise comparison of the hit selection methods
Simulations with random data: Constant noiseComparison of the hit selection methods

Hit detection rate

False positives

 - classical hit selection

O - background subtraction method

∆ - well correction method

simulations with random data variable noise comparison of the hit selection methods
Simulations with random data: Variable noiseComparison of the hit selection methods

Hit detection rate

False positives

 - classical hit selection

O - background subtraction method

∆ - well correction method

comparison of methods for data correction in hts 1
Comparison of methods for data correction in HTS (1)

Method 1. Classical hit selection using the value m - csas a hit selection threshold, where the mean value m and standard deviation s are computed separately for each plate and c is a preliminary chosen constant (usually c equals 3).

Method 2. Classical hit selection using the value m - csas a hit selection threshold, where the mean value m and standard deviation s are computed over all the assay values, and c is a preliminary chosen constant. This method can be chosen when we are certain that all plates of the given assay were processed under the “same testing conditions”.

comparison of methods for data correction in hts 2
Comparison of methods for data correction in HTS (2)

Method 3.Median polish procedure (Tukey 1977) can be used to remove the impact of systematic error. Median polish works by alternately removing the row and column medians. In our study, Method 2 was applied to the values of the matrix of the obtained residuals in order to select hits.

Method 4 (designed at Merck Frost).B score normalization procedure (Brideau et al., 2003) is designed to remove row/column biases in HTS (Malo et al., 2006). The residual (rijp) of the measurement for row i and column j on the p-th plate is obtained by median polish. The B score is calculated as follows:

B score =

where MADp = median{|rijp – median(rijp)|}. To select hits, this computation was followed by Method 2, applied to the B score matrix.

comparison of methods for data correction in hts 3
Comparison of methods for data correction in HTS (3)
  • Method 5.Well correctionprocedure followed by Method 2 applied to the well-corrected data. The well correction method consists of two main steps:

1. Least-squares approximation of the data carried out separately for each well of the assay.

2. Z score normalization of the data within each wellacross all plates of the assay

simulation design
Simulation design
  • Random standard normal datasets N(0, 1) were generated.
  • Different percentages of hits (1% to 5%) were added to them.
  • Systematic error following a standard normal distribution with parameters N(0, c), where c equals 0, 0.6s, 1.2s, 1.8s, 2.4s, or 3s was added to them. Two types of systematic error were :

A. Systematic errors stemming from row x column interactions: Different constant values were applied to each row and each column of the first plate. The same constants were added to the corresponding rows and columns of all other plates.

B. Systematic error stemming from changing row x column interactions: As in (A) but with the values of the row and column constants varying across plates.

systematic error stemming from constant row x column interactions
Systematic error stemming from constant row x column interactions

A. Systematic errors stemming from row x column interactions: Different constant values were applied to each row and each column of the first plate. The same constants were added to the corresponding rows and columns of all other plates.

slide33
Results for systematic error stemming from row x column interactions which are constant across plates (SD = s)

The results were obtained with the methods using plates’ parameters (i.e., Method 1, ◊), assay parameters (i.e., Method 2, □), median polish (x), B score (○), and well correction (). The abscissa axis indicates the noise factor (a and c - with fixed hit percentage of 1%) and the percentage of added hits (b and d - with fixed error rate of 1.2SD).

systematic error stemming from varying row x column interactions
Systematic error stemming from varying row x column interactions

B. Systematic error stemming from changing row x column interactions: As in (A) but with the values of the row and column constants varying across plates.

slide35
Results for systematic error stemming from row x column interactions which are varying across plates (SD = s)

The results were obtained with the methods using plates’ parameters (i.e., Method 1, ◊), assay parameters (i.e., Method 2, □), median polish (x), B score (○), and well correction (). The abscissa axis indicates the noise factor (a and c - with fixed hit percentage of 1%) and the percentage of added hits (b and d - with fixed error rate of 1.2SD).

hts corrector software
HTS Corrector Software

Main features

Visualization of HTS assays

Data partitioning using k-means

Evaluation of the background surface

Correction of experimental datasets

Hit selection using different methods

Chi-square analysis of hit distribution

Contact: makarenkov.vladimir@uqam.ca

Download from: http://www.info2.uqam.ca/~makarenv/HTS/home.php

conclusions
Conclusions
  • The proposed well correction method (Makarenkov et al, 2007) rectifies the distribution of assay measurements by normalizing data within each considered well across all assay plates.
  • Simulations suggest that the well correction procedure is a robust method that should be used prior to the hit selection process.
  • When neither hits nor systematic errors were present in the data, the well correction method showed the performances similar to the traditional methods of hit selection.
  • Well correction generally outperformed the Median polish and B score methods as well as the classical hit selection procedure.
  • The simulation study confirmed that Method 2 based on the assay parameters was more accurate than Method 1 based on the plates’ parameters. Therefore, in case of identical testing conditions for all plates of the given assay, all assay measurements should be treated as a single batch.
future research
Future research
  • Application of clustering methods for hit selection in HTS
  • Incorporation into the method the information about chemical properties of the tested compounds
  • Possible combinations with

the virtual HTS screening (vHTS)

information and combinatorial

chemistry models

references
References
  • Brideau C., Gunter B., Pikounis W., Pajni N. and Liaw A. (2003) Improved statistical methods for hit selection in HTS. J. Biomol. Screen., 8, 634-647.
  • Dragiev, P., Nadon, R. and Makarenkov, V. (2011). Systematic error detection in experimental high-throughput screening, BMC Bioinformatics, 12:25.
  • Heyse S. (2002) Comprehensive analysis of high-throughput screening data. In Proc. of SPIE 2002, 4626, 535-547.
  • Kevorkov D. and Makarenkov V. (2005) Statistical analysis of systematic errors in HTS. J. Biomol. Screen., 10, 557-567.
  • Makarenkov V., Kevorkov D., Zentilli P., Gagarin A., Malo N. and Nadon R. (2006) HTS-Corrector: new application for statistical analysis and correction of experimental data, Bioinformatics, 22, 1408-1409.
  • Makarenkov V., Zentilli P., Kevorkov D., Gagarin A., Malo N. and Nadon R. (2007) An efficient method for the detection and elimination of systematic error in HTS, Bioinformatics, 23, 1648-1657.
  • Malo N., Hanley J.A., Cerquozzi S., Pelletier J. and Nadon R. (2006) Statistical practice in HTS data analysis. Nature Biotechnol., 24, 167-175.
  • Tukey J.W. (1977) Exploratory Data Analysis. Cambridge, MA: Addison-Wesley.