slide1 n.
Download
Skip this Video
Loading SlideShow in 5 Seconds..
Managing Alcohol in Europe Peter Anderson MD, PhD, MPH Fort Myers 5 January 2007 PowerPoint Presentation
Download Presentation
Managing Alcohol in Europe Peter Anderson MD, PhD, MPH Fort Myers 5 January 2007

Loading in 2 Seconds...

play fullscreen
1 / 66

Managing Alcohol in Europe Peter Anderson MD, PhD, MPH Fort Myers 5 January 2007 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


  • 114 Views
  • Uploaded on

Managing Alcohol in Europe Peter Anderson MD, PhD, MPH Fort Myers 5 January 2007. Alcohol is no ordinary commodity Alcohol is an important health determinant Education not an alternative to regulating the alcohol market

loader
I am the owner, or an agent authorized to act on behalf of the owner, of the copyrighted work described.
capcha
Download Presentation

PowerPoint Slideshow about 'Managing Alcohol in Europe Peter Anderson MD, PhD, MPH Fort Myers 5 January 2007' - kimberly


An Image/Link below is provided (as is) to download presentation

Download Policy: Content on the Website is provided to you AS IS for your information and personal use and may not be sold / licensed / shared on other websites without getting consent from its author.While downloading, if for some reason you are not able to download a presentation, the publisher may have deleted the file from their server.


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - E N D - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Presentation Transcript
slide1

Managing Alcohol in Europe

Peter Anderson MD, PhD, MPH

Fort Myers

5 January 2007

slide2

Alcohol is no ordinary commodity

  • Alcohol is an important health determinant
  • Education not an alternative to regulating the alcohol market
  • Brief advice complements but does not replace regulating the alcohol market
  • Options for regulating the alcohol market
    • Price
    • Availability
    • Advertising
slide3

Alcohol is no ordinary commodity

  • Alcohol is an important health determinant in Europe
  • Education not an alternative to regulating the alcohol market
  • Brief advice complements but does not replace regulating the alcohol market
  • Options for regulating the alcohol market
    • Price
    • Availability
    • Advertising
slide4

is a toxin that can harm almost any system or organ of the body, leading to more than 60 different acute and chronic disorders;

  • can exacerbate pre-existing mental and physical disorders, adversely interact with other prescribed and illicit drugs, and contribute to a wide range of social problems;
  • can pose a significant risk to third parties, including the foetus;
slide5

can weaken the immune system and thus may increase the risk for communicable diseases such as TB, HIV/AIDS or different forms of hepatitis;

  • can lead to a higher risk of unsafe sex thereby increasing the risk of sexually transmitted diseases;
slide6

shows wide individual variation in the toxic effects of consuming a given amount;

has no threshold below which consumption can be regarded as entirely risk free;

produces a state of dependence, CNS depression and stimulation, ill effects, and abuse liability.

slide8

Alcohol is no ordinary commodity

  • Alcohol is an important health determinant
  • Education not an alternative to regulating the alcohol market
  • Brief advice complements but does not replace regulating the alcohol market
  • Options for regulating the alcohol market
    • Price
    • Availability
    • Advertising
slide12

28% of all male deaths at age 15-29 years are due to alcohol

11% of all female deaths at age 15-29 years are due to alcohol

slide13

Alcohol is no ordinary commodity

  • Alcohol is an important health determinant
  • Education not an alternative to regulating the alcohol market
  • Brief advice complements but does not replace regulating the alcohol market
  • Options for regulating the alcohol market
    • Price
    • Availability
    • Advertising
slide14

Although there are individual examples of the beneficial impact of school-based education, systematic reviews and meta-analyses find that the majority of well-evaluated studies show no impact even in the short-term.

slide15

The impact of 2 education sessions [] on binge drinking in 13-15 year olds

The impact of 2 education sessions [] on binge drinking in 13-15 year olds

slide16

Educational programmes should not be implemented in isolation as an alcohol policy measure, or with the sole purpose of reducing the harm done by alcohol, but rather as a measure to reinforce awareness of the problems created by alcohol and to prepare the ground for specific interventions and policy changes.

slide17

Alcohol is no ordinary commodity

  • Alcohol is an important health determinant
  • Education not an alternative to regulating the alcohol market
  • Brief advice complements but does not replace regulating the alcohol market
  • Options for regulating the alcohol market
    • Price
    • Availability
    • Advertising
slide19

Alcohol is no ordinary commodity

  • Alcohol is an important health determinant
  • Education not an alternative to regulating the alcohol market
  • Brief advice complements but does not replace regulating the alcohol market
  • Options for regulating the alcohol market
    • Price
    • Availability
    • Advertising
slide20

Options for regulating the alcohol market

    • Increasing the price of alcohol reduces alcohol-related harm, particularly amongst younger and heavier drinkers
    • Increasing the availability of alcohol increases alcohol-related harm
    • Both the content and volume of alcohol advertising need to be regulated in order to reduce young people’s drinking
slide21

Options for regulating the alcohol market

    • Increasing the price of alcohol reduces alcohol-related harm, particularly amongst younger and heavier drinkers
    • Increasing the availability of alcohol increases alcohol-related harm
    • Both the content and volume of alcohol advertising need to be regulated in order to reduce young people’s drinking
slide22

Principles of EU tax policy:

  • Taxes should be shifted from labour to social costs to contribute to the EU goals of increasing employment and reducing negative health impacts in a cost-effective way
slide23

Increases in alcohol taxes:

    • cirrhosis death rates
    • road traffic accidents and fatalities
    • intentional and unintentional injuries
    • workplace injuries
    • sexually transmitted disease rates
    • rapes and robberies
    • homicides
    • crime
    • child abuse
    • wife abuse
slide24

Alcohol taxes have a greater impact:

  • Younger drinkers
  • Heavier drinkers
  • Poorer drinkers
slide25

Before alcopop tax

After alcopop tax

slide26

Principles of EU tax policy:

  • New revenues can be allocated to specific funds to be used for financing measures to lessen or offset external costs
slide27

Levy introduced on alcohol (>3% strength) to fund a community programme, with restricted availability, and improved education and treatment

Northern Territories, Australia

Control region, Australia

Acute alcohol

deaths/100,000

Chronic alcohol

deaths/100,000

slide28

Acute alcohol Chronic alcohol

deaths/100,000 deaths/100,000

slide29

Options for regulating the alcohol market

    • Increasing the price of alcohol reduces alcohol-related harm, particularly amongst younger and heavier drinkers
    • Increasing the availability of alcohol increases alcohol-related harm
    • Both the content and volume of alcohol advertising need to be regulated in order to reduce young people’s drinking
slide32

Finnish studies have found an overall impact on alcohol consumption from changes in the number of outlets.

The most dramatic change was observed in 1969, when beer up to 4.7% alcohol was allowed to be sold by grocery stores, and it also became easier to get a restaurant license.

The number of off-premise sales points increased from 132 to about 17,600, and on-premise sales points grew from 940 to over 4000.

slide33

In the following year:

    • alcohol consumption increased by 46%.
  • In the following five years:
    • mortality from liver cirrhosis increased by 50%
    • hospital admissions for alcoholic psychosis increased by 110% for men and 130% for women
    • arrests for drunkenness increased by 80% for men and 160% for women.
slide38

In England, since 1980:

Bars and nightclubs  10%

Licensed hotels and restaurants  68%

Off licences  100%

Licence applications  145%

Alcohol 54% more affordable than in 1980

Manchester capacity  250% 1996-2000

slide46

Homicide rate/million

18/mn

10/mn

14/mn

slide48

Options for regulating the alcohol market

    • Increasing the price of alcohol reduces alcohol-related harm, particularly amongst younger and heavier drinkers
    • Increasing the availability of alcohol increases alcohol-related harm
    • Both the content and volume of alcohol advertising need to be regulated in order to reduce young people’s drinking
slide49
Ellickson et al.:

Exposure to in-store beer displays predicts drinking onset;

exposure to alcohol ads in magazines or beer concession stands at sports or music events predicts greater frequency of drinking.

(Addiction 2005)

slide50
Stacy et al.:

One standard deviation increase in viewing television programs containing alcohol commercials in seventh grade (11-12 year-olds) associated with an excess risk of

beer use (44%),

wine/liquor use (34%),

and 3-drink episodes (26%)

in eighth grade (12-13 year-olds).

(Am J Health Behav 2004)

slide51
Snyder et al.:

For every additional alcohol ad kids saw above the average of 23 on TV, radio, billboards and in magazines, they drank 1% more.

For every additional dollar per capita spent above the average of $6.80 in their media market on alcohol advertising, they drank 3% more.

(Arch Ped Adol Med, 2006)

slide52
Saffer and Dave:

A 28% decrease in alcohol advertising would lead to

a between 4% and 16% drop in monthly youth drinking, and

an 8% to 33% drop in youth binge drinking

(Health Economics2006)

slide53
Youth are drawn particularly to elements of music, characters, story and humor.

Young people who liked ads believed that:

positive consequences of drinking were more likely

their peers drink more frequently

their peers approve more of drinking

These beliefs interact to produce greater likelihood of drinking, or of intention to drink within the next year.

slide54
New Beer Institute code:
  • May contain romantic or flirtatious interactions but should not portray sexually explicit activity as a result of consuming beer.

Please visit http://www.visit4info.com/details.cfm?adid=15279

to view this ad.

slide55

Current regulation:

  • Enforcement of marketing regulations is more often regulated by law, than by self-regulation.
  • Statutory regulation is very well controllable, although it is not always actively enforced.
slide56

Self-regulation mainly concerns restrictions of style and content of marketing; it is not easily controlled and its rules are multi-interpretable.

  • In countries where self-regulation exists, alcohol producers have considerably more freedom in marketing than in countries using regulations by law.
slide57

Statements on the success (and claiming the success) of self-regulation are not based on scientific research.

  • Complaints against alcohol marketing associating alcohol with, for example, social or sexual success, are commonly rejected.
the loi evin
No advertising is permitted :

when targeted to young people

on TV and cinema

No sponsorship is permitted

Messages and images should refer only to the qualities of the products

The ‘loi Evin’
slide61

Cross border advertising

The French Government was taken to court, alleging that the Loi Evin, by prohibiting alcohol advertising on hoardings visible during the retransmission of bi-national sporting events on TV, entail restrictions on the freedom to provide advertising services and television broadcasting services

slide62

Cross border advertising

  • It is in fact undeniable that advertising acts as an encouragement to consumption
  • The French rules on TV advertising do not go beyond what is necessary to achieve such an objective
  • They are appropriate to ensure their aim of protecting public health
slide65

Alcohol is no ordinary commodity

  • Alcohol is an important health determinant
  • Education not an alternative to regulating the alcohol market
  • Brief advice complements but does not replace regulating the alcohol market
  • Options for regulating the alcohol market
    • Price
    • Availability
    • Advertising
slide66

Options for regulating the alcohol market

    • Increasing the price of alcohol reduces alcohol-related harm, particularly amongst younger and heavier drinkers
    • Increasing the availability of alcohol increases alcohol-related harm
    • Both the content and volume of alcohol advertising need to be regulated in order to reduce young people’s drinking