Office of Special Programs WV Department of Education July 25, 2014 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Office of Special Programs WV Department of Education July 25, 2014

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  1. Office of Special Programs WV Department of Education July 25, 2014 School Improvement Resources for Continuous Improvement Support for Personalized Learning Career and Technical Education

  2. Subgroup Intervention for Low SES Subgroup Intervention for SWD

  3. State Board Goal The West Virginia Board of Education will provide a statewide system of education that ensures all students graduate from high school prepared for success in high-quality postsecondary opportunities in college and/or careers.

  4. Rationale The future quality of life for the citizens of West Virginia is directly linked to the performance of our students. Today's students are tomorrow's wage earners and tax payers. Low student achievement levels, decreasing graduation rates and ranking among the nation's lowest levels of post-secondary transition are all bleak predictors of West Virginia's future. We must strive to prepare our graduates to meet the requirements of high quality jobs needed within West Virginia and nationally. In addition to career preparedness, many systemic public issues like obesity, drug dependence, teen pregnancy, and crime are statistically linked to the overall level of education. Thus, unless our education system improves and our young people are prepared to be productive and responsible members of our society, the state will have decreasing resources to support the infra-structure and services essential to attracting economic growth and elevating the overall quality of life of its citizens.

  5. How will WEST VIRGINIA provide Access to the Core for All Students?

  6. How Student Groups Overlap

  7. Percentage of WV Students with Disabilities Who Belong to Other Groups

  8. http://wvde.state.wv.us/federal-programs/resources/documents/techassistance_manual.pdfhttp://wvde.state.wv.us/federal-programs/resources/documents/techassistance_manual.pdf

  9. ESEA Flexibility Waiver Menu of Interventions

  10. Policy 2510

  11. Purpose of SPL The West Virginia Support for Personalized Learning (SPL) framework is a state-wide initiative that suggests flexible use of resources to provide relevant academic, social/emotional and/or behavioral support to enhance learning for ALL students. SPL is designed to improve outcomes for students with a variety of academic and behavioral needs.

  12. Purpose of SPL SPL is characterized by a seamless system of high quality instructional practices allowing all students to make significant progress: • at-risk, • exceeding grade level expectations • or at any point along the continuum.

  13. Purpose of SPL The SPL framework supports shared responsibility between general and special education teachers for the learning outcomes of all students.

  14. CORE • The charts included are not meant to specifically define proportions by level of support. The charts are to demonstrate adjustment trends that can be expected as teachers escalate the intensity of support. All four instructional practices have value and need to be used at all levels of support. • For example, even at the CORE level, you will see an expectation for some Cognitive Strategies Instruction.

  15. CORE Instruction • High quality CORE instruction is the foundation of SPL. It is characterized by: • High expectations for all students • Takes place in an academic environment that is safe, challenging, engaging; allowing students to take academic risks without fear of failure. • Quality instruction at the CORE level requires a focus of personnel and resources as indicated by students' needs • (pages 13-23 of guidance document.)

  16. CORE Instruction • Utilizes differentiated and scaffolded instruction to meet students’ needs • Incorporates small group activities • Focuses on the most critical standards and objectives • Utilizes evidence from summative and ongoing formative assessment to make instructional decisions • Maximizes instructional time • Emphasizes 24/7 learning

  17. http://wvde.state.wv.us/evalwv/documents/TeacherEvaluationGuidebook2013_001.pdfhttp://wvde.state.wv.us/evalwv/documents/TeacherEvaluationGuidebook2013_001.pdf

  18. ESEA Flexibility Waiver Menu of Interventions

  19. Examples of UDL for Learning http://iris.peabody.vanderbilt.edu/udl/udl_02.html

  20. TARGETED The charts included are not meant to specifically define proportions by level of support. The charts are to demonstrate adjustment trends that can be expected as teachers escalate the intensity of support. All four instructional practices have value and need to be used at all levels of support.

  21. Targeted Instruction TARGETED instruction provides additional support when a student's progress in the regular classroom environment, despite strong commitment and high quality instruction at the CORE level, slows to below State-approved grade-level standards or exceeds State-approved grade-level standards (pages 18-20).

  22. SPL endorses the value of instructional supports at the TARGETED level including: • Within the regular classroom, teachers should provide ongoing feedback, differentiation, and multiple strategies to engage students • Providing instruction that emphasizes skill building as well as instruction that emphasizes application of skills • Teacher use of learning progressions within the standards and objectives as guidance for constructing scaffolding • Peer interaction to scaffold student understanding • Accommodations that affect how a student learns, not what they are expected to learn

  23. http://wvde.state.wv.us/evalwv/documents/TeacherEvaluationGuidebook2013_001.pdfhttp://wvde.state.wv.us/evalwv/documents/TeacherEvaluationGuidebook2013_001.pdf

  24. ESEA Flexibility Waiver Menu of Interventions

  25. Differentiation Includes • High expectations for all students • Front end and back end scaffolding • Presenting information and course content in multiple formats so that all students can access it • Allowing students alternatives to express or demonstrate their learning • Stimulating students' interests and motivation for learning in a variety of ways • Utilizing Bloom’s Taxonomy based on learner level of understanding • Assigning activities geared to different learning styles, interests

  26. Sample Inventory dessa.edu/dept/govt/dille/brian/courses/1100orientation/learningstyleinventory_survey.pdf

  27. INTENSIVE The charts included are not meant to specifically define proportions by level of support. The charts are to demonstrate adjustment trends that can be expected as teachers escalate the intensity of support. All four instructional practices have value and need to be used at all levels of support.

  28. Intensive Support • INTENSIVE instructional support is designed for students whose progress, despite rich and meaningful instruction at the CORE and TARGETED levels, slows to below State-approved grade level standards, or significantly exceeds State-approved grade-level standards. • Instructional support at the INTENSIVE level focuses on individual needs as indicated by the assembled data from CORE and TARGETED instruction and additional data sources as needed (page 21-22).

  29. http://wvde.state.wv.us/evalwv/documents/TeacherEvaluationGuidebook2013_001.pdfhttp://wvde.state.wv.us/evalwv/documents/TeacherEvaluationGuidebook2013_001.pdf

  30. ESEA Flexibility Waiver Menu of Interventions

  31. What is Scaffolding? An instructional technique, in which the teacher breaks a complex task into smaller tasks, models the desired learning strategy or task, provides support as student learn to do the task and then gradually shifts responsibility to the students. In this manner, a teacher enables students to accomplish as much of a task as possible without adult assistance.

  32. Why Scaffold Student Learning? • Students will learn more efficiently and effectively. • Students will become more conscious of structures, tools and processes that are compatible with how they learn. • Learner’s will become more successful in directing their own learning.

  33. Students with Disabilities The charts included are not meant to specifically define proportions by level of support. The charts are to demonstrate adjustment trends that can be expected as teachers escalate the intensity of support. All four instructional practices have value and need to be used at all levels of support.

  34. Students with Disabilities

  35. Cognitive Strategies Instruction In SPI, Cognitive Strategies Instruction is described as a specific form of scaffolding that supports learners in using thinking processes that are typically overt and even sub-conscious for highly skilled users. While many learners independently work their way to successful management of these cognitive processes, others have been found to benefit from instructional supports, customized to their personal needs.

  36. Can you personalize learning in Career and Technical Education Programs?

  37. Policy 2510

  38. Supporting Students with Disabilities

  39. TCTW and SPL Assessment Curriculum and Instruction Teams and Processes Family and Community Partnerships Climate and Culture Leadership